Scotland European Region

2014 Election
2014 Results
1. Ian Hudghton (SNP) 389503 29% (-0.1%)
2. David Martin (Labour) 348219 25.9% (+5.1%)
3. Ian Duncan (Conservative) 231330 17.2% (+0.4%)
4. Alyn Smith (SNP) (194752)
5. Catherine Stihler (Labour) (174110)
6. David Coburn (UKIP) 140534 10.5% (+5.2%)
. (Scottish Green) 108305 8.1% (+0.8%)
. (Liberal Democrats) 95319 7.1% (-4.4%)
. (Britain First) 13639 1% (n/a)
. (BNP) 10216 0.8% (-1.7%)
. (No2EU) 6418 0.5% (-0.4%)
Current sitting MEPs
portrait
Ian Hudghton (SNP) Former leader of Angus council. MEP for North-East Scotland 1998-1999, for Scotland since 1999.
portrait
David Martin (Labour) Born 1954, Edinburgh. Educated at Libertson High School. Lothian regional councillor 1982-1984. MEP for Lothian 1984. MEP for Scotland since 1999.
portrait
Ian Duncan (Conservative) Born in Alyth. Educated at Alyth High School and St Andrews University. Public affairs professional and former Scottish Parliamentary clerk. Contested Aberdeen South 2003 Scottish election. MEP for Scotland since 2014.
portrait
Alyn Smith (SNP) Born 1973, Glasgow. Educated at Leeds and Heidelberg Universities. Commercial lawyer. MEP for Scotland since 2004.
portrait
Catherine Stihler (Labour) Born 1973, Bellshill. Educated at Coltness High School and St Andrews University. Former researcher for Anne Begg. MEP for Scotland since 1999. Contested Angus 1997, Dunfermline and West Fife by-election 2006.
portrait
David Coburn (UKIP) Born in Glasgow. Businessman. Contested Old Bexley and Sidcup 2010. MEP for Scotland since 2014.

Full candidates for the 2014 European election are here.

2009 Election
2009 Results
1. Ian Hudghton (SNP) 321007 29.1% (+9.4%)
2. David Martin (Labour) 229853 20.8% (-5.6%)
3. Struan Stevenson (Conservative) 185794 16.8% (-0.9%)
4. Alyn Smith (SNP) (160504)
5. George Lyon (Liberal Democrat) 127038 11.5% (-1.6%)
6. Catherine Stihler (Labour) (114927)
. (Scottish Green) 80442 7.3% (+0.5%)
. (UKIP) 57788 5.2% (-1.5%)
. (BNP) 27174 2.5% (+0.8%)
. (Socialist Labour) 22135 2% (n/a)
. (Christian) 16738 1.5% (n/a)
. (Scottish Socialist) 10404 0.9% (-4.3%)
. Duncan Robertson (Independent) 10189 0.9% (n/a)
. (No2EU) 9693 0.9% (n/a)
. (Jury Team) 6257 0.6% (n/a)
Current sitting MEPs
portrait
Ian Hudghton (SNP) Former leader of Angus council. MEP for North-East Scotland 1998-1999, for Scotland since 1999.
portrait
David Martin (Labour) Born 1954, Edinburgh. Educated at Libertson High School. Lothian regional councillor 1982-1984. MEP for Lothian 1984. MEP for Scotland since 1999.
portrait
Struan Stevenson (Conservative) Born 1948, Ballantrae. Educated at West of Scotland Agricultural College. Formerly director of a family farmying and tourism company. Girvan councillor 1970-1974, Kyle and Carrick councillor 1972-1992. Contested Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley 1987, Edinburgh South 1992, Dumfries 1997. North-East Scotland European by-election 1999. MEP for Scotland since 1999.
portrait
Alyn Smith (SNP) Born 1973, Glasgow. Educated at Leeds and Heidelberg Universities. Commercial lawyer. MEP for Scotland since 2004.
portrait
George Lyon (Liberal Democrat) Born 1956, Rothesay. Educated at Rothesay Academy. Farmer. MSP for Argyll and Bute 1999-2007. Deputy Minister for Finance and Parliamentary business in the Scottish executive 2005-2007.
portrait
Catherine Stihler (Labour) Born 1973, Bellshill. Educated at Coltness High School and St Andrews University. Former researcher for Anne Begg. MEP for Scotland since 1999. Contested Angus 1997, Dunfermline and West Fife by-election 2006.
Comments - 715 Responses on “Europe Scotland”
  1. I believe it was Panelbase and it was 54% after don’t knows were reallocated. My guess is that if the SNP are still riding high on pandemic unity that a Referendum will be in the manifesto next year. Assuming a nationalist majority is elected then we’ll see the Scottish Government take on Boris who has made it clear he’ll agree to no referendum. The next step probably will be for the SNP to call a referendum without tge consent of the British Parliament and the government will encourage abstention.

  2. The attitude of the EU will be crucial IMO.

    If they assure an independent Scotland that they will quickly accede into the EU umbrella then it will soothe many of the economic concerns (though having to join the Euro might be a sticking point).

    If such reassurance is not forthcoming, and Boris tries to convince the public that an independent Scotland won’t be allowed to use the pound, then vast swathes of the population will be worried that their salaries and pensions will be paid in valueless Scottish Groats. Given the collapsed oil market I can’t see Middle Scotland voting for independence in that scenario.

  3. I’m not convinced economic arguments have any real cut-through in these kinds of debates. Increasingly politics in the West seems to be about identifying who the Bad People are. Almost every political movement of the last five to ten years, whether it’s right-wing, left-wing or something else, fits this mould.

    For example, climate change is intrinsically a dry, technical issue – people who wish to avert it ought to be spending their time researching molten salt reactors and tradable carbon credits. Instead, it the cause has been rebranded as “climate justice” by Extinction Rebellion and similar groups, who have decided that climate change is caused by Bad People who do Bad Things, and therefore the way you defeat climate change is to replace them with Good People who do Good Things.

    The above framing is severely flawed, of course, but I’m getting off topic. The point is that it is an incredibly useful framing to Extinction Rebellion which has allowed them to gain much support, by diverting people’s pre-existing fears for the future onto a target they can attack, which is much easier than solving the underlying problem.

    Such a framing is also incredibly useful for the Scottish Independence movement. Conversations between nationalists and unionists seem to tonight past one another. Unionists fixate on GERS figures, and point out that Scots get almost £2k per capita per year more out of the Treasury than they put in; nationalists talk about how awful Boris Johnson is and how Scotland never voted for him.

    Both are right, but they are talking about different things. Obviously, me not being Scottish, it’s somewhat different, but given I’m a solutions person rather than a morality person, I suspect I’d be a unionist even if I’d been born in Scotland. But, increasingly, that is not the battleground that politics is fought on. Never forget how heavily the AV referendum was lost because campaigners turned the referendum question into “Do you like Nick Clegg?” If Sturgeon could similarly turn an indyref2 question into “Do you like Boris Johnson?” then the union is toast.

  4. Richard Leonard has resigned as Scottish Labour leader.

    Inevitable, and probably irrelevant too, at least in terms of the one question which all of Scottish politics revolves around. To be fair to Leonard, he had an impossible job anyway, and so equally it’s impossible to judge how well he did.

  5. Oh, in terms of that oh-so-vital question, the latest poll (via Comres) has Yes leading by 57-43 once the don’t knows are removed. I think that may be a new record but leads for Yes greater than the margin of error have been the norm for months now.

  6. So for the first time in quite a while, No leads in a poll (from Comres):

    Yes 48
    No 52

    Somewhat poetically this came in the same weekend as Rangers’ first Scottish Premier League victory for a decade.

  7. Caveat from Sir John Curtice of University of Strathclyde. This poll was published without being weighted based on previous voting intentions. Before don’t knows are reallocated the numbers were 46 Yes 47 No which is actually unchanged from the last poll and then it was 50 50 after don’t knows were reallocated. Therefore it will actually be a few weeks before we lnow whether this is a no lead after don’t knows are reallocated because ComRes do not publish their tables straight away and British Polling Council gives them two weeks before they have to

  8. The bigger question is obviously whether the damage to the separatist cause is permanent. Logically, it shouldn’t be, but voters aren’t logical, and on a personal note I feel it’s about time that some of that illogicality flattered my own preferences.

  9. https://lordashcroftpolls.com/2021/04/my-new-scottish-research-finds-independence-in-the-balance/

    Loads to dig through here, but the statistic that stands out to me is that 78% of independence supporters believe the straight-up lie that the fiscal transfer points from Scotland to rUK. Two things to note about this:

    1) this is one of the clearest cases of people starting with their opinions and then deciding the facts that I have ever seen

    2) if the majority of indy voters are voting to avoid having to share what they believe is above-average prosperity, can Scottish independence really claim to be a social democratic project?

  10. Polltroll

    Agree – any ‘economy with the truth’ from Brexiters and Bremainers during the EU referendum campaign, pale into insignificance compared to the house of cards the (economic) case for Scottish Independence is made up on.

  11. It’s somewhat different. There’s no ScotNat example as tangible and salient as £350 million on the side if a bus, the SNP approach is more misdirection/changing the subject/whataboutery than straight-up lying. But it has had the same effect either way, of leading large numbers of Scots to believe demonstrable falsehoods.

  12. Maybe.

    In any case, just because it’s more subtle and makes headlines harder to create (no doubt as planned), doesn’t mean the magnitude of the Nats’ misleadings doesn’t dwarf any lies/distortion of the EU ref campaign.

  13. “There’s no ScotNat example as tangible and salient as £350 million on the side if a bus”

    There’s a whole bus garage full of them.

    – We will quickly be able to rejoin the EU
    – There would be no hard border with England
    – We would still be able to keep the pound
    – We wouldn’t have to commit to joining the Euro
    – We won’t have to take our share of the UK national debt
    – The UK government will be obliged to pay Scottish pensions
    – plenty more if I think a bit harder

    None of them will come home to roost this side of independence though

  14. Okay, I guess what I meant is that there are plenty of lies, but that those lies come out when they’re put on the defensive in interviews debates, etc. They’re the answers to questions they’d rather not be asked. But the lies aren’t their front-and-centre campaigning messages (if only because their main campaigning themes rely solely on emotion rather than actual arguments).

    Maybe this isn’t a meaningful difference.

  15. Fascinating the differences between different pollsters in their ‘final call’ polls for Scotland:

    Constituency: 17%-32% lead for SNP (varies whether Con or Lab in 2nd)

    Regional: 11-18% lead for SNP (Con consistently shown 2nd)

    There’s unfortunately a definite chance SNP could gain a majority from constituencies vote alone, regardless of how much their regional vote share falls.

    And that’s before you factor in the pro-Independence Greens, who are likely to reach seat numbers in double figures.

Leave a Reply

NB: Before commenting please make sure you are familiar with the Comments Policy. UKPollingReport is a site for non-partisan discussion of polls.

You are not currently logged into UKPollingReport. Registration is not compulsory, but is strongly encouraged. Either login here, or register here (commenters who have previously registered on the Constituency Guide section of the site *should* be able to use their existing login)