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Hackney North and Stoke Newington

2010 Results:
Conservative: 6759 (14.54%)
Labour: 25553 (54.97%)
Liberal Democrat: 11092 (23.86%)
Green: 2133 (4.59%)
Christian: 299 (0.64%)
Monster Raving Loony: 182 (0.39%)
Independent: 157 (0.34%)
Others: 313 (0.67%)
Majority: 14461 (31.11%)

Notional 2005 Results:
Labour: 14761 (48.6%)
Liberal Democrat: 7041 (23.2%)
Conservative: 4360 (14.3%)
Other: 4227 (14.0%)
Majority: 7720 (25.4%)

Actual 2005 result
Conservative: 4218 (14.4%)
Labour: 14268 (48.6%)
Liberal Democrat: 6841 (23.3%)
Green: 2907 (9.9%)
Other: 1146 (3.9%)
Majority: 7427 (25.3%)

2001 Result
Conservative: 4430 (15%)
Labour: 18081 (61%)
Liberal Democrat: 4170 (14.1%)
Green: 2184 (7.4%)
Other: 756 (2.6%)
Majority: 13651 (46.1%)

1997 Result
Conservative: 5483 (16.7%)
Labour: 21110 (64.3%)
Liberal Democrat: 3806 (11.6%)
Referendum: 544 (1.7%)
Other: 1909 (5.8%)
Majority: 15627 (47.6%)

Boundary changes: Despite their small size, the Hackney seats undergo only minor changes to bring them into line with ward boundaries.

Profile: A highly cosmopolitian and multi ethnic seat covering Stoke Newington, Clapton and Hackney Downs. This seat has one of the ten highest proportions of black residents, a significant Muslim population and also one of the highest Jewish populations because of the densely packed ultra-orthodox Hassidic Jewish community around Stamford Hill, one of the pockets of strength of the Conservative party in the seat, at least at local elections. Stamford Hill aside this is a Labour seat, there are the beginnings of gentrification and private house prices are rocketing, but this is mostly a seat of council and social housing, of estates, tower blocks, deprivation, high crime and drug problems. Unsurprisingly it is a solid Labour seat, the small electorate and low turnout mean Diane Abbott`s seven and a half thousand majority is actually over 25 percent. There is a relatively strong showing by the Greens here, who took almost 10% of the vote, their third highest in the country in 2005.

portraitCurrent MP: Diane Abbott(Labour) born 1953, Paddington to a Jamacian family. Educated at Harrow County Grammar School and Cambridge University. Former civil servant, TV-AM television reporter and Lambeth council press officer. First elected as MP for Hackney North and Stoke Newington in 1987, one of the first black MPs elected in almost 70 years. She is a left winger and a regular rebel against the Labour whip, opposing Iraq, foundation hospitals, top-up fees and 90 day detention – she attracted criticism from other left wing MPs though for her decision to send her son to a private school. A seasoned media performer, she has branched out into television and regularly appears on the BBC`s week politics show This Week in a double act with Michael Portillo (more information at They work for you)

2010 election candidates:
portraitDarren Caplan (Conservative) Educated at Birmingham University. Former central office staffer, now a Public affairs director. Married to Conservative commentator and author Jo-Anne Nadler.
portraitDiane Abbott(Labour) born 1953, Paddington to a Jamacian family. Educated at Harrow County Grammar School and Cambridge University. Former civil servant, TV-AM television reporter and Lambeth council press officer. First elected as MP for Hackney North and Stoke Newington in 1987, one of the first black MPs elected in almost 70 years. She is a left winger and a regular rebel against the Labour whip, opposing Iraq, foundation hospitals, top-up fees and 90 day detention – she attracted criticism from other left wing MPs though for her decision to send her son to a private school. A seasoned media performer, she has branched out into television and regularly appears on the BBC`s week politics show This Week in a double act with Michael Portillo (more information at They work for you)
portraitKeith Angus (Liberal Democrat) Educated at the Open University. Project manager for the Royal Bank of Canada.
portraitMatt Sellwood (Green) Former Oxford councillor.
portraitMaxine Hargreaves (Christian Party)
portraitKnigel Knapp (Official Monster Raving Loony)
portraitJack Pope-de-Locksley (Magna Carta)
portraitSuzanne Moore (Independent)
portraitPaul Shaer (Independent)
portraitAlessandra Williams (Independent)

2001 Census Demographics

Total 2001 Population: 106555
Male: 47.9%
Female: 52.1%
Under 18: 26.9%
Over 60: 11.7%
Born outside UK: 34.3%
White: 61%
Black: 21.8%
Asian: 10.3%
Mixed: 4%
Other: 2.9%
Christian: 39.8%
Hindu: 0.9%
Jewish: 9%
Muslim: 14.5%
Sikh: 1.1%
Full time students: 8.2%
Graduates 16-74: 35.6%
No Qualifications 16-74: 27.4%
Owner-Occupied: 36.6%
Social Housing: 43.3% (Council: 25.3%, Housing Ass.: 18.1%)
Privately Rented: 17.5%
Homes without central heating and/or private bathroom: 10.4%

NB - The constituency guide is now archived and is no longer being updated. The new guide is at http://ukpollingreport.co.uk/2015guide

230 Responses to “Hackney North and Stoke Newington”

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  1. When Ernie Roberts was elected here in 1979 aged 67 he must have been one of the ‘oldest’ freshman MP’s.He was Labour PPC candidate for Stockport back in 1955.

  2. Yes he may have been the oldest. Being so advanced in years at the start of his parliamentary career was always going to increase the chances of a challenge from the new multicultural left-wing in Hackney which is exactly what happened.

  3. Diane Abbott has gone very quiet since losing the Labour leadership election and becoming a shadow minister. This Week isn’t anywhere near as good without her.

    I can’t understand why she gave up her media profile to become an invisible junior shadow minister for paperclips. It was a mistake.

  4. The Boundary Commission have proposed a new Hackney North constituency which will include the Seven Sisters ward currently in the Tottenham constituency. This new constituency had a December 2010 electorate of 80,473 which is the absolute maximum allowable under the new rules.

  5. Diane Abbot being elected for the first time in 1987:

    htttp://www.itnsource.com/shotlist//ITN/1987/06/11/AS110687036

  6. Diane has been making some more ‘race related’ remarks, this time blaming taxi drivers in London for not stopping for Black people. If Ed has any sense he should get rd of this lady. After 25 years as an MP she should know better than make remarks like this.

  7. As a fairly right wing Conservative
    who hates political correctness
    and the malign social effects and self defeating victim culture it creates,
    I have to come to Diane Abbot’s defence.

    I don’t want to get into a situation where elected politicians are thwarted down for a silly mistake on Twitter.

    Two wrongs don’t……

    She shouldn’t resign.
    Aidan Burley shouldn’t resign.
    Jeremy Clarkson shouldn’t resign.

  8. The trouble is that she has form on such issues and frequently says silly comments re race. Now if she said this comment out of isolation them yes I would agree with Joe James, but the fact is that she constantly says such comments and I think the comments re taxi drivers is a step too far and she ought to resign. The more worrying issue from Labour’s POV is the weak leadership of Ed Miliband in dealing with this matter more swiftly. If a white person made such racial comments then I guarantee Diane Abbott (and Ed Miliband) would be the first to demand a resignation with the left leaning media having kittens. Just because a Labour politician does or says something bad, then as Shaun alluded to, then that makes everything OK and the matter is closed down, but if a non Labour politician says such a thing then it’s such a big deal.

  9. Joseph, I do agree with you that all those things would happen if the boot was on the other foot,
    but I would rather rise above it.

    It’s really for the Labour Party to decide whether or not she is out of tune with collective responsibility as a whole to be on the front bench.

  10. The problem is Abbott herself would be among the first to scream for resignation and worse if someone else were to cross the line she just has. On that basis alone she should resign.

  11. Pingback: [BLOCKED BY STBV] Guido Fawkes: dictators, racism and hypocrisy | Guy Debord's Cat

  12. I’ve just noticed the 1977 GLC result in this constituency.

    Labour (with a K Livingstone as candiate) got 53.6% of the vote and a 22% majority.

    But in 1979 Labour only got 51.6% of the vote and a 18.3% majority.

    Was there anywhere else where Labour did better in 1977 than in 1979?

  13. Ken Livingstone fought & won 3 different constituencies in the final 3 GLC main elections; he moved from Norwood to this seat because it was safer, then moved to Paddington, which was close to his home, because he either wanted to be leader or not on the council at all. Gerry Ross won this seat in the final GLC election. Thus Livingstone stood in Brent E, within whose former boundaries he still lives, and 2 different neighbouring constituencies, Paddington & Hampstead, in different forms of election. My distant cousin (though I knew him pretty well) Arnold Kinzley was a Tory GLC member elected in 1977 for Ilford S, but he lost it to Labour in 1981. Several future MPs were elected in that election, mainly Labour but also including Marion Roe, elected for Ilford N. Edward Leigh however lost Richmond to Adrian Slade of the Liberal Alliance.
    I don’t know the answer to your question Richard but in general Labour did rather better, not for the last time, in inner rather than outer London in 1977. For example Holborn & St Pancras S was held, which wasn’t safe Labour at the time.

  14. RE Livingstone his result was shown by the BBC during their coverage of the 1987 election. The BBC that year seemed to make a point of covering London constituencies perceived to have been effected by the so-called Loony Left Labour councils. The swing to the Tories in London was ont

  15. The swing to the Tories in London was not just because of the loony left. Given that Thatcher had her base in Finchley her being an MP for a London seat must havehad some effect in London in 87.

  16. I don;t think thats likely to have been a significant factor really. Party leaders can and do achieve boosts in their region if there is a strong regional identity (eg Gordon Brown in Scotland in 2010, Charles Kennedy the same in 2005, William Hague in Yorkshire in 2001) but London is probably a bit different in this respect and Mrs Thatcher was not a ‘native’ Londoner anyway. Furthermore 1987 was her third election as leader so anybody liable to have swung their vote to the Conservatives on that kind of basis would have already done so in 1979 or 1983. Remember also that the swing in London wasn’t uniform – that a small swing to the Conservatives overall masked some huge swings in some areas and some swings to Labour in other areas. Finchley was one seat which did see a small swing to Labour (although NMrs T increased her own voite share) and a couple of Labour’s relatively good performances came in nearby seats such as Hamsptead and Hornsey. Most of the big swings to the Conservatives were explicable by either unpopular Labour councils (eg Ealing North, Walthamstow) or unpopular candidates or both (Brent East, Tottenham) or demographic change (Battersea).
    That said although there were pro-Labour swings in seats neighbouring Finchley to the south and east, there were very good Conservative results in both Hendon seats and in Harrow. Its possible that Mrs Thatcher had some bearing on this. I don’t relaly have evidence for it but I suspect the results there had much to do with the solidifying of the Jewish vote behind the Conservatives and Mrs T can take much credit for that

  17. As a result though the swing to Labour in London was consequently above the national average in 1992 I think. There were increased majorities for John Bowis and David Mellor in their respective Wandsworth constituencies of Battersea and Putney though.

  18. Yes that’s clearly true. There were quite numerous Labour gains in London in 1992, some achieved with quite high swings such as Lewisham E. The swing to the Tories in Putney was in fact negligible though it was quite large in Battersea. Of the seats which Labour gained in that election, almost all now seem lost for good; the only exception is Hampstead & Highgate which could well have been a Tory gain in 2010 had it not been for the boundary change.

  19. ” he moved from Norwood to this seat because it was safer, then moved to Paddington, which was close to his home, because he either wanted to be leader or not on the council at all. ”

    A nice historical ‘what-if’ presents itself here.

    What if Ken had returned to Norwood in 1981 and been beaten?

    Would he ever have amounted to anything important?

    Would the GLC have been abolished?

    Would Boris have been needed as an ‘all or nothing’ Conservative mayoral candidate?

  20. Stoke Newington
    1935 Con 11,213
    Lab 7,448
    Lib 2,364
    Con Majority 3,765

    1945 Lab 9,356
    Con 5,155
    Lib 3,651
    Lab Majority 4,201

    Swing 20.52% Con to Lab

    A gargantuan drop in Tory support

  21. Sure, but not as much as the Christchurch by-election, or Labour in the Bermondsey by-election. The biggest drops ever in support were for Independent Labour Party candidates just after 1945 – their share fell 60.6% in Glasgow Bridgeton from 1945 to 1950.

  22. There was massive social change in most of what we would now term London’s inner suburbs during the war years; the Tories before WWII were able to win in a number of seats which subsequently became impossible for them, in areas such as Islington, Peckham and plenty more. In Stoke Newington there was during this period a great increase in the Jewish community (my mother & her family moved here during those years) but that wasn’t the case in most of the other such areas.

  23. I had some business in Hackney yesterday which required me to take the 106 bus from Finsbury Park to Stoke Newington.

    I sat in the front seat on the top deck like a little boy, and was astonished to find that almost the entire route along Manor Road, across Green Lanes and down Brownswood Road, is now dominated by orthodox Jews. Literally they were the only people on the road, and going in and out of every other house.

    In my last year at university (1997-98) I shared a flat in Stoke Newington and used to do that same bus journey regularly. In those days those roads were not Jewish roads, the orthodox Jews living further north and east in Stamford Hill and Clapton. In fact it now seems to be a rare case of part of Hackney getting much whiter. Have the orthodox Jews started to move away from Stamford Hill or are they expanding in this part of the world?

  24. Without wanting to make a crude stereotype, with the number of children most orthodox Jewish have its only natural they will have to expand. Almost invariably they seem to have about 7 children with about a year separating each!

  25. The ultra-Orthodox Jewish population is long established in the Manor Road area though it could well be that other demographics are on the decline in their favour now. My parents lived in the road with my grandmother until they moved to Richmond in 1957; in those days, most families were ordinarily orthodox Jews like my grandmother who went to orthodox synagogue but who would not dream of wearing the sheitel (the wig which ultra-Orthodox women wear after shaving their hair off upon marriage), for example. We used to have friends in Lordship Park which is very nearby more than 20 years ago & there were a lot of ultra-Orthodox Jews in the area even then. (One of the friends in question was Yen Chit Chong, who was a Green councillor & parliamentary candidate in the area, though we have lost touch with him now.) It’s been a long while since the ultra-Orthodox were entirely confined to Clapton & Stamford Hill.

  26. When I used to take the same bus journey 15 years ago, the area seemed mixed enough for me not to have noticed the orthodox Jews in particular.

    It might have been partly due to the time I passed through yesterday – early afternoon – with orthodox Jews tending not to go out to work they will I suppose be over-represented on the street in the middle of the day.

    One of the (few) good things about Hackney IMO is the genuinely good ethnic relations. There are large muslim communities such as the Turks and Bengalis who live cheek by jowl with the orthodox Jewish community yet there is very little trouble from either side. Very different to the tensions you were discussing in Bradford, for example.

  27. Census results, white British 2001 / 2011:

    Brownswood: 44.7% / 38.3%
    Cazenove: 41.9% / 36.3%
    Clissold: 51.8% / 46.7%
    Dalston: 40.4% / 35.9%
    Hackney Downs: 37.9% / 32.1%
    Leabridge: 38.3% / 29.7%
    Lordship: 54.3% / 49.6%
    New River: 44.4% / 36.6%
    Springfield: 45.9% / 34.6%
    Stoke Newington Central: 43.9% / 41.3%

    TOTAL: 44.5% / 37.9%

    White overall, Hackney North & Stoke Newington:
    2001: 61.0%
    2011: 57.7%

    There were absolute increases in the white British population in Cazenove, Clissold, Dalston, Hackney Downs, Leabridge and Stoke Newington Central. The largest was in Dalston from 4,182 to 5,289 where the total population increased from 10,358 to 14,727.

    Jewish population, Springfield:
    2001: 2,552 / 10,859 = 23.5%
    2011: 3,604 / 12,378 = 29.1%

  28. In only two London constituencies did the number of white British people increase between 2001 and 2011. One was Battersea, the other was Hackney North:

    Battersea:
    Total population: 87,685 to 106,709
    White British: 57,119 to 58,473
    White British percentage: 65.1% to 54.8%

    Hackney North & Stoke Newington:
    Total population: 106,555 to 128,036
    White British: 47,392 to 48,560
    White British percentage: 44.5% to 37.9%

  29. Census results – Jewish, 2001 / 2011:

    Brownswood: 3.7% / 2.6%
    Cazenove: 13.2% / 21.4%
    Clissold: 1.6% / 1.2%
    Dalston: 1.8% / 0.9%
    Hackney Downs: 2.1% / 1.3%
    Leabridge: 1.5% / 1.9%
    Lordship: 17.2% / 25.9%
    New River: 20.4% / 28.6%
    Springfield: 23.5% / 29.1%
    Stoke Newington Central: 2.3% / 1.4%

    TOTAL:
    2001: 9,611 / 106,555 = 9.0%
    2011: 14,433 / 128,036 = 11.3%

  30. Thanks for those figures Andy.

    Some large increases in the Jewish population here. It’s good to see that the Jewish community are growing.

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