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Doncaster North

2010 Results:
Conservative: 8728 (21.04%)
Labour: 19637 (47.34%)
Liberal Democrat: 6174 (14.88%)
BNP: 2818 (6.79%)
UKIP: 1797 (4.33%)
English Democrat: 2148 (5.18%)
TUSC: 181 (0.44%)
Majority: 10909 (26.3%)

Notional 2005 Results:
Labour: 20882 (55%)
Conservative: 6965 (18.3%)
Liberal Democrat: 5624 (14.8%)
Other: 4502 (11.9%)
Majority: 13917 (36.6%)

Actual 2005 result
Conservative: 4875 (15.4%)
Labour: 17531 (55.5%)
Liberal Democrat: 3800 (12%)
BNP: 1506 (4.8%)
UKIP: 940 (3%)
Other: 2926 (9.3%)
Majority: 12656 (40.1%)

2001 Result
Conservative: 4601 (14.7%)
Labour: 19788 (63.1%)
Liberal Democrat: 3323 (10.6%)
UKIP: 725 (2.3%)
Other: 2926 (9.3%)
Majority: 15187 (48.4%)

1997 Result
Conservative: 5906 (14.8%)
Labour: 27843 (69.8%)
Liberal Democrat: 3369 (8.4%)
Referendum: 1589 (4%)
Other: 1181 (3%)
Majority: 21937 (55%)

Boundary changes:

Profile:

portraitCurrent MP: Ed Miliband(Labour) born 1969, St Pancras, younger brother of David Miliband. Educated at Haverstock Comprehensive and Oxford University. Prior to his election was a speechwriter for Harriet Harman and Treasury advisor. First elected as MP for Doncaster North 2005. Parliamentary secretary to the Cabinet Office from 2006-2007, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster with responsibility for the next manifesto 2007-2008, Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change 2008-2010. Following Labour’s election defeat he defeated his older brother David Miliband to win the Labour leadership in 2010 (more information at They work for you)

2010 election candidates:
portraitSophie Brodie (Conservative)
portraitEd Miliband(Labour) born 1969, St Pancras, younger brother of David Miliband. Educated at Haverstock Comprehensive and Oxford University. Prior to his election was a speechwriter for Harriet Harman and Treasury advisor. First elected as MP for Doncaster North 2005. Parliamentary secretary to the Cabinet Office from 2006-2007, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster with responsibility for the next manifesto 2007-2008, Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change 2008-2010 (more information at They work for you)
portraitEd Sanderson (Liberal Democrat)
portraitLiz Andrews (UKIP)
portraitPamela Chambers (BNP)
portraitWayne Crawshaw (English Democrat)
portraitBill Rawcliffe (TUSC)

2001 Census Demographics

Total 2001 Population: 96423
Male: 48.6%
Female: 51.4%
Under 18: 24.4%
Over 60: 21.1%
Born outside UK: 1.9%
White: 98.9%
Black: 0.2%
Asian: 0.3%
Mixed: 0.4%
Christian: 80.1%
Full time students: 1.9%
Graduates 16-74: 9.7%
No Qualifications 16-74: 40.7%
Owner-Occupied: 67%
Social Housing: 23.4% (Council: 21.6%, Housing Ass.: 1.8%)
Privately Rented: 5.8%
Homes without central heating and/or private bathroom: 6.2%

NB - The constituency guide is now archived and is no longer being updated. The new guide is at http://ukpollingreport.co.uk/2015guide

183 Responses to “Doncaster North”

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  1. “Just as some sports fans go around the country visiting all the grounds in their chosen sport I wonder if Pete has gone around the country visiting every single constituency?”

    Up to a point I do this – I have certainly made sure to visit every constituency in London and most of those in the South East and Eastern regions. Likewise if I have been visiting another part of the country, eg. Manchester I have usually made a point to visit as many constituencies as possible in the vicinity. On some occasions I have made specific trips – for example up until only a few years ago I had never been to Lincolnshire so a me and a friend drove up there and drove around Boston, Grantham, Spalding etc. More often though it would be a case of being in a another part of the country and taking that opportunity to visit other places nearby.
    I’ve visited relatively few constituencies in Yorkshire (probably less than half) and the only time I recall seeing this particular seat was en route to Scarborough one New Years and I had a little look around Bentley. On the same trip I did make specific trips from Scarborough to Hull and to Teeside. On the other hand the motivation was to see particularly grotty areas (such as Grangetown or the Orchard Hill area of Hull) rather than to be able to say I had visited this or that constituency, because as I recall I didn;t go to either of the Stockton seats and if I was solely interested in adding to the total number of constituencies added, I can’t see why I wouldn’t have done that while in Middlesborough.
    I do have a fantasy of taking a trip whereby I spend a day and a night in every constituency in the country, but since such a trip would take almost two years its not likely evere to be fulfilled.

  2. On the location of your afternoon drinking session Richard, I was initially going to guess Sprotbrough but this seemed like too obvious an answer and I had suspected it might be a tirck. Also on Google maps I couldn;t see a pub that was by a cricket ground, but I know that not all pubs come up on there so it does look like the village of Sprotbrough itself may be a good candidate. There’s clearly a cricket ground between Thorpe Lane and Melton Gardens, a medieval church (St Marys, 1176) to the south and a wooded river valley beyond that. I assume the pub is within the pavilion there, assuming I have the correct location this time

  3. The Ivanhoe

  4. HH says the clock can’t be turned back but I haven’t given up hope that it can be. After all, in the early nineteenth century licentiousness was all the rage with the Prince Regent, etc, but 50 years later society turned in a puritanical direction with the Victorians. That particular change probably wasn’t predicted in advance.

  5. The kind of scenes Richard described are repeated every weekend in hundreds of locations up and down the country. Personally I have not much greater interest inc ricket than I do in the X factor, but my brother still plays in a village team in just such a setting and many thousands of other people do. I don’t know how HH thinks he can deduce anything about Richard’s marital status from any of this. Surely not all women are so shallow and vacuous that all they are interested in is TV talent shows and shopping?

  6. ‘And it is the stereotype of Tories continuing to hark back to such old fashioned views of the country that is one of many factors holding back their vote share nationwide.’

    I completely disagree

    This is one of the few things I find endearing about the Tories and I doubt I’m alone in that

    I’ve never been one of these who longs to go back to how things used to be but I simply don’t buy into this theory that Britain is a better place today than it was half a century ago

    It’s clearly not – and if trips to soulless shopping centres, watching the horrendous and shameful X Factor, and starting fights in the inner city, and spending days infront of face book are representative of life in England today, I think we’re worst off for it

  7. Well done Pete.

    The pub is actually the large building in the centre of the picture with the pavilion being the less impressive one to the left.

    I think we might have an interesting game here – describe an experience with a few clues and see if Pete can locate the area.

    I’ve heard it said that for a man the definition of good value entertainment is something which costs less than the amount of beer he would drink in the equivalent time. So a football match should perhaps be less than the price of say 3 pints.

    I was fortunate in that I got the entertainment free with the beer, and being a Sam Smiths pub it was very cheap beer ;-)

  8. I must say I thought John Major’s ‘old maids bycling to holy Communion through the morning mist’ speech was ridiculous when he made it and still do.

    But I’ve always strongly believed in quality of life issues rather than mere living standards and in particular the mindless consumerism which is now held up as a goal.

    And on Saturday I experienced something which was very high on the quality of life scale for me personally. Other people will have different things they regard as personally very pleasant and I hope they get to experience them whatever thay are.

    I do think though that both the current government and the previous one have emphasised far too much mere consumerism. A cult of consumerism has been held up almost as a national philosophy, ‘I shop therefore I am’ so to speak. Its not even as if the consumerism is on British made things, imported tat is the symbol of our obsession.

    So we now have the lunatic situation where we are told the country is undergoing ‘austerity’ (and where a majority think too much ‘austerity’) at the same time as public spending is at an all time high and continuing to increase, consumer spending is at an all time high and continuing to increase and the trade deficit is at an all time high and continuing to increase.

    While at the same time the country consumes 10% more wealth than it creates each and every year and the government bases its economic strategy upon a massive increase in household debt.

    Has this massive orgy of consumerism actually made the country a better or a happier place?

    And what’s going to happen when at some point it all comes to an end when we finally start having to live within our means?

    The riots of last summer were I fear a horrible portent.

  9. Don’t get the point about consumerism to be honest.

    Of course, it is vital that we rebuild savings in this country,
    and I hope the Government can reduce taxes on savers.
    We also want to avoid getting into debt.
    But within those parameters, surely “consumerism” is just business, and manufacturing – all of which we want to see.

    A political party needs to attract some range of views and different types of people and areas.
    But the village green and the cricket, and the stocks is one of the central pillars of Conservatism. Erode the core, you are not left with a party atall.

    It’s not either or anyway.
    In many areas things have to move on very rapidly.
    So keeping the village green well shored up and other traditions is an important anchor when so many other things are undergoing rapid change.

  10. All sounds very idylic

    I have to say when I think of Northern ex-ming seats like this, cricket greens and country pavilions aren’t the first things that spring to mind

    I would have thought dissused collieries, bellowing cooling towers and red brick terrace housing to be more the order of the day

  11. I meant ex-mining

  12. Joe

    There’s nothing wrong with funded consumerism – you earn some money and then you spend it – I’ve done plenty of it myself.

    But what the economy has become increasingly dominated by is unfunded consumerism – you spend what you want and if you haven’t got enough money you just borrow it.

    The “cos I’m worth it” and “don’t put it off, put it on” mentality.

    Since 1997 retail spending has increase by 48% while industrial production has fallen 13%. Before the depression started we convinced ourselves that the City or rising houses prices would pay for it all. Now we don’t even bother to make the pretence we just keep on spending because we can’t stop.

    So you have mad headlines as in today’s Telegraph saying that ‘austerity’ is damaging the economy because government spending is at an all time high.

    We aren’t going to be able to keep the madness up forever – the collapse in annuities for those now retiring is an early indication of what’s going to happen to everyone’s lifestyle.

    Its quite fitting that this discussion should take place on this thread – because one of the tenets of working class self improvement was to avoid debt and not to spend money which you didn’t have.

  13. We need to reduce taxes on savers
    for the longer term health of the economy

    and also give the pensioners some relief
    who have seen annuities hammered
    and payouts decline for a number of reasons.

    but the Government is trying to balance the books.
    Hopefully they are looking at what they can do.

    But ideally we need an improvement in our economic performance so that the funds also perform better.

  14. “But what the economy has become increasingly dominated by is unfunded consumerism – you spend what you want and if you haven’t got enough money you just borrow it”

    Wasn’t that the Labour party mantra between 2000-2008. Spend spend spend. Before that they seemed to be quite reasonable with their spending until the millenium dome came along.

  15. “but the Government is trying to balance the books.”

    I’m afraid it isn’t Joe.

    What the government’s economic strategy was based upon was a huge increase in household borrowing replacing the present huge government borrowing.

    The concept of spending only what you earn is as alien to Cameron and Osborne as it was to Brown and Balls.

    What we will have to do at some point is recognise reality and the huge drop in living standards which will come with it.

    Because the longer we leave it the more painful the adjustment will be.

  16. The government did not set out to pump up private debt instead. I think qe is no good though and living standards prob do need to fall

  17. No-one wants to take responsibility for debt.

    The banks and credit card companies blame consumers for spending money they don’t have, and consumers blame the credit card companies for offering them the cards in the first place.

  18. “The government did not set out to pump up private debt instead”

    Actually it did, in Osborne’s first budget was the assumption that household debt would rise by £500bn by 2015.

    Its possible though that neither Osborne or Cameron actually understand that, they’ve always seemed to have very little understanding of or interest in economics to me.

    I really don’t get what’s so hard with the concept of you only spending what you earn which so many people and almost all politicians find so difficult to comprehend.

    If you want to spend more then work harder so you earn more.

    Instead we have become an instant gratification society with little self control.

    The right to try has been replaced by the right to have.

  19. At the time of the budget the government was going to advise people to try to pay off their debts but at the last moment they were told this was a bad idea because the economy requires people to keep spending even if it means more personal debt.

  20. “I have to say when I think of Northern ex-ming seats like this, cricket greens and country pavilions aren’t the first things that spring to mind”

    Actually mining areas tend to have very good sporting facilities with lots of organised teams.

    “I would have thought dissused collieries, bellowing cooling towers and red brick terrace housing to be more the order of the day”

    You don’t see closed mines as they get redeveloped, often for leisure use – golf course, nature reserves, country parks etc.

    Much of the housing in the more modern mining areas would have been standard semis rather than old terraces.

    In Yorkshire and the midlands (it is I think somewhat different in Wales, Scotland and north-east England) there’s also a substantial number of non-mining villages scattered among the mining areas. These tend to be desirable places to live.

    There’s also a huge number of minor stately homes – the coal under the ground making the landowners much richer than if they’d had to rely on agricultural income alone. This place is only a couple of miles away from where I watched cricket:

    http://aolsearch.aol.co.uk/aol/image?q=cusworth+hall&v_t=sb_uk

  21. And this rather larger places is a few miles the other way, where it gives its name to the adjacent constituency:

    http://aolsearch.aol.co.uk/aol/image?q=wentworth+woodhouse&v_t=sb_uk

    It was up for sale a few years ago, it probably cost not much more than Joe’s house in Twickenham ;-)

  22. Thanks for the clarification Richard – those stately homes do look rather grand

    I’ve been to Doncaster several times – and my train to York goes past it – but don’t know the area at all well

    I guess with the mines having been closed for a couple of decades, redevelopment would have taken place

    And of course such areas where the hotbed of economic activity during the industrial revolution

  23. Don’t think my prediction that Labour will get 57% here in 2015 was that outrageous. Unlike other nearby seats most of the demographic change has probably already occured here.

    Richard was predicting what he wants to happen in this constituency even if his points on other seats were correct.

  24. ‘If you want to spend more then work harder so you earn more.

    Instead we have become an instant gratification society with little self control.

    The right to try has been replaced by the right to have.’

    I’m not right wing and disagree with too much personal debt. Richard would probably class me as an urban leftist but I don’t really conform to his exact stereotypes.

  25. Problem is no mainstream party has a plan to deal with personal debt.

  26. “Unlike other nearby seats most of the demographic change has probably already occured here.”

    The process will continue for decades as the old mining traditions die out and outsiders relocate to developments with cheap housing but good communications.

  27. “Problem is no mainstream party has a plan to deal with personal debt.”

    They do, their plans are for it to increase.

  28. How do you go about re-educating people that to be immersed in personal debt is a bad thing when governments have spent the best part of 20 years encouraging people to live beyond their means, especially the government between 1997-2010.

  29. What’s Ed Miliband like as a constituency MP? Every Labour leader so far has been pretty close to his constituents but Ed doesn’t seem to have any connection whatsoever to his.

  30. Doncaster North 2015 Most likely

    Lab 56.5 (+9.2)
    Con 20.3 (-0.7)
    UKIP 7.1 (+2.8)
    LD 7 (-7.9)
    Others 9.1

    Turnout 56.9 (-0.4)

  31. Intresting to see that Labour are actually 5 points down on 1983 here. Perhaps they will lose this seat in 30 or 40 years in a big tory year as it does seem to slowly be going downhill for them.

  32. “What’s Ed Miliband like as a constituency MP? Every Labour leader so far has been pretty close to his constituents but Ed doesn’t seem to have any connection whatsoever to his.”

    Yes, I remember Tony Blair’s thick Geordie accent well.

    And I’m sure he’s retired back to sunny Sedgefield to enjoy his millions….not.

  33. Well at least Tony Blair was from or partly from County Durham. Albeit not the Sedgefield part of Durham. Thats more than EM can say.

    Going to Fettes he wasnt ever going to have a Co. Durham accent. I went to a public school too and you couldnt tell I am from the north-east either.

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