Yesterday’s Observer had a new YouGov poll of London, commissioned by Queen Mary University London. Full tables for the poll are here.

Labour performed very strongly in London at the general election this year. There was six point swing to Labour compared to a two pooint swing in Britain as a whole, presumably related to London being younger and more pro-European than the rest of England. The first post-election poll of London shows Labour holding on to that dominant position – topline figures with changes since the general election are CON 30%(-3), LAB 55%(nc), LDEM 8%(-1).

Sadiq Khan also continues to enjoy strong support. 58% of Londoners think he is doing well as mayor, and asked a comparative question he rates more positively than either of his predecessors. 58% think Khan is doing a good good, compared to 47% who thought Ken Livingstone did and 46% who think Boris Johnson did.

The poll also asked about TfL declining Uber’s application for a licence renewal. When this was first announced there was a very negative reaction on social media… but of course, that over-represents exactly the sort of people who regularly use Uber. The poll finds that people who regularly use Uber do indeed think it was the wrong decision (by 63% to 27%)… but the majority of Londoners use Uber rarely or never and they approve of the decision. Overall 43% of people think it was right to take away Uber’s licence, 31% think it was wrong. Even among those regular Uber users there’s no obvious sign of a backlash against Khan or Labour. 66% of them still say Khan is doing a good job, 63% say they would vote Labour in an election tomorrow. Personally I’d be extremely surprised if the whole thing didn’t end up with a compromise between TfL and Uber allowing them to renew their licence, but for the moment the polling suggests that the public back Sadiq Khan on the issue.


629 Responses to “YouGov/QMUL poll of London”

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  1. @ALLAN CHRISTIE

    “Crikey you’re trying to over engineer polling. Didn’t AW tell us that raw headline VI can cover a multitude of sins…be it falling letter coughing or fake P45’s ;-)”

    ————-

    You gotta move worth the times though AC. When letters start falling poling has to adapt.

  2. Factually (not IMO), Blair’s personal role in the removal of Clause IV, the framing and introduction of the minimum wage (which he set out for debate during the European election in 1994),and changes to the voting rights of trades unioms leadership elections, substantively changed the objectives of the Party and the basis of its membership. These were actions written into its constitution which changed the nature of its membership and leadership, significantly changed the role of the unions and the rights ane commitments of their membership, and so (IM0) changed the nature of democratic politics and the perception of the party in the eyes of the electorate.

  3. should be “the voting rights of trade unions in Labour Party leadership elections”…

  4. Vince Cable will be thanking Nick Clegg ( not).

    Clegg says join Labour or Tories to try to stop Brexit from within those parties.

    http://news.sky.com/story/ex-lib-dem-leader-nick-clegg-join-labour-or-tories-to-stop-brexit-11068127

  5. Any chance of a VI poll, or two preferably.

  6. Seems the OBR are about to won up to over estimating UK economic performance for 7 years an will downgrade its already falling growth forecasts – scotching Hammond’s plans.

    Never rains but it hails.

  7. TM

    I shall wait until it really gets grim for TM…say when 150 Members of Parliament from her own party declare her to be unfit to be considered for PM to say her fate is sealed. What did happen to the guy declared unfit?. Oh Yes I remember now… OOOOOh…..

  8. @NEILJ

    I would like to agree with you but you need to firstly have enough Tory MP that are willing to put the knife in and I don’t think there is enough MPs to do that and the Polls need to turn decisively against May and I am not sure she will not be withing striking distance.

    I believe the MP are all scare fartless of losing their seats and indeed of selling any policies

    In 2015 they sold the labour party as the party of scroungers then essentially told some of their core voters they were scrounger by cutting their tax credits. from that debacle they have put themselves in to a position of selling Labour lite policies. Which will feel too little too late.

    over 1 million people are on social housing waiting lists and extra 5000 houses a year does not cut it. A nw Leader will definitely mean a new election in my view as I feel the idea of running scared would again be bad optics.

    The real problem is that they have no one that all sides would rally around. BoJo, JRM et al would not unite the MPs and indeed would mean a policy change from labour lite. No one else commands the enough respect and no one wants to won Brexit.

    May is going to be there for at least 2019 and I would think that we will not be ‘out ‘ of the EU until 2021 at the earliest and we will still be negotiating the transition deal

    No one would want to be doing that If you are taking over you would want a clean break with brexit. So unless Tory MP get themselves together or the tories start polling a conssistent 5% below Labour I reckon they will wait and hope.

    This is not your usual tory position and yes I could be wrong but nothing I have seen says that Tories actually know what they want.

  9. @JP

    “Factually (not IMO), Blair’s personal role in the removal of Clause IV, the framing and introduction of the minimum wage (which he set out for debate during the European election in 1994),and changes to the voting rights of trades unioms leadership elections, substantively changed the objectives of the Party and the basis of its membership. These were actions written into its constitution which changed the nature of its membership and leadership, significantly changed the role of the unions and the rights ane commitments of their membership, and so (IM0) changed the nature of democratic politics and the perception of the party in the eyes of the electorate.”

    ________

    Whether in the context of the discussion it was necessary after Black Wednesday to get elected, as opposed to liberal opportunism, and whether it influenced the Tories to do likewise is something else of course.

  10. @NICKP

    In fairness this was due at some point I think they will do a series of underestimating which may allow more room in future.

  11. @Carfrew – “Regarding Alec’s point my main point is that the reasoning is flawed, you can’t just claim it.”

    Don’t like these bad tenpered and rather pointless exchanges.

    For clarity, you have missed the point, which I will take the blame for as I probably didn’t explain more exactly what I meant.

    In 1997, Blair did not talk about neol!beralism being a problem and needing to be swept away. Today, we are.

    It’s fairly simple to grasp, in that Blair was offering a continuation of the same economic model. Today, large numbers of the public feel that the economy is sufficiently broken that a new model is needed. That is a direct result of the crash in 2008 and the response to it.

    Now you and @Paul Croft just kiss and make up, while I go and make sure @TOH has his slippers handy.

    It’s Thursday – let’s be happy.

  12. @Carfrew – “Regarding Alec’s point my main point is that the reasoning is flawed, you can’t just claim it.”

    Don’t like these bad tenpered and rather pointless exchanges.

    For clarity, you have missed the point, which I will take the blame for as I probably didn’t explain more exactly what I meant.

    In 1997, Blair did not talk about neol!beralism being a problem and needing to be swept away. Today, we are.

    It’s fairly simple to grasp, in that Blair was offering a continuation of the same economic model. Today, large numbers of the public feel that the economy is sufficiently broken that a new model is needed. That is a direct result of the crash in 2008 and the response to it.

    Now you and @Paul Croft just kiss and make up, while I go and make sure @TOH has his slippers handy.

    It’s Thursday – let’s be happy!

  13. @CARFREW

    I have some sympathy with your view that many people voted Tory to preserve their gains in asset price.

    Although 42.4% would that there would be some people that could be peeled off that figure after all most polls ahve the tories at about 40% now.

    My view is that many people have voted for brexit and believe the Tories are the only one that can deliver it or are best placed to deliver it. Hence I believe the Corbyn view is get brexit out of the way and let do policies. I believe his view is that he cannot win with an anti brexit policy so all he can do is fight the aftermath which I believe in many ways is true (I say that as a harden remainer)

  14. One way of judging the public perception of politics is to examine the policies put into effect over time. One academic study looks at the policies of Mrs Thatcher’s and concludes that Thatcherism was embedded in all the government policies of Blair, Brown, and the Cameron coalition.

    http://eprint.ncl.ac.uk/file_store/production/231865/1E50257F-504E-4E9D-8723-FA049DC7D6BA.pdf

  15. Clegg has a history of entryism, with him Laws and a few other Tories taking over the LDs :-) and pretending to be LOC right up until a day after the 2010 GE.

  16. @Nickp – yes, that news about the OBR might answer one or two questions about why they got so much wrong for so long.

    They have consistently bailed out Conservative Chancellors with surprisingly upbeat projections at key set piece political events, but it now seems like this was due to the overestimation of productivity.

  17. carfrew

    “@Paul
    Plus, I have ALSO provided evidence if the big polling lead following Black Wednesday, and what happened under Brown.
    You got nowt except trolling the board.”

    As you are becoming increasingly rude, abusive and rather childish I won’t be responding to any more of your posts.

    But as for your “evidence of a big polling lead” I also have evidence of an even bigger one before the last general election, That went well….

    I think you are clutching at straws.

    Your comments re Alec are simply childish [especially given the number of times you have quoted Marks’ research so approvingly].

    Since this whole episode, which you have prolonged ridiculously, began with me making a mild comment, agreeing with a post that Alec had made [which you immediately declared “wrong” as soon as I said it was right] it would have been odd had I not referred back to that post occasionally in vain efforts to get back to his initial point.

    You, of course, are certain to continue this: I will not.

    NFO.

  18. @PTRP

    Well Imwas just using Asset prices as an example of something that might trump other things. I mentioned Brexit as another example as well as competence… in the past we might consider Falklands, the way deterrence featured in 1987, for some possibly even potential coalition with SNP in 2015.

    And may well be others of course, depending.

  19. @Paul

    “But as for your “evidence of a big polling lead” I also have evidence of an even bigger one before the last general election, That went well….”

    ———

    Jesus. Yes, of course polling can be wrong, the point is that in 1997 the polling lead was borne out by events in the election. Hence it showed that fears about the polling being wrong again and the need to tack so far towards the liberal were probably wide of the mark.

  20. @Paul

    “You, of course, are certain to continue this: I will not.”

    ——-

    Nah I’ll just reply to the point about polling not the whinge if that’s ok!

  21. @JimJam

    “Clegg has a history of entryism, with him Laws and a few other Tories taking over the LDs :-) and pretending to be LOC right up until a day after the 2010 GE”

    ——–

    Yes it was rather like Cuckoo-plus. Not just take over a party, but take over a party and pretend to be a different party again.

  22. CARFREW
    I would argue that the introduction of the minimum wage, alongside the social wage and working rights elements of the EU Social Chapter, laid the economic and social foundation of EU and global work migration to the UK during the decade following Blair/Brown, and the UK’s economic growth within the EU.
    Brexit is in a number of respects the unravelling of that structure of rights and deployment of an international labour market as the basis of economic development and EU and Labour Party derived working rights. It’s no wonder that the Brexit and party political divide are falling out the way they are. On that basis also the acceptance or resistance to inheritance of Thatcherism described in the article can now be seen as the basis of the party and electoral divide.

  23. @JP

    I agree with you about the introduction of the minimum wage and that Tories have kept it and arguably even extended it.

    Not so sure about the union stuff though!

  24. The other howard,
    “Really this site is a shadow of what it used to be. A leftwing anti-brexit talking shop basically ”

    You dont think this reflects the something like 25% swing to labour in recent months?

    Baldbloke,
    “Right now, and despite all his problems, Johnson would actually be a better choice.”

    I dont think so. Johnson is very valuable to the conservatives as a loose cannon spouting off about hard Brexit. he shows hard brexiteers that the conservatives are thinking about them. As PM he could not do this, because if he did, then there would really have to be a party split with those who disagree. The conservatives need to foster the image of being an all inclusive party, and they need to show a balance of hard, soft and even remain views. To alienate soft brexiteers now would be pretty disastrous. labour would soar in the polls.

  25. Colin
    “Quantity doesn’t equate with quality often here these days.”

    Agreed,

    Peter Cairns SNP
    “Gone are the days when the Tories had more posters than Labour and long gone the days when people took you even half seriously.
    I am sure you lament that.”

    Not at all Peter. When you and your ilk write nonsense like that I know that I’m hitting the target with my posts. I post here when I feel like it and I enjoy doing so, to me it’s just a bit of fun. It seems you feel the need to spend time writing abusive post to me, as you have just done. It confirms your obsessional behaviour IMO. If you were sensible you would calm down, and ignore my posts in future. I have given you this good advice several times. I just hope you follow it.

    R Huckle.

    Thanks for your post

    “And quite a few are anti Brexit.”

    I agree, one of my reasons for joining the Conservatives. In a small way I may be able to help bolster those members who voted to leave or have accepted the vote of the people and now back leaving at least locally. I live in an area which voted narrowly to remain.

    “So UKPR is not unique from what i have seen. As i have said before, i would not be confident that Brexit was going to happen, unless the negotiations with the EU make a lot more progress and most MP’s can support it.”

    I don’t think you are right but it’s a possibility. If it did not go ahead for the reasons you give I think it would be a big betrayal of the voters and would have disastrous long term consequences for the UK, socially and economically, just IMO of course.

    I agree about May, a big disappointment to me and others I suspect, in a number of ways, not least on Brexit. She has already moved too far as I admitted to Alec.

    “Surprising to me. Labour are getting support from the ABC1 group and not C2,D,E. So it is not a question of unintelligent people falling for Labours unaffordable policy ideas.”

    I would suggest it could be just that.

    TONY IBERT

    If the “cap fits” as they say. I suggest you take your own advice and ignore my poists if they upset you.

    Paul Croft

    “Because Corbyn’s brilliance only came to light in that very brief time span. It simply can’t be regarded as something that everybody should have been aware of from the beginning. And it still left Labour losing critical traditional seats and 60 seats behind Mrs May!!

    Fair comment Paul, as you say labour still lost. Even now they currently only have a small lead. There is still all to play for at the next election IMO.

    Back to early baroque music, I also bought two CD’s featuring Emma Kirkby accompanied by Jacob Lindberg performing works by Dowland, Purcell and others. Sublime singing and playing. My wife is a convert already. Do you like Kirkby, I think her voice ideal for this sort of music; such clarity and precision.

  26. Howard

    You mentioned Kapsberger recently, which is a great choice; since you enjoyed that then another suggestion would be any of the eleven Cds recorded so far by Robert Barto [American lutenist] of the music of Sylvius Leopold Weiss on Naxos.

    Or get your wife to buy you the whole lot for xmas.

    Weiss, as you may know, was a contemporary of Bach and the latter supposedly made a long journey to meet him and hear him play.

    I was fortunate enough, some years ago, to hear Barto play an entire Weiss programme in an amazing Baroque church in Hersbruck [near Nuremberg] and both he and the audience were quite remarkable.

  27. Danny

    The other howard,
    “Really this site is a shadow of what it used to be. A leftwing anti-brexit talking shop basically ”
    You dont think this reflects the something like 25% swing to labour in recent months?”

    I think AW said in the past that he has found that there is always a preponderance of opposition supporters. I don’t have a problem with that, or find it surprising. The trouble is that so many leavers have left the site, no doubt bored rigid by the endless anti brexit diatribes. I miss Neill A’s import for example, he often had very interesting things to say.

  28. We have already been through the idea that there was no way to tell that a Corbyn might campaign better. There was no way of knowing for sure but there was ample reason to entertain the possibility…

    1) polling on typical policies like nationalisation

    2) He had won the leadership,campaign, twice, against the odds

    3) Geovernments are well placed to nick policies and implement so Corbyn had to keep his best ideas quiet, depressing polling

    4) the big rise in membership, and the rallies

    5) membership motivated by Brexit

    6) once a Corbyn had an electoral platform and people could see what he was really like, harder for media to attack,him

    7) Theresa was unproven in a proper electoral campaign as leader

    8) How much was his polling depressed because of policies etc. and how much because of the party infighting. If in an election the party unites he might well gain quite a bit

    9) they were using social media a lot more.

    10) Demographic trends favouring Labour

    11) As time goes by Austerity might hamper Tories more and more

    12) Labour now had a lot more funds than before owing to membership

  29. Paul Croft

    Thanks Paul. I must say I am enjoying exploring an area of music that I have neglected up until now.

  30. Paul Croft

    Wonderful stuff-thanks.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vK7lNkkVMp8

  31. @ToH

    “I think AW said in the past that he has found that there is always a preponderance of opposition supporters.”

    ———

    Well the business of govt being tricky esp. following a big crash it tends to favour the opposition. In good times for the government though it might differ.

    Following the 2015 election Tories had their tails up and we lost quite a lot of Labour supporters…

  32. passtherockplease,
    ” if it was not fine you would have had a set of policy about the JAMs”
    I think from the result of the polling and research done because of the election, we can conclude there are big problems for tories with the JAMs (in terms of their ceasing to vote tory). And that these problems existed at the time May was elected PM, and to her credit she was aware of them. From her record, she has always been aware of this issue. Whether the MPs who chose her were aware of this as a critical issue I dont know, and whether they are now remains to be seen. On the basis of the conference, there was more lip service to helping people buy homes/university fees, but precious little action. This does not suggest the party considers it critical.

    OR, it considers that to admit to a problem by changing policy would have worse consequences with other groups of voters. A U turn on austerity would have massive implications re admitting incompetent management for 7 years. It is a fundamental tenet of conservative belief that a small state sector is good and a desireable aim in all circumstances. This would have to be ditched.

    “I am not sure how much was brexit let say 5%. her problem is that after brexit why are you voting Tory?”

    Its much more than 5%.It is an issue which has had people turning out who never voted before. All those traditional labour areas returning leave. But otherwise I agree entirely. The tories can expect 10%+ of their vote share to disappear even if everything goes perfectly with Brexit. Some labour would also disappear, of course. Thats still a guesstimate. It could be a lot more. Many people here seem determined to downplay Brexit but it has been a completely galvanising issue.

    What really happens is likely to depend on final outcome and the path we take to it. Not that tories are covering themselves in glory in that respect so far. Worse case will be if things go badly, and then either remain or leave, as the case may be, will be very upset with how Brexit has been conducted (or not). Or possibly both sides will be upset with the tories because no one gets what they wanted.

    “Danny I think you are missing the fact in every poll Labour voters are talking about housing education and cost of living as primary issues, Tories are talking brexit and Immigration as main issues”

    I think you are missing the point that what we are debating is whether tory voters will defect elsewhere, so it is the views of the tories which matter. They voted conservative because they feel strongly about Brexit. The ones who care more about housing already moved to labour.

    I saw Dianne Abbott on ‘this week’ must be years ago, saying Corbyn would surprise everyone. Before he became leader. I think Corbyn has spent 30 years planning how to win on a left ticket, and he sees circumstances right for it now. So yes, I agree that consrvative policies are currently misaligned with the times, but as I said, they have a core vote wedded to other policies and a binary choice which group to offend.

  33. Enjoying a MTB trip up in the Borders – fantastic sunny day in Kielder Forest today and over into Scotland tonight and next few days. One of the most beautiful areas in UK IMHO but brief replies from y’day.

    @ SOMERJOHN – what is the NET trade in finished cars and for a bonus point split that between EU and non-EU.
    Obviously not everyone is going to win and it will be messy for some manufactures as I stated in my post.

    @ BZ – CON are not far-right. May’s policies are probably centre-right on a UK scale based on last 40years or so. I wish she would drop the immigration target – in which case they’d probably be roughly centre – close to your French president’s intentions! However, if you look at the crossbreaks on polls less than 10% of electorate want a LAB-leave outcome. The biggest two groups are LAB-Remain and CON-Leave (both around 2.5x higher)

  34. Howard

    Yes, I am a big fan of Emma Kirkby.

    Colin

    Pleased you enjoyed the music. It’s written in tablature and very complex to both read and play, the lute being tuned largely to a D minor chord and additionally multiple bass strings [ergo I can’t do it.] which combines to give the music a unique texture.

    Barto played a Weiss encore the evening I heard him play and told me afterwards that, because there is no music/key signature he turned one page too many and, because of the lack of clues, found himself playing a different dance movement from a completely different suite.

  35. TM
    i am not a fan of TM but some might have noticed that i do post in the brexit interest.My own family was split. My own motivation is primarily sovereignty and legal but also not so much what the EU is now but what it will inevitably become.Whether we leave now or later we will leave because the fundamental ethos of the EU is contrary to what i believe is the ethos of the UK..
    I understand the economic arguments but do not see tthem in the terms sometimes described on this site
    However, i support TM on the basis that without her brexit will fail. The enemies of brexit know this and that is why they attack her so much and with so much venom. I do not regard her as being of great ability but if she resigns chaos will reign and Brexit will. be lost and this country will face a bitter political war into the forseeable future.
    On balance i would prefer to lose a few % points of growth than exist in a country divided against itself.

  36. Blimey, England are not very inspiring, dunno why I watch.

    Rashford is an exceptional talent though.

  37. the other howard,
    “The trouble is that so many leavers have left the site”

    I take what you said, that opposition people are often motivated to post. Presumably they feel strongly about the issue and are therefore motivated to do something, even if it is only to engage in internet debate. So what does it tell us if tory leavers no longer feel motivated to enter the debate? Presumably if they thought they were losing, they would be energised to take part. So either they think they have won, and have therefore packed up and gone away, or they no longer feel as motivated about the issue as before.

    Polling reports a 25% swing to labour in recent months, from the staunchly leave party to the one which is at least equivocal about Brexit.

    As PTRP recently pointed out, tory voters are the ones obsessed with leave, who believe in it fervently. And that party is the one which failed to get the expected majority. The number of people motivated by brexit was less than expected. Either it had been measured wrongly, or they change their minds.

    So consistent with the finding that there are fewer people posting on the leave side.

  38. Can’t see reference of this poll elsewhere here…old news? (website’s publish date is 4th of this month)

    Anyway, SNP seem to have clawed back some VI from Con / Lab. MoE probably, and from mid-September sampling.

    http://survation.com/increase-snp-vote-share-scotland/

  39. Bit tetchy on here tonight.

  40. Trevor Warne
    An MTB trip?
    Motor Torpedo Boat?

    S Thomas
    Almost agree with you, except I don’t think Mrs May offers the best way forward to a reasonable Brexit. Corbyn poss?

  41. Trevor Warne: what is the NET trade in finished cars and for a bonus point split that between EU and non-EU.

    You brexiters do like to delegate your homework, don’t you?

    OK, in 2016 we imported 2,323,755 cars and exported 1,354,216, giving net imports of 969,539.

    Our car imports from rEU were 1,603,390 and exports to it were 758,361, giving net imports of 845,029.

    The key point for me is that if a hard brexit and WTO tariffs render the UK car and components industry uncompetitive, leading to closure or shrinkage of Nissan, Toyota, Honda and Mini plants, then by 2027 our car stats will be more like (assuming 500k residual production): total market 2.5m, of which imports 2.25m. Total car exports: 250,000.

  42. S thomas,
    ” My own motivation is primarily sovereignty and legal but also not so much what the EU is now but what it will inevitably become”

    Personally I am quite happy for the EU to stay exactly as it is. Hardly perfect, but good enough. But I think it is likely to continue to integrate, because every step along the way has always been agreed because it is in everyones best interest. Collectively that might mean one day turning round and discovering a new nation has been born, but that would not invalidate the argument why each and every step was a good thing and so was the final result.

    We live in a globalised world, and the only way to make that work is by globalised government. So I come to my conclusion that whatever happens about Brexit now, we will be a member at some point in the future (or of some comparable organisation). How quickly will depend on the world economic circumstances. Or wildcards such as war, pestilence, energy crises, falling letters and so forth.

    As to May, I agree with you, she is the tories (or anyones) best hope of a successful Brexit. But I dont rate that chance high. Nor, it seems, do many tories or they would not be making such a fuss. I guess it is particularly the hard brexiteers who see this slipping from their grasp.

    I think labour, if the choice comes to them, would go for he softest of Brexits, because they have stated their priority is the economy. Logically, being a member is preferable to a very soft Brexit where we follow the rules but have no control, So remain is becoming more likely all the time. Particulalry because many tory MPs also think this is the preferred outcome.

  43. @Danny

    I agree that it’s inevitable the world moves towards global, or at least continental, governance.

    I’d have thought that for those who recoil from the idea of further EU integration, the logical response would have been to support development of a two-speed Europe, leaving the eurozone to integrate further and the UK, the ex-Comecon countries and possibly Sweden and Denmark to remain semi-detached politically but within the Single Market.

    I suspect that will happen anyway, and a decade or so down the line the (much diminished) UK will rejoin the outer circle. It will have been a painful and salutary decade.

  44. PAUL CROFT

    I’m afraid I don’t understand any of the technicalities. But its a lovely sound -and a beautiful instrument.

    Thanks.

  45. Harry scores and both England & Scotland win – 1st and 2nd in group!

    Scotland still have to beat Slovenia though, I think.

  46. COLIN

    It’s got lots of strings !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  47. Brexit

    I would pre-referendum have settled for a compromise. if cameron could have negotiated us out of the commitment to ever closer union and opted us out of the extension of the scope of the ECJ through the mastricht and lisbon treaties i would have been content.

    However , the humiliation of cameron was a national humiliation and convinced me that reform from inside was not possible. Secondly the sight of a boatload of millionaires and self styled London elite waving champagne bottles and insulting hard working fishermen who came to london in their boats pushed me from a cavalier position to being a roundhead.I consider that those images rather than the bus did for the remain campaign.

    I fear the country is descending into chaos. There is only one way out tM must contact the 27 heads of government and tell them that if trade talks do not start by jan 1st the Uk will not seek one and will leave the EU on the 29th of march without one.
    A50 allows a nation to leave the EU. We are acting within the EU legal framework. No where does it say that a nation so acting that the nation so leaving must deal with all the problems that arise and no wherte does A50 say that progress must be made before trade talks can be held. Indeed quite the reverse. These are entirely political constructs and have had the effect of souring the relations between two great trading entities. How can such be viewed as a success or be lauded as something praiseworthy by some posters. it is a failure for the ordinary citizens of the UK and the EU.
    Can anyone seriously say that things would not have been better if general all encompassing talks had not started and can anyone seriously say there is a good reason for their not to be continuous talks.When Barnier says the clock is ticking someone ought to suggest that they work full time on this then. why will the eU not go to arbitration on the heads of loss. Answer because that is not a victory for the EU and Barnier
    Many will hate the above but at least everybody knows where they stand.Uncertainty ends. Maybe new bridges have to be built even to our eU friends but at least we can start building them rather than standing forlornly on the shore trying to see if the grass is greener on the other bank.

  48. Well we have a ‘poll’ with tables and all

    http://interactive.news.sky.com/SMSLXI_MAYSPEECH_051017_FP.pdf

    And “Do you think Theresa May’s party conference speech was a) very good, b) fairly good, c) fairly bad, d) very bad, e) don’t know”

    Very good 12%
    Fairly good 27%

    Total good 39%
    Bad 40%

    The public have spoken. Of course its the oldies propping up the figures as ever

    55+
    Good 59%
    Bad 32%

    The youngsters, 18-34
    Good 21%
    Bad 50%

    Looks like Brexit is hardening views as ever. No matter how badly the PM does, as long as the old folk get their Brexit they will love her.

  49. Oh, and we have crossover, the remainers have taken the lead.

    https://twitter.com/EuropeElects/status/914185173088030720

    Sorry if I am a bit late with this one…

  50. test

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