The UKPollingReport election guide for 2010 has now been archived and all comments will shortly be closed. The new Election Guide for the 2015 election is now online at http://ukpollingreport.co.uk/2015guide. The old site is archived at the UK Web Archive.
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Newcastle upon Tyne Central

2010 Results:
Conservative: 6611 (19.35%)
Labour: 15694 (45.95%)
Liberal Democrat: 8228 (24.09%)
BNP: 2302 (6.74%)
UKIP: 754 (2.21%)
Green: 568 (1.66%)
Majority: 7466 (21.86%)

Notional 2005 Results:
Labour: 16800 (51.7%)
Liberal Democrat: 8294 (25.5%)
Conservative: 5746 (17.7%)
Other: 1643 (5.1%)
Majority: 8506 (26.2%)

Actual 2005 result
Conservative: 5749 (16.0%)
Labour: 16211 (45.1%)
Liberal Democrat: 12229 (34.0%)
Other: 1731 (4.8%)
Majority: 3982 (11.1%)

2001 Result
Conservative: 7414 (21.3%)
Labour: 19169 (55%)
Liberal Democrat: 7564 (21.7%)
Other: 723 (2.1%)
Majority: 11605 (33.3%)

1997 Result
Conservative: 10792 (23.4%)
Labour: 27272 (59.2%)
Liberal Democrat: 6911 (15%)
Referendum: 1113 (2.4%)
Majority: 16480 (35.8%)

Boundary changes:

Profile:

portraitCurrent MP: Chinyelu Susan Onwurah (Labour) Born Wallsend. Educated at Kenton Comprehensive. Chartered engineer working for Ofcom.

2010 election candidates:
portraitNick Holder (Conservative) Runs a consultancy business.
portraitChinyelu Susan Onwurah (Labour) Born Wallsend. Educated at Kenton Comprehensive. Chartered engineer working for Ofcom.
portraitGareth Kane (Liberal Democrat) born 1971, Northern Ireland. Educated at Methodist college Belfast and Cambridge University. Manager of an environmental research centre at Teesside University. Newcastle city councillor. Contested Sunderland South in 2005.
portraitJohn Pearson (Green)
portraitMartin Davies (UKIP)
portraitKen Booth (BNP) Defected from the National Front in 2005. Contested North East region in 2009 European elections.

2001 Census Demographics

Total 2001 Population: 84752
Male: 48.7%
Female: 51.3%
Under 18: 18.3%
Over 60: 18.7%
Born outside UK: 7.1%
White: 94.1%
Black: 0.4%
Asian: 3.2%
Mixed: 0.9%
Other: 1.4%
Christian: 68.7%
Hindu: 0.7%
Muslim: 2.4%
Full time students: 18%
Graduates 16-74: 24.9%
No Qualifications 16-74: 28.5%
Owner-Occupied: 47.2%
Social Housing: 35% (Council: 30.1%, Housing Ass.: 4.8%)
Privately Rented: 15.2%
Homes without central heating and/or private bathroom: 5.9%

NB - The constituency guide is now archived and is no longer being updated. The new guide is at http://ukpollingreport.co.uk/2015guide

119 Responses to “Newcastle upon Tyne Central”

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  1. I must say I’m not surprised that HH sees nothing wrong.

    But speaking for myself I think our political overclass needs to experience some more of the ‘everyday life’ we plebs have.

    As to this case I do find it amusing that so many Labour politicians who were playing class war games this week are yet again following their usual practice of ‘do as I say not as I do’.

  2. In terms of all the property flipping and renting flats to each other – I completely agree with you both.

    However I don’t think travelling 1st class is inappropriate for those MPs hundreds of miles from London.

    If my MP in Beckenham was travelling first class into London on a 20 minute journey then that would be different.

  3. I’ve only ever travelled once in first class.

    Not by choice but because there weren’t any standard seats left.

    Not only was it more expensive but it almost led to disaster on the return journey.

  4. I think, once again, The Results is somewhat off-beam…..I agree with HH. There have been some shocking examples of MP’s fiddling expenses, but this doesn’t appear to be it.

    The last two companies I have worked for have given employees the right to travel first class on journeys of more than two hours – and I have a low to middle management job, nothing fancy or privileged. Given this, it doesn’t seem unreasonable for MPs to travel first class on similar journies.

    Apart from anything else, they are more likely to be able to work effectively in first class. My most regular commutes are into London in standard class and with everyone packed in it’s often difficult to work – surely we’d rather MP’s spent long journeys working on constituency case work or scrutinizing legislation?

  5. At last some common sense.

  6. ”I think, once again, The Results is somewhat off-beam…..I agree with HH. There have been some shocking examples of MP’s fiddling expenses, but this doesn’t appear to be it.”

    Chris K, I didn’t suggest for one moment that it was the worst example of it. Every time you come on here you seem to habitually slag me off.

  7. I have to say it is profoundly depressing that political discourse in this country has become dominated by the undoubted snobbery of people like Andrew Mitchell on one side of the debate, and by the kind of petty inverted snobbery regularly posted on here by Richard on the other side.

    Where is the commonsense in the middle.

    I for one am glad to be leaving the UK (I’m moving to Switzerland in January). I have to say I won’t be sorry to leave the inverted snobs and their beloved 45% income tax behind. This country is finished.

  8. Hemmelig, I know where you are coming from but I think what Richard is trying to say is that he doesn’t agree with First Class- Is that a crime?

  9. “I have to say I won’t be sorry to leave the inverted snobs and their beloved 45% income tax behind”

    I think you’ll find that the 45% income tax was the choice of Cameron, Clegg and Osborne.

    Although I have read that Osborne wanted 40% and a mansion tax – which would have been my choice.

  10. I’ve nothing against first class as a concept.

    But if politicians want it they should pay the extra themselves.

  11. It brings to mind Nicholas Winterton and his frankly divisive comments about First Class shortly before he retired from Parliament.

  12. The Results – I didn’t suggest you thought it was the worst, but you did post a comment about MP’s not learning underneath a post suggesting that this MP had her nose in the trough.

    And as for ‘habitual slagging off” – I think saying “once again, somewhat off-beam” is hardly the most offensive term!! I’d also point out that I am not the only one who has raised eyebrows at your comments (ref various comments from other posters over the last few weeks).

    But perhaps I’m being unfair on you….to this end, I read on Bristol West that you think Labour will take it perhaps narrowly, but more likely with a comfortable majority in 2015. As a genuine question – what factors have you based that prediction on?

  13. “This country is finished”

    Don’t be ridiculous.

    Although I agree with your first paragraph.

  14. re Bristol West – it’s certainly possible the Lib Dems will lose, but if they do so it will be an appalling night for them with other similarly safe seats like Hornsey and Bermondsey likely to be lost as well.

    The Results believes in that kind of outcome for the next election – on balance I think he is being too pessimistic for the Lib Dems.

    Sure they will lose a ream of more marginal seats back to Labour but seats like Bristol West with 10000+ majorities are I think safe enough for the Libs to narrowly hold.

  15. JJB

    If the UK does not address its tax competitiveness and the general hostility to wealth creators that prevails in public opinion today then in terms of being a hub for global business, an international stock exchange and a leading centre of financial services, the UK will be finished.

    Just as we would have been finished in the 1980s if Mrs T hadn’t sorted out the unions and dragged us into a globally competitive position.

    I hope I’m wrong.

  16. ”I read on Bristol West that you think Labour will take it perhaps narrowly, but more likely with a comfortable majority in 2015. As a genuine question – what factors have you based that prediction on?”

    As has already been said on here, there was a massive Anti-Labour vote at the 2005 and 2010 General Elections in Bristol West. Williams seems like a decent enough chap but if the Lib Dem vote collapses here then there is a chance that Labour will narrowly win it back.

  17. Also Chris K there is a large student vote in Bristol West, and a good deal of that large student vote aren’t going to be happy with the Lib Dems in Coalition for obvious reasons- Tuition fees, EMA etc. etc. In other words, the Lib Dems in government with the Tories won’t go down well at all in a city like Bristol.

  18. Students
    (a) usually don’t vote
    (b) are often registered in their home constituency
    (c) mostly don’t base the way they vote based on a minority of irritating noisy protesters

    Of much more importance in university seats are the thousands and thousands of university employees. However I don’t think they will be important enough here to eliminate a 10,000 majority all on their own. Somewhere like Cambridge might be a different matter.

  19. The Muslim population of Newcastle council increased from 3.6% to 6.3% between 2001 and 2011.

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