Yesterday’s Observer had a new YouGov poll of London, commissioned by Queen Mary University London. Full tables for the poll are here.

Labour performed very strongly in London at the general election this year. There was six point swing to Labour compared to a two pooint swing in Britain as a whole, presumably related to London being younger and more pro-European than the rest of England. The first post-election poll of London shows Labour holding on to that dominant position – topline figures with changes since the general election are CON 30%(-3), LAB 55%(nc), LDEM 8%(-1).

Sadiq Khan also continues to enjoy strong support. 58% of Londoners think he is doing well as mayor, and asked a comparative question he rates more positively than either of his predecessors. 58% think Khan is doing a good good, compared to 47% who thought Ken Livingstone did and 46% who think Boris Johnson did.

The poll also asked about TfL declining Uber’s application for a licence renewal. When this was first announced there was a very negative reaction on social media… but of course, that over-represents exactly the sort of people who regularly use Uber. The poll finds that people who regularly use Uber do indeed think it was the wrong decision (by 63% to 27%)… but the majority of Londoners use Uber rarely or never and they approve of the decision. Overall 43% of people think it was right to take away Uber’s licence, 31% think it was wrong. Even among those regular Uber users there’s no obvious sign of a backlash against Khan or Labour. 66% of them still say Khan is doing a good job, 63% say they would vote Labour in an election tomorrow. Personally I’d be extremely surprised if the whole thing didn’t end up with a compromise between TfL and Uber allowing them to renew their licence, but for the moment the polling suggests that the public back Sadiq Khan on the issue.


629 Responses to “YouGov/QMUL poll of London”

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  1. @ TW

    doesn’t the Conservative election system militate against a hard brexiteer?
    The requirement is that the Parliamentary Party reduce the field to two candidates: currently as I understand it there are about 30 to 40 hard brexiteers, about 30 remainers and about 230 pragmatic MP’s to whom achieving a safe exit will be all important (so with eyes on prospects ofr the economy) it seems that they might reduce the field to two soft brexit proponents for the party membership to vote on!

  2. @S THOMAS

    I understand your biases and in many ways I agree if the Tories are to be successful they need to do a lot of things. You are correct in that they hold the purse strings. My point is that the Labour Party held the purse string when they lost the election in 2010. The problem is not the purse string per se it is the holder of such strings.

    What I find interesting is that you are asking for a different leader and a completely different policy. I accpet the GOP is pretty much self centred: Fiscal Hawks when not in power and indeed worse than Corbyn when in power but the Tories are not. What you are asking for is a command style economy such as was successfully applied to South Korea and Taiwan. I do not see that coming from the Tories.

    The interest in battery technology will apply only small amounts of funding when in truth the big player (of which we have none are already putting billions in to projects. Indeed the FP7 proposals and eurostar proposals are already in play. Tesla is building the biggest battery factory in Australia and Apple are working with the Chinese. The germans are doing it themselves hell we will be assembling gemran batteries and other Gemrman parts into the next generation electric mini.

    I am not knocking the need but this would need us to basically abandon austerity lite and do some serious borrowing for investment. I just do not see the Tories doing this I see them doing what they have been doing for the last 7 years that is cut a little here, spend a little there. As American say no big plays just trying to inch their way into the game. It is why we already have very little in terms of winning technology turning into commercial gain but it is clear.

    My fear is that we are becoming the assembly point not the make it point. We need to be both because the design and development teams are not massive we need to own all of it which is why I am fearful. I work in the semiconductor industry we used to have architecture, design, fabrication, test all in the UK and we used to invest in all. Then fabrication became expensive to invest in so we out sourced it, and then we outsourced test, then we outsourced design and soon we will have out sourced everything

    it is why the coolest phone might be US design but the bets phone is designed in South Korea, it uses an ARM processor but most of the smarts is not the ARM processor it just means all the software works it is the smarts of everything else

    This kind of encapsulates the problem as I see it.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/oct/03/problem-not-capitalism-tories-thatcher-treasury-cupboard-bare

  3. Wonderful speech by Boris. Enough soundbytes to fill a library.

    Upbeat stuff-taking it to Corbyn & McDonnell. No one else could have made it.

    And totally supportive of TM-not a hint of difference.

    Good to hear positivity from Fox & Davis too.

  4. Fox was not positive when he said in his R4 interview at 1 pm that leaving the EU in Mar 2019 with no deal would be very bad for the UK.

  5. So YouGov’s raw figures in their poll of Conservative members:

    https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/lowelyec40/ToryMembership_Sept2017_W.pdf

    probably do tell us as much about the make up of the current Tory Party as anything else. They suggest that they are made up as follows:

    Voted Leave 66%. [44%]
    Voted Remain 32% [39%]

    Male 56% [48%]
    Female 44% [52%]

    18-24 6% [11%]
    25-39 12% [25-49 = 43%]
    40-59 23% [50-64 = 25%]
    60+ 59% [65+ = 21%]

    ABC1 84% [57%]
    C2DE 16% [43%]

    London 12% [13%]
    Rest of South 39% [32%]
    Midlands/Wales 19% [21%]
    North 19% [24%]
    Scotland 9% [9%]

    [] = weighted targets from YouGov’s most recent VI poll (f/w 22-24 Sep). For some reason the members poll used different age groupings.

    It’s pretty much what you would expect heavily weighted towards the middle-class (or at least non-manual workers) and the elderly and more towards men (though not overwhelmingly). These things are true of all political Paries to some extent, though there is evidence that Labour has become younger and less male since 2015.

    An article from the PMP, published yesterday:

    http://ukandeu.ac.uk/tory-party-members-divisions-over-brexit/

    is based on another YouGov survey for them done in June and suggests that unlike Labour their membership is getting older, not younger (“only 15per cent of Tory members are aged under 35, down from 23per cent in 2015”). Brexit, the scandals over their various youth wings and general incompetence must have played a part.

    (The article itself has a lot to say about the attitudes of Tory members to Brexit, which along with the latest YouGov poll suggests they are not as unified on the issue as some think).

    What does strike me about these figures is how closely the geographic spread matches that of Britain as a whole. There may be compensating factors at work – for example the lower popularity of the Tories in London is counterbalanced by Party membership in general being much higher there because of those working in and around politics (as we see with other Parties). The result is that the final percentage reflects the population.

    But generally if the Conservative Party is dying out in some places, it is not happening at the regional level. More likely it is already weak areas within regions that are collapsing while other areas hang on. Alternatively they really are disappearing everywhere.

  6. @COLIN

    I agree the speech is exactly what Tories want. They need to feel good in themselves it was not a speech for policy BoJo does not do policy, rarely does diplomacy but I fear the reality is once the conference season is done nothing will change. The problem we had last friday will still be there next friday and I am not sure that the debate has changed

    We are told we must make capitalism work better but we are unsure what that means and I suppose that is where we have our problems

  7. PTRP

    @” Tesla is building the biggest battery factory in Australia ”

    Lithium Ion-existing technology.

    …which is peaking in development.:-

    “Even Tesla CEO Elon Musk, hardly one to underplay the promise of new technology, has been forced to admit that, for now, the electric-car maker is engaged in a gradual slog of enhancements to its existing lithium-ion batteries, not a big leap forward.
    In fact, many researchers believe energy storage will have to take an entirely new chemistry and new physical form, beyond the lithium-ion batteries ”

    Technology Review.

    Try to be a little more positive about UK –

    http://www.alphr.com/technology/1006401/faraday-challenge-battery-institute

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/sep/26/james-dyson-electric-car-2020

  8. PTRP

    @” we are unsure what that means ”

    You may be.

    They’re not-and I’ve heard most of the main speeches.

    I’m certainly not.

  9. @DAVWEL

    I think everyone agrees leaving without a deal would be bad economically for everyone. UK and EU. The reality is that soem people believe that this is an acceptable solution

  10. @Trevor

    A full grant was around fifteen hundred in the early eighties, and yes the forms weren’t that onerous. But it tends to be the case that every obstacle you introduce however minor will likely reduce participation. We can see this with voter registration for eggers.

    Testing for free school meals eligibility might not be that onerous either but people still forego it. The concerns about means testing can be much greater if you go through some assessments though. And as for summat like an ATOS assessment, you might be in for a shock!!

    Of course you are focusing on that aspect while the not insignificant problems of saddling them with a huge debt burden and the needless bureaucracy remain, which the previous approach did not have.

    Loving the way you equated my explanation of the virtues of HE with evening classes and lifelong skills. I am not talking about a situation in which if You lose your zero hours job you can retrain for another. I am talking about the education making you fundamentally more capable so you can do more challenging and financially rewarding things than you would otherwise and be more adaptable and be better at creating your own action and may well not need the evening classes.

    Not that all higher education necessarily achieves this optimally. But it does tend to have you analysing more complex problems than at A level. The better tutors will show you how to think better.

  11. @Trevor

    “I very much doubt youth voters received that message though. CON PR machine is a shambles and the moral hazard implications send totally the wrong message (IMHO).”

    ———

    Given that they were sold initially the idea tuition fees wouldn’t mostly scramble towards the maximum and that the debt interest wouldn’t go up like it did it might be lunacy to place too much hope in that announcement.

  12. @Colin

    Yep, battery tech represents a considerable challenge. But I wouldn’t underestimate Musk. He has ways of working around things. Thus, he’s able to reduce the price of those power walls he’s selling to smooth out renewable fluctuations, by simply repurposing batteries from cars that have lost a bit of their charge down to 85%.

    He is slashing the cost of space travel by making rockets reusable. He already has the first stage routinely returning to earth to land, now he’s doing the second stage. Don’t forget he also innovated in founding PayPal. An incidentally his PhD was related to battery tech, he studied supercapacitors, a likely alternative.

    i posted a while back about recent advances in capacitor tech. They charge fast and don’t tend to deteriorate as much, but charge density is an issue. They’re making strides in density now and if they sort that…

  13. Musk’s Falcon 9 returning to earth. They’ve done it 16 times now

    https://youtu.be/xZMBVLSUxLg

  14. Landing on a platform at sea, with side view, and also some of the early dramatic failures!

    https://youtu.be/lEr9cPpuAx8

  15. @COLIN

    Did you read what the money is for?

    ;-)

    £246M is for a range of technology including smart meters for christ sake. The original Li-ion batteries were invented in oxford
    http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/energy/a25536/inventor-lithium-ion-battery-invented-another-battery/

    You will notice he is not at Oxford any more

    https://www.environmentalleader.com/2016/09/which-next-gen-battery-companies-lead-the-market/

    I am being optimistic, we are not developing as much in the way of new battery technology as you think. We are not even in the top 10 of new battery technology at this time this is an attempt to get in the game which I applaud but I fear that we are come in as also rans

  16. The sound bite that the BBC is running from Boris`s speech will hardly pull in any younger voters.

    “This government works for everybody, but Jeremy Corbyn wants everybody to work for the government”.

    Surely everyone under 47 will know that this is a gross exaggeration, and how public-sector salaries have been pushed down below inflation in every year since 2010.

    As for a programme of nationalisation that affects less than 5% of private-sector workers being “everybody””, this merely confirms how the Tory top ministers spin outrageously and their words simply cannot be trusted,

  17. @ AW – Tory leader selection process. I think you have the number of ‘Remain’ too high – my guess would be <=10 but agree your thoughts in theory.

    The problem for the 'soft' side (10ish Remain plus maybe the bulk of the middle) is lack of candidates. Ruth doesn't want it. Rudd has too small a majority (Crabb same but not even mentioned these days). Hammond is not popular.

    It is possible 'soft' side find some fresh face that gets through to the final but two fresh faces would be highly unlikely IMHO.

    I don't see it happening until early Dec now, possibly later. A lot will depend on events between now Dec. The ferrets have the kissed and made up for now but if the sack gets a shake then the fight will probably sprawl out of the sack next time.

    NB – use of 'soft' and 'hard' are relative terms, I prefer 'messy' and 'clean' but accept everyone uses 'soft' and 'hard'.

    All IMHO of course.

  18. @bill patrick

    give over with your “trillions spent on health tourism”

    according to the goverments own research “health tourism” costs the NHS a maximum of £300million a year – which is around 0.3% of its overall budget. It spends more than that on stationary.

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/how-much-health-tourism-actually-9307953

  19. CARFREW

    @” But I wouldn’t underestimate Musk. ”

    I dont-didn’t…………..just quoted his views on the need to move on from Lithium Ion.

    UK is getting involved-I think thats good.

    Thats it really :-)

  20. @ CARFREW – sorry some misunderstandings. Anything <18yrs should be free IMHO, I'd go back to free milk which I vaguely remember being pulled when I was around 7.

  21. CARFREW

    “Yes, I wasn’t on about the IKEA kind of unit”

    I wouldn’t dream of buying an IKEA anything, I don’t like their designs or their quality.

    Al URQA

    Interesting view, both my wife and I are at one with Swift. Neither of us wants to be any younger than we are.Didn’t need Swift to tell me we are wise though, after all we voted Brexit. :-)

  22. @Trevor

    There’s a strong case that it should all be free, HE too. I’ve given some reasons to do with enhancing capability, here are some more.

    Stuff we want to encourage that benefits us should be supported or incentivised. The problem with the argument that there aren’t enough sufficient jobs to justify is that this is to a considerable extent down to the whim of government.

    An example. In recent times I’ve gotten to know a few who had recently studied environmental science. The reason is that they have been working in coffee shops and bars because the cuts wiped out their career paths. Then people complain we’re training too many people. Well that’s easy to say if you cut their careers. If we slash medical precision, suddenly we might have a glut of the medically trained. But is this really an argument for fewer doing degrees, or for more funding for medicine.

    We find ourselves in the curious position that if we erase the better jobs, graduates obviously have to take the lesser jobs. But crucially they still need to get the degree, because employers can now take advantage of the glut and insist on graduate status for lesser jobs. Then pile a load of tuition debt on them for the privilege of having to get a degree to have that zero hour job and if they complain call them deluded members of a cult for wanting something else, more like it used to be.

  23. medical precision = medical provision

  24. COLIN

    Yes great stuff by Boris.

    I saw a piece about Dyson’s new electric car investment the other day. He’s a true Brexit believer.

  25. @ToH

    Yes I wondered after I posted if mentioning IKEA might cause alarm!

  26. TOH

    Dyson says the engine is pretty much sorted-they are working on battery.

    He is quoted as saying :-“Wherever we make the battery, that’s where we will make the car. ”

    Hope UK Government makes sure it is here.

  27. @Colin

    Soz Col, didn’t mean to sound contrary. Yes, the Faraday Challenge is a good spot, and interesting to see another model for spurring innovation. Been wanting the Gvmt to support battery tech for a while, might have mentioned it before. Graphene is another potential battery tech and we discovered Graphene here.

    Curious about the Dyson approach to electric cars, what new efficiencies does he have in mind? I like his point about fitting filters to his cars to filter out the pollution from others’ diesels. The lateral thinking of a proper innovator.

    He says the Far East are keener on electric cars and more concerned about particulates, so that’s where he’s looking to build them?…

  28. @ToH

    “I saw a piece about Dyson’s new electric car investment the other day. He’s a true Brexit believer.”

    ———–

    He’s also set up that new college. Fascinated to see how that’ll turn out. Ratger hope it works.

  29. hireton

    you of all people should beware false news. Which farmers? Reading article there is no reference to any farmers. Please be more careful.

  30. @ CARFREW – my concern is encouraging young adults to make bad choices. I’d be fully supportive of lower or even free fees for STEMM subjects set at a high standard (2nd M = broad catch all medicine). How many Anthropologists do we need? How many people studying Media and Communications are going on to rewarding well paid jobs? How many people who are taking a course at Glyndwr University really thought through their decision:

    https://www.theguardian.com/education/ng-interactive/2017/may/16/university-league-tables-2018

    Judging by the IFS piece and this Guardian piece the message seems to be ‘don’t worry about taking a dud course, because you won’t have to bother repaying the debt’
    https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/jun/15/uk-student-loan-debt-soars-to-more-than-100bn

    I understand the holistic approach you are suggesting but that is a step much further than where LAB are currently at.

    Maybe in the short-term the supply side needs some tighter regulation?

    However, there are many problems with trying to manipulate supply, especially with a 3-4y lag. It’s possible to fairly accurately estimate the number of teachers, nurses, doctors that society will need but in some other countries even that has had issues (e.g. over-supply of teachers in Canada). Guessing how many Chemical Engineers we might need versus say Information Technology? The more the state intervenes the more you drift to 5y plans and trusting politicians to make all the decisions.

    I’m rambling a bit now. I’ll stick to helping my kids make the best decision for their future and if they want to study Anthropology at Glyndwr then I’ll certainly ensure they use student loans for fees and maintenance and not be funded by the bank of mum and dad!

  31. “He’s a true Brexit believer.”

    Isn’t it interesting how advocates of Brexit keep using the language of religion?

  32. I’m sure we all know Dyson has also set up his own Uni – with no student fees. Very small intake and high qualification requirements but I hope other companies follow his lead.

    https://www.dysoninstitute.com/the-degree/

  33. CARFREW – apologies a quick PS to the above that missed in a moderated comment from earlier

    some Unis take the means testing of maintenance grants in house, eg Bath:

    Bursaries The gold scholarship programme offers bursaries of £5,000 per year of study (not including paid placement) to up to 50 students from low-income families.

    The Bath bursary, for UK students with a household income of £22,000 or below, pays up to £3,000 for each year of study.

    Bursary sounds much nicer than means testing though.

  34. WB: doesn’t the Conservative election system militate against a hard brexiteer?
    The requirement is that the Parliamentary Party reduce the field to two candidates: currently as I understand it there are about 30 to 40 hard brexiteers, about 30 remainers and about 230 pragmatic MP’s to whom achieving a safe exit will be all important (so with eyes on prospects ofr the economy) it seems that they might reduce the field to two soft brexit proponents for the party membership to vote on!

    I think that is precisely why TM is safe at the moment. To force an election there has to be a number of letters to the 1922 committee AIUI and I suspect that beyond the 30 to 40 hard brexiters, no one wants to go neear an election for leader.

  35. @Trevor

    The post you just made is much more like it, gets to the heart of the matter. It’s easily confusing though, one needs to be careful in how one sorts through it.

    Firstly, yes, there is a need to consider what jobs society, business etc. needs. However, part of my point is that there is an element of education that transcends this. Sure, you may want to alter the balance of subjects studied etc., maybe more STEM etc., but that’s different from the overall number of graduates.

    The point is that whatever you have them study, setting aside the needs of the job market, there is a virtue in having them develop their general intellectual capability and also ideally things like their adaptability, entrepreneurial capability etc. Some tutors and courses do this rather better than others of course.

    In principle therefore, there is some merit in having more graduates, before we get to what they should study. And yes, this. Is made very difficult for them. They look at the jobs market, decide to go into environmental science, and then find as they approach graduation their career path has been suddenly wiped out? Kinda hard to plan if that’s going to happen. Even harder if it’s part of a general wipe out if numerous jobs because harder to find an alternative.

    Nonetheless, the more general capability they get from the course the better off they’ll be trying to adapt. It’s interesting seeing that at work. One for example has gone back into education, done teacher training and is now teaching a Stem subject. Another has actually set up his own coffee shop with his brother now, although their dad is quite well off which possibly helps. (They do an excellent filter coffee, a nice change from my usual Macchiato. I didn’t realise filter coffee could be that nice…)

    I wind up in quite a lot of chats about this sort of thing with graduates and soon-to-be-graduates. It’s quite a challenge for them. I know rather more who’ve done media, or media production. The other day one of them, a guitarist, has just got an iPod and was asking me about guitar and recording apps. Yes, there are more media graduates than media jobs, but that doesn’t automatically mean it’s a bad thing.

    Firstly, if their general capability is enhanced, that’s a plus that can help in other jobs. On such degrees you ought to be learning how to write and communicate better, analyse better, present better, etc. etc.

    Secondly, they might participate in the media economy but on a part time basis outside their main job. Thirdly, some will subsequently make it down the line. If you are into making music, the nature of that economy us you may have to strive for years first. It’s not like being a careers officer.

    In the end, it comes back to the same thing. Are there enough decent alternative jobs. So even if there aren’t enough media jobs there is something else. That is the real problem. Then you don’t have to so accurately predict supply in each sector. That’s how we managed in the days of full employment.

  36. Argh. iPod = iPad in this instance

  37. @Trevor

    “How many Anthropologists do we need? ”

    How many do we produce (I know the answer to this, by the way)? It does not take much of a stretch to work out why specialist in human behaviour might be useful in the age of the Internet.

    “How many people studying Media and Communications are going on to rewarding well paid jobs?”

    The large majority. (I know the answer to this too). The growth of online media in particular has made a lot of these degrees in demand. There exists a silly stereotype of them all watching films all day (there is always one degree course everyone looks down on – in my day it was the sociologists). In actual fact, these are the people studying how to operate and develop advanced AV systems at which we are a world leader. Oh, and journalists and librarians come under these courses too.

    “How many people who are taking a course at Glyndwr University really thought through their decision:”

    Glyndwr is embedded in a difficult labour market in North Wales and pay levels reflect that. They are an archetypical case of why league tables are rubbish. It is not helpful to suggest that students in North Wales who go to their local institution to train to get jobs in North Wales are foolish or misguided.

    Do think before you post.

    They shouldn’t be offering degrees in complementary medicine, mind. It’s quackery.

    Data on all of this stuff exists, by the way. Loads of it.

    ” Guessing how many Chemical Engineers we might need versus say Information Technology?”

    It’s ‘demand estimation’. We do it overtly in the UK for the health professions because the numbers are centrally planned, and the University of Warwick do it for broader professional groups through the Working Futures series. The Warwick group are really, really good.

  38. @Carfrew

    ” Yes, there are more media graduates than media jobs, but that doesn’t automatically mean it’s a bad thing.”

    Our massive, and rapidly expanding, marketing sector will take all of them and more. The Internet and online media has made these degrees much more valuable than they were even 5 years ago.

    Of course a lot really want to work in what their conception of ‘the media’ is and take an awful lot of convincing to do something as base as marketing.

  39. s thomas: hireton – you of all people should beware false news. Which farmers? Reading article there is no reference to any farmers. Please be more careful.

    If you RTFA, you will find it is The British Agriculture Bureau in Brussels, whom I would think should qualify as farmers.

    Far from Hireton purveying false news, the article is about Gove being caught out with another fake EU news item about the tagging of pigs*, pretty much out of the same school as the bent bananas idiocy. [Fake story from Gove, we cannot export Pigs Ears to China – a delicacy, because the EU require ear tags which puncture the ear which is unacceptable to the Chinese market. The truth is that the EU require pigs to be identifiable which can be achieved by a tag or a tatoo, the latter being preferred by farmers]

    If you are really agin fake news, you should not be covering up for Gove. And it shows how desperate Gove must be to trot out drivel like this when he is the responsible minister. You’d think if there were any substance to the damage the EU is doing to British agriculture, he would have a more substantive and genuine tale of woe]

  40. @Trevor

    I should add there are other benefits of higher Ed. useful regardless of what career you go into. For a start, you can usefully extend your network. (This is rather valuable to zero hours peeps who can keep each other up to speed on where hours might be going). Secondly you can be exposed to career ideas and approaches you might not otherwise have come across, something that happened to me. Did I go into a career in my subject discipline? Nope, in significant part because of stuff I learned about other options while I was at Uni.

    But, there used to be more options…

  41. @Chris Riley

    “Our massive, and rapidly expanding, marketing sector will take all of them and more. The Internet and online media has made these degrees much more valuable than they were even 5 years ago.

    Of course a lot really want to work in what their conception of ‘the media’ is and take an awful lot of convincing to do something as base as marketing.”

    ———-

    You may well be right Chris, I’m not up to speed on current stats on the matter. I do meet quite a few music tech. Grads not working in that sector, but that’s possibly a bit of a special case.

  42. @monochrome october

    Yes I’m afraid our histrionic poster has neither the intellectual rigour or the application to digest any information. Best to ignore her.

  43. Degrees and Employment:

    I don’t know the stats, but you do have to be careful about assuming anything. A lot of people might think we need more STEM degrees, but I suspect that the truth is a lot of well trained graduates of this type also end up doing jobs with little to do with their degree. Hopefully well paid jobs, but not directly related to the degree, eg programming and general IT for banking and other financial sectors. The problem may not be lack of STEM educated people, but rather lack of industry and science investment in the UK to employ them. Sorry, I haven’t figures to support this, but it’s an argument I’ve heard in many places.

  44. CHRIS RILEY

    (there is always one degree course everyone looks down on – in my day it was the sociologists)

    You might care to play or download Lehrer’s mathematical performance from 1997 which includes his Sociology song [appx 7m 45s into the 13m video]. See https://archive.org/details/lehrer

  45. Colin

    Just catching up with today’s speeches I agree Bojo was on good form ,however I was more impressed by Hunt’s speech nobody could doubt his sincerity in wishing to do the very best possible for the NHS he wasn’t trying to score political points just setting out what he was trying to achieve and how the NHS could and has raise its standards.
    Considering what a thankless task running the NHS is for any politician having stuck at it for 5yrs and still be enthusiastic about improving and reforming it certainly takes some doing.

  46. @TRIGGUY

    “i don’t know the stats, but you do have to be careful about assuming anything. A lot of people might think we need more STEM degrees, but I suspect that the truth is a lot of well trained graduates of this type also end up doing jobs with little to do with their degree”

    ———–

    Oh yeah, we’ve had a few maths grsds working at one of the pubs near me. They replaced the environmental scientists. They set some nice geeky pub quiz questions about space and Dr Who etc…

  47. Well the king of Spain knows how to calm things down. Nothing quite so good for putting out fires as petrol.

  48. MO

    you have a funny definition of a farmer. I think that if you look in the dictionary it does not say farmer= civil servant who works in Brussels. Now if they grew brussels that is different.

    you and hireton have another definition:balanced=someone who is against brexit; biased= someone who supports brexit.

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