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Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath

2010 Results:
Conservative: 4258 (9.3%)
Labour: 29559 (64.54%)
Liberal Democrat: 4269 (9.32%)
SNP: 6550 (14.3%)
UKIP: 760 (1.66%)
Independent: 349 (0.76%)
Others: 57 (0.12%)
Majority: 23009 (50.24%)

2005 Results:
Labour: 24278 (58.1%)
SNP: 6062 (14.5%)
Liberal Democrat: 5450 (13%)
Conservative: 4308 (10.3%)
Other: 1698 (4.1%)
Majority: 18216 (43.6%)

Boundary changes prior to 2005 election: Name of seat changed from Kirkcaldy.

2001 Result
Conservative: 3013 (10.7%)
Labour: 15227 (54.1%)
Liberal Democrat: 2849 (10.1%)
SNP: 6264 (22.2%)
Other: 804 (2.9%)
Majority: 8963 (31.8%)

1997 Result
Conservative: 4779 (13.7%)
Labour: 18730 (53.6%)
Liberal Democrat: 3031 (8.7%)
SNP: 8020 (22.9%)
Referendum: 413 (1.2%)
Majority: 10710 (30.6%)

No Boundary Changes:

Profile:

portraitCurrent MP: Gordon Brown(Labour) born 1951, Giffnoch, the son of a Church of Scotland minister. Educated at Kirkcaldy High School and the University of Edinburgh. Elected Rector of Edinburgh University in 1972 while still a student. Worked as a lecturer and television journalist prior to his election as an MP. Contested Edinburgh South 1979. First elected as MP for Dunfermline East in 1983. Became a shadow spokesman on Trade and Industry in 1985, shadow chief secretary in 1987, shadow secretary of state for trade and industry in 1989 and shadow chancellor in 1992. Gordon Brown had been tipped as a potential future leader of the party prior to the death of John Smith. In the event Brown chose not to contest the leadership, reputed after an agreement with Tony Blair, sealed at the Granita restaurant, that only one of the two men should stand, and that in return Brown would receive control of economic policy. Brown became Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1997, he first act being to give the Bank of England independence. He initially followed Conservative spending commitments, a hangover from Labour`s period of opposition when they were keen to neutralise the reputation of being tax raisers, and later governing according to a `golden rule` of borrowing only to invest over the economic cycle. Opponents accused Brown of significantly raising taxes during his tenure as Chancellor, largely through `stealth` taxation. The rivalry between Brown and Blair was a defining feature of the Blair premiership, characterised by behind the scene briefings. Brown, with his public image of being a dour, prudent, uncharismatic Scotsman forever waiting for his chance at power, was famously described by an unnamed source – widely assumed to be Alistair Campbell – of being `psychologically flawed`. For many years the media speculated that those around Tony Blair wished to block Gordon Brown`s succession as Prime Minister, with such figures as Alan Milburn, John Reid and David Miliband being mooted as alternatives to Brown at various points. In the event Gordon Brown was the only candidate to secure enough nominations to stand, and he became Labour leader, and hence Prime Minister, without a contest in June 2007 (more information at They work for you)

2010 election candidates:
portraitLindsay Paterson (Conservative) Educated at St Andrews University. Editor for a publishing company. Contested Livingston 2003 Scottish election, Coatbridge, Chryston and Bellshill 2005.
portraitGordon Brown(Labour) born 1951, Giffnoch, the son of a Church of Scotland minister. Educated at Kirkcaldy High School and the University of Edinburgh. Elected Rector of Edinburgh University in 1972 while still a student. Worked as a lecturer and television journalist prior to his election as an MP. Contested Edinburgh South 1979. First elected as MP for Dunfermline East in 1983. Became a shadow spokesman on Trade and Industry in 1985, shadow chief secretary in 1987, shadow secretary of state for trade and industry in 1989 and shadow chancellor in 1992. Gordon Brown had been tipped as a potential future leader of the party prior to the death of John Smith. In the event Brown chose not to contest the leadership, reputed after an agreement with Tony Blair, sealed at the Granita restaurant, that only one of the two men should stand, and that in return Brown would receive control of economic policy. Brown became Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1997, he first act being to give the Bank of England independence. He initially followed Conservative spending commitments, a hangover from Labour`s period of opposition when they were keen to neutralise the reputation of being tax raisers, and later governing according to a `golden rule` of borrowing only to invest over the economic cycle. Opponents accused Brown of significantly raising taxes during his tenure as Chancellor, largely through `stealth` taxation. The rivalry between Brown and Blair was a defining feature of the Blair premiership, characterised by behind the scene briefings. Brown, with his public image of being a dour, prudent, uncharismatic Scotsman forever waiting for his chance at power, was famously described by an unnamed source – widely assumed to be Alistair Campbell – of being `psychologically flawed`. For many years the media speculated that those around Tony Blair wished to block Gordon Brown`s succession as Prime Minister, with such figures as Alan Milburn, John Reid and David Miliband being mooted as alternatives to Brown at various points. In the event Gordon Brown was the only candidate to secure enough nominations to stand, and he became Labour leader, and hence Prime Minister, without a contest in June 2007. Prime Minister between 2007-2010, a period dominated by economic crisis, he stepped down as PM and Labour leader following Labour`s defeat in the 2010 election (more information at They work for you)
portraitJohn Mainland (Liberal Democrat) Educated at Kirkcaldy High School and Dundee University. Local government housing officer. Contested Kirkcaldy 1997, 1999 Scottish elections, Dunfermline East 2001.
portraitDouglas Chapman (SNP) Fife councillor. Contested Dunfermline West 1999 Scottish election, Dunfermline and West Fife 2005.
portraitPeter Adams (UKIP) Retired army officer.
portraitDerek Leslie Jackson (Land is Power) Comedian
portraitDonald MacLaren of MacLaren (Independent) Chief of the clan MacLaren. Former British Ambassador to Georgia.
portraitSusan Archibald (Independent) Disability rights campaigner and former road sweeper.

2001 Census Demographics

Total 2001 Population: 93273
Male: 47.9%
Female: 52.1%
Under 18: 23.2%
Over 60: 22.5%
Born outside UK: 2.7%
White: 98.7%
Black: 0.2%
Asian: 0.7%
Mixed: 0.2%
Other: 0.3%
Christian: 57.4%
Graduates 16-74: 16.2%
No Qualifications 16-74: 35.1%
Owner-Occupied: 62%
Social Housing: 30.9% (Council: 29%, Housing Ass.: 1.9%)
Privately Rented: 3.2%
Homes without central heating and/or private bathroom: 2.3%

NB - The constituency guide is now archived and is no longer being updated. The new guide is at http://ukpollingreport.co.uk/2015guide