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Richmond (Yorks)

2010 Results:
Conservative: 33541 (62.8%)
Liberal Democrat: 10205 (19.1%)
Labour: 8150 (15.3%)
Green: 1516 (2.8%)
Majority: 23336 (43.7%)

Notional 2005 Results:
Conservative: 30668 (59.3%)
Labour: 10546 (20.4%)
Liberal Democrat: 8955 (17.3%)
Other: 1581 (3.1%)
Majority: 20122 (38.9%)

Actual 2005 result
Conservative: 26722 (59.1%)
Labour: 8915 (19.7%)
Liberal Democrat: 7982 (17.7%)
Green: 1581 (3.5%)
Majority: 17807 (39.4%)

2001 Result
Conservative: 25951 (58.9%)
Labour: 9632 (21.9%)
Liberal Democrat: 7890 (17.9%)
Other: 561 (1.3%)
Majority: 16319 (37.1%)

1997 Result
Conservative: 23326 (48.9%)
Labour: 13275 (27.8%)
Liberal Democrat: 8773 (18.4%)
Referendum: 2367 (5%)
Majority: 10051 (21.1%)

Boundary changes: Richmond gains the Bedale, Tanfield, Leeming and Crakehall wards from the dismembered Vale of York seat.

Profile: a geographically huge seat, covering a vast swathe of rural North Yorkshire, including much of the Yorkshire Dales national park, including Swaledale and Wensleydale, and part of the North Yorkshire Moors to the East. Most of the constituency is small villages and hamlets – the only towns are Northallerton, Richmond and Stokesley and Leyburn. The local economy relies upon agriculture and tourism, though the constituency also includes the army base at Catterick Garrison.

While Richmond is now one of the safest Conservative seats in the country, it was only narrowly by William Hague in the 1989 by-election that originally returned him to Parliament, with only the split between the SLD and the continuing SDP seeing Hague home safely.

portraitCurrent MP: William Hague (Conservative) born 1961, Rotherham. Educated at Wath-upon-Dearne comprehensive and Oxford University. Worked as a management consultant prior to becoming an MP. Contested Wentworth in 1987 and was first elected to Parliament in the 1989 Richmond by-election. Served in several junionr positions, including Minister for the Disabled, before entering the cabinet as Secretary of State for Wales in 1995. Following the Conservative party defeat in 1997 Hague was elected Party leader. Despite being lauded for his oratorical skills in Parliament, Hague was mocked for stunts such as wearing baseball caps and suffered infighting within the Parliamentary Conservative party. Following initial attempts to modernise the Conservative party, including giving party members to right to elect the party leader, Hague eventually went into the 2001 election with an emphasis on traditional Conservative themes, particularly opposition to the single currency. The Conservatives suffered a second massive defeat, only increasing their number of MPs by 1. Hague resigned following the defeat and withdrew from frontline politics, instead appearing on television programmes and writing a biography of William Pitt the Younger. Following David Cameron`s election as Conservative party leader he returned to the Conservative front bench as Shadow Foriegn Secretary and “deputy leader in all but name”. Foreign Secretary since 2010 (more information at They work for you)

2010 election candidates:
portraitWilliam Hague(Conservative) born 1961, Rotherham. Educated at Wath-upon-Dearne comprehensive and Oxford University. Worked as a management consultant prior to becoming an MP. Contested Wentworth in 1987 and was first elected to Parliament in the 1989 Richmond by-election. Served in several junionr positions, including Minister for the Disabled, before entering the cabinet as Secretary of State for Wales in 1995. Following the Conservative party defeat in 1997 Hague was elected Party leader. Despite being lauded for his oratorical skills in Parliament, Hague was mocked for stunts such as wearing baseball caps and suffered infighting within the Parliamentary Conservative party. Following initial attempts to modernise the Conservative party, including giving party members to right to elect the party leader, Hague eventually went into the 2001 election with an emphasis on traditional Conservative themes, particularly opposition to the single currency. The Conservatives suffered a second massive defeat, only increasing their number of MPs by 1. Hague resigned following the defeat and withdrew from frontline politics, instead appearing on television programmes and writing a biography of William Pitt the Younger. Following David Cameron`s election as Conservative party leader he returned to the Conservative front bench as Shadow Foriegn Secretary and “deputy leader in all but name”.
portraitEileen Driver (Labour) Retired teacher.
portrait Lawrence Meredith (Liberal Democrat) Born Yorkshire. Educated at Bradford University and Oxford University. Works for the European Commission.
portraitLeslie Rowe (Green) Accountant. Contested Croydon North West 1987, Ealing Acton 1992 for the Liberal Democrats, Richmond (Yorks) 2005 and Yorkshire and Humber 2009 European elections for the Green party.

2001 Census Demographics

Total 2001 Population: 99688
Male: 50.2%
Female: 49.8%
Under 18: 21.9%
Over 60: 22.1%
Born outside UK: 4.5%
White: 98.7%
Asian: 0.5%
Mixed: 0.5%
Other: 0.2%
Christian: 82.4%
Full time students: 1.7%
Graduates 16-74: 21.7%
No Qualifications 16-74: 24.4%
Owner-Occupied: 70%
Social Housing: 13.2% (Council: 4.9%, Housing Ass.: 8.3%)
Privately Rented: 8.8%
Homes without central heating and/or private bathroom: 4.3%

NB - The constituency guide is now archived and is no longer being updated. The new guide is at http://ukpollingreport.co.uk/2015guide