YouGov’s regular voting intention poll for the Times has topline figures of CON 43%, LAB 25%, LDEM 11%, UKIP 10%. The Conservative lead remains strong and third place continues to bounce back and forth between the Lib Dems and UKIP (I expect they are actually about even and we’re just seeing normal random sample variation).

On best Prime Minister May leads Jeremy Corbyn by 53% to 13%. This is May’s highest figure since her honeymoon, Jeremy Corbyn’s lowest ever and the 38 point gap is the biggest we’ve recorded so far. This is the first poll since the attack on Parliament and Prime Ministers sometimes do see a boost to their reputation if they are seen to have handled an emergency with confidence so it could be connected, or the timing could be pure co-incidence.

The reason for the huge gap is Corbyn’s low support among Labour voters. Typically people answer these questions along partisan lines – Tory voters pick the Tory leader, Labour voters pick the Labour leader, the best PM lead ends up being similar to the voting intention lead. At the moment 94% of current Tory voters think that May would make the better Prime Minister, but only 46% of current Labour voters say Corbyn would (15% say May, 39% say “Not sure”). Among people who voted Labour at the last election Corbyn’s position is even worse, only 27% say he would make the better Prime Minister, 29% say Theresa May. Full tabs are here.

Given today is Article 50 day, I’ve also written a much longer piece over on the YouGov website bringing together lots of the recent YouGov research on Brexit – you can find that here.


743 Responses to “YouGov/Times – CON 43, LAB 25, LD 11, UKIP 10”

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  1. @ALEC

    “I can’t believe we have people trying to turn this into another ‘Germany Invades Europe’ story.”

    I can, given that the average IQ of a Brexiteer is around the same level as a baboon.

  2. pete B,
    “The point is that Merkel, Germany’s leader, is laying down red lines about the negotiations without apparently consulting other members of the EU, ”

    The point is, that every EU member will be doing exactly this, and we have to satisfy all of them, even when they are diametrically opposed.

  3. Tancred

    “Does May consult with the Scottish, Welsh and NI governments all the time?”

    Yes, she just has.

    Alec
    The negotiations have not yet begun. The negotiations are supposed to be with the EU. Why is Merkel sticking her oar in? You may think she has a right to, and we may disagree, but there is no need to be offensive. I expect it from Tancred, but not you.

  4. @Tancreed

    Do you ever stop being a prat? You have single handedly made this forum a much nastier unpleasant place, whilst at the same time accusing leave voters of being divisive. It’s rather laughable.

  5. Mrs May said failure to reach a trade deal within the two-year time limit could “weaken” cooperation in the fight against crime and terrorism.

    So now we know…. we have a leader who is willing to use our own security as a bargaining chip.

    Surely a first for a Conservative leader.

  6. @Pete,

    You are right. Merkel effectively will sign off quite a few of these positions and agreements as they are the powerhouse, the big net contributor, the one country who if they left that would be it. Therefore I don’t think she worries about speaking ahead of the game so to speak. Personally I don’t mind her, but she seems to move about quite a bit between conciliatory and then harder nosed. Am not sure she is always that easy to read. German goods are popular here, they are well made aren’t they…, so I suspect that will sway her towards a deal rather than WTO terms.

  7. Rich

    That’s far too much praise for Tancred!

    This site had already become a distasteful nasty and unpleasant place before s/he intervened.

  8. Thank you Rich.

    Tancred
    “….the average IQ of a Brexiteer is around the same level as a baboon.”

    I assume this is at least partly aimed at me. As it happens I have been a member of Mensa.

  9. @oldnat,

    I don’t think you can make a more sweeping insult of all leave voters. It’s like saying Scottish voters are thick etc. Where is tancreeds evidence that leave voters have a lower IQ?, I need to see this insight. I travelled through super affluent Cotswold last summer, and everywhere in all the shops and beautiful houses you had leave flags. I find it hard to believe this and the Home Counties are low IQ hot spots, but that would ruin his/her narrative wouldn’t it.

    If remainers/liberal elites etc hadn’t destroyed political argument in this country through mass labelling of people, this resentment would never have built up. I honestly think they are to blame for the leave vote, people were sick off being called names, thick, racist, bigoted etc. The seeds of this vote were later by Blair, Mrs Duffy all that sort of stuff, then magnified by liberals on social media.

  10. Rich
    I have nothing against Merkel personally, it’s just that it gives the game away a bit when she (or any other German leader) makes pronouncements about EU policy.

  11. From the Times… More insight into media habits…

    “The average age of a BBC viewer has topped 60 thanks to the migration of younger audiences to online streaming, according to a report.

    The study by the BBC Trust found that the average age of a person who watches BBC One was 61, while it was 62 for BBC Two.

    The BBC’s iPlayer platform is losing ground to Netflix, the US-owned streaming giant which is spending hundreds of millions of pounds on A-list talent and expensive productions such as The Crown, seen as as direct rivals to BBC programmes. iPlayer is used by 13 per cent of adults, level with Netflix, but comes second among 16 to 34-year-olds at 21 per cent.

    More than five million households subscribe to Netflix, while 1.6 million use Amazon Prime, a newer rival boasting the former cast of the BBC’s popular Top Gear programme. The rise of streaming is “working against” efforts to reach younger audiences, the BBC Trust said.

    The generation gap was especially pronounced in TV news, watched by 86 per cent of over-55s but only 33 per cent of 16 to 24-year-olds.

    “It has always been true that younger people have watched less television and listened to less radio than older adults and so their time spent with the BBC has been lower. But the difference in time spent between age groups has grown over the course of the past few years,” the report says.”

  12. Rich

    I wasn’t making any comment on those who voted Leave.

    I was suggesting that the xenophobic tone on tonight’s thread was distasteful.

    Actually, I’m surprised. I had expected everyone on the Leave side, to be happy and positive tonight – like TOH out for a pleasant dinner and celebrating.

    Hopefully, most are – and we are just left with the bitter, fearful and resentful ones.

    Takes all types, I suppose.

  13. @Pete B – “The negotiations have not yet begun. The negotiations are supposed to be with the EU. Why is Merkel sticking her oar in? You may think she has a right to, and we may disagree, but there is no need to be offensive. I expect it from Tancred, but not you.”

    I’m not going down @Tancred’s route, and no, I don’t feel I have been offensive, and will apologise if people feel I have been. I’m just genuinely surprised that people like you have apparently only just heard Merkel and all the other EU leaders say this. They have an agreed position and have been saying this for months.

    My honest answer to your post is simply that I cannot understand why Merkel’s statement surprises you. She isn’t ‘sticking her oar in’ – she is restating her, and the EU’s position, as she has done many times before, as have every single member and part of the the EU. This is their agreed policy.

    Did you not know this?

    Are you suggesting that EU leaders are barred from stating agreed EU policy? Wouldn’t that be a bit weird?

  14. I’ve been drawn into this interminable Brexit debate yet again, despite my resolve not to. Apologies. G’night all.

  15. @ALAN

    “They” are replacing it with summat, ITER, which should have about 10x the capability of Culham”

    “They” being the international research project led by the various incarnations of the EU. At some point new facilities were always going to be needed to move to the next stage and ITER is an intermediate stage before the development of a commercial demonstration reactor.
    It’ll be up to us if we choose to contribute post-Brexit rather than as part of the EU,”

    ————-

    Lol, yes we know. They’re scaling up to accommodate a larger plasma to make the reaction self-sustaining. If you want to tell me the problems you think ITER faces I can then explain how the Polywell can potentially solve quite a few of them.

  16. Just to remind people – this was from July 1st last year – http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/685153/European-Union-trade-talks-UK-EU-Brexit-despite-Angela-Merkel-relying-UK-jobs

    Now at the time, leavers were dismissing this kind of thing as pre negotiation bluster and positioning, but what do you know – just a week after the Brexit vote the EU had worked out their primary negotiating strategy, and have stuck to it religiously ever since.

    Merkel is simply repeating what the EC decided almost as soon as the result came in.

  17. @Alan

    Btw, your point does nothing to address my point, which was that we should find something else to use the expertise acquired at JET. You just seem to be responding as if I know nothing about ITER.

    It’s another one if your pointless quibbles I’m afraid…

  18. @oldnat,

    Well I voted leave, but I am not overly joyous. I still agree broadly with the position, and wouldn’t change my vote, but I think there is an argument to say it shouldn’t have been given as a referendum, or if so, the bar for confirmation should have been higher to avoid a nasty split in the populous, but I don’t think you will agree on that last point as it’s directly applicable to Indy ref 2 too!

    If the quality of debate in the country was higher, and there hadn’t been all this labelling, I am confident we wouldn’t have left. The only slight agreement I will give to tancreed is there is a large amount of people in the country who the more variables you put in an argument, the harder it is for them to understand, so they break it down simply, this applies to leave and remain voters. Leave maybe their declining community is the EUs fault, even if not true, or for remain I want to leave the EU because I don’t agree with political and monetary union, ok you’re racist. What’s?!! Complexity and understanding to 75% turnout is impossible.

    Trump is the same. Of course the appointment is ridiculous, it’s like something from South Park, but Clinton had double the money and every celebrity endorsement under the sun, so if you still can’t win, sorry, tough luck, Mr Trump deserves his chance, like him or not, but of close it’s now all fine for liberals to attack him personally every week on Saturday night live and take the mickey about his tan and hair, yet put a ladies legs on the Mail and all the liberal are deeply offended again.

    Political debate is wrecked in this country.

    On a lighter note you really should tune in at 4pm LBC for Mr Samonds phone in. I don’t always agree with him but he is an excellent orator and great at thinking on his feet to answer all manner of calls.

  19. Alec
    if the view of Merkel was so un newsworthy and it is so brainless to comment on it…. why is it you, yes you, were the one that posted the link to it and started the whole thread of !!

    No doubt you thought that you would follow your usual habit of posting uninteresting brainless posts (your words).

    You have gone beyond counting the downed spitfires you are now helping build the Fokkers.

  20. @PETE B

    ” As it happens I have been a member of Mensa.”

    If you are then you are not using your intellect wisely. Stick to Sudoku.

  21. @RICH

    “Do you ever stop being a prat? You have single handedly made this forum a much nastier unpleasant place, whilst at the same time accusing leave voters of being divisive. It’s rather laughable.”

    Pot calling kettle black. So you think that we on the ‘losing side’ should just accept everything you people say? And I wasn’t the one who started the nastiness – it has been here a long time. The xenophobia and bile from the leave side has always made sure of that.
    If you want a civilised debate then comments from Pete B such as ‘ein volk, ein reich, ein fuhrer’ are NOT acceptable. This might be fine in a UKIP forum but not in one that is supposed to be geared towards (relatively) impartial debates about polling.

  22. @RICH

    “Political debate is wrecked in this country.”

    Unfortunately this is because there are two sides who cannot be reconciled. You cannot have a halfway house between leave and remain because no such thing is possible – you have one or the other. In many ways this is like the Reformation – you’re either a Catholic or a Protestant and that’s it.

  23. @ Tancred

    To be fair to Rich you are a bit of a prat.

  24. But we have lost the art of political debate and disagreement. Look how places like City University in London, or some of their students banned the Mail, Sun and Express. Yes that’s a university campus!!! A place of frickin learning and discussion!!! If it was up to me I would strip this den of idiocy of its funding.

  25. @BLUE BOB

    And what are you? Just another loser. Indeed, this is what the Brexiteers are – losers. They take refuge in a kind of pathetic mock-patriotism when in reality the genuine patriots are the ones who don’t shout it from the rooftops all the time.

  26. Carfrew’s BBC viewer figures further up the page were interesting

  27. @ Tancred

    I may be a loser, but you are definitely a prat.

  28. @RICHO

    “But we have lost the art of political debate and disagreement. Look how places like City University in London, or some of their students banned the Mail, Sun and Express. Yes that’s a university campus!!! A place of frickin learning and discussion!!! If it was up to me I would strip this den of idiocy of its funding.”

    I agree with them. These filthy rags should be banned – nationwide. How can you debate with hysterical extremists? You can’t – you have to fight them. I would have banned UKIP long ago.
    These people have manipulated democracy with lie after lie to suit their ends. They don’t deserve to be part of the political process and should not have been given the oxygen of publicity.

    Looking at the leavers they are usually poorly educated and of very common background. I couldn’t give a monkey’s fart whether Pete B is a member of Mensa or not – he is a blockhead like most Brexiteers.

  29. @BLUE BOB

    “@ Tancred
    I may be a loser, but you are definitely a prat.”

    Thank you for admitting it and also admitting that I am right with your puny insult. Excellent debating skills.

  30. @ Tancred

    “Excellent debating skills”

    Why, thank you!

  31. @CARFREW

    The viewing figures are interesting. When I was a ‘young person’, back in the 1980s and 1990s the generation split was less obvious. Anyway, back then youths watched little of anything other than Top of the Pops and ‘alternative’ comedy on BBC2 or C4.
    As I’m 50 I’m neither young nor very old, and I do watch mainstream TV and also subscribe not to Netflix but Amazon Prime and Now TV. I watch programmes from all of these.

  32. The implied threat to undermine anti-terror efforts was nauseating enough. But that was nothing compared to the vile jingoism breaking out all over this forum this evening. Those responsible owe us an apology, and would do us all a favour if they would keep their vile thoughts to themselves. Their sickening comments are barely fit for the Daily Mail, and have no place here whatsoever.

    I wouldn’t be at all surprised (or sorry) to see a spell on the pre-moderation naughty-step.

  33. Now now people calm down.

    Apart from anything else if you paid attention you would see that Tancred is not a Prat…He’s a Big Girls Blouse (BGB) so there….

    On the subject of the poll did anyone notice ( the poll for a start!) that the most popular responses on all the aspects of Brexit were that it would do more harm than good.

    I think we are in the Canter stage now.

    It’s like the Light Brigade… Before the Referendum we were standing in the sun but most thought we’re weren’t going to charge. some were gung-ho others hopefully nothing would happen.

    Then the bugle sounded and we began to adavnce slowly walk forward at first and while some cheered others hesitated or tried to challenge the order.

    Now we’re picking up the pace and it’s finally dawned on us all that we’re going to charge the guns at the end of the valley of death.

    Some as shouting Hoorah and standing in their stirrups while others are muttering Bugger and drawing their swords.

    Some are ready to die for King and Country while others just want to get out of this alive.

    The bravest will be those who didn’t want to charge but charged none the less, the worst those who cheered when the order was given but break when the horses start to fall.

    Good luck everyone and may your God go with you!

    Peter.

  34. This blog is very good at explaining Brexit:

    http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/the-aftermath-of-the-brexit-vote-a-verdict-from-those-of-those-experts-were-not-supposed-to-listen-to/

    Basically, the poorer the area, the more likely it was to vote Brexit. Simply because it’s easier to take it out on foreigners – perennially the easy target. People from wealthy backgrounds like Cameron know nothing about how the average working class Brit thinks. The Alf Garnett character is sadly a lot more real than it is fiction. Communism has never really gained much support in Britain because it lacked the nationalism that was needed to get the essential working class support.
    The influx of mainly working class immigrants from eastern Europe in the last 13 years provided the perfect ingredient for the build up of anti-EU hysteria. The misery caused by the economic recession of 2008 onwards and the austerity measures introduced by the government were not blamed on the government but on the EU and the immigrants who were accused of everything from stealing jobs to overfilling schools and hospitals. Easy targets.
    In short, the British underclass takes refuge in xenophobia as a psychological cloak of patriotism to protect themselves from an outside world they don’t understand. In my opinion this is because of the terrible educational levels in certain sectors of the white working class. Lack of education breeds extremism.

  35. @ROBIN

    “The implied threat to undermine anti-terror efforts was nauseating enough. But that was nothing compared to the vile jingoism breaking out all over this forum this evening. Those responsible owe us an apology, and would do us all a favour if they would keep their vile thoughts to themselves. Their sickening comments are barely fit for the Daily Mail, and have no place here whatsoever.”

    I totally agree, and what’s worse is that when I hit back at the loony tunes they accuse me of being nasty. What world are these people living in? Do they expect no challenges?

  36. The psychopathology of the British working class person lies in his fixation on cultural insularity. It’s not so much racism as a fear of ‘foreignness’. The stereotypical image of the working class British tourist on holiday in Europe, demanding fish and chips etc or even bringing packed lunches from home rather than sampling the far more delicious cuisine of the place he visits exemplifies this.

    Middle class – especially upper middle class people – don’t have this cultural introspection at all. Quite the opposite. And although there undoubtedly were quite wealthy people who voted Brexit, the ones who did so took this decision because of issues other than immigration. The middle class Brexiteers, a clear minority, opposed the EU for other reasons such as concerns about loss of sovereignty etc. Nevertheless the key motivator for Brexit was immigration and its social and economic impact.

    Interesting, given that the large non-white immigration from the Commonwealth throughout the 1950s, 60s and 70s did not spark as heated a debate on the existence of the Commonwealth as one might have expected. Partly this was because the racist label was very effective at shutting down any political opponent of such immigration, e.g.Mosley and Powell, and later the NF. The other was the lack of apparent concern in the national press and reluctance of any press baron to attract accusations of racism. However the other issue was that the non-white immigrants from the West Indies did not carry that cultural threat to the British working class that would come from ‘proper’ non-English speaking foreigners. The Asians, who had a culture and language of their own, had much more difficulty in settling into the white community, especially when the Asian arrivals were Pakistanis or Bangladeshis. Indians generally tended to aspire to middle class status and they have been able to integrate much more effectively as a result. Those middle class EU immigrants who have entered well paid jobs in IT , medicine etc have also found little if any hostility among the prosperous British professional classes.

    Therefore, my assessment is that Brexit is little more than class warfare. A sad reflection of class divisions in England and Wales in particular, and the tendency for the white native working class to seek a cocoon of nationalism as a shield to the outside world that they don’t understand and don’t want to understand.
    I come back to education and the wasted decades in which these people could have been taught the benefits of European unity and solidarity. Fortunately I was in one of few state schools in which the head was a very enthusiastic European, and he made sure that foreign language learning was encouraged. Pupils were taught about the importance of the EEC as it was known then.
    Now all we see is dramatic falls in people opting for European languages at school – you could see Brexit coming for years.

  37. @Pete B

    “I’ve been drawn into this interminable Brexit debate yet again…”

    ———–

    Well you’re not going to keep getting drawn into simpler debates where the answer comes quickly and the matter is settled to peeps’ satisfaction already, are you?

  38. I’ve been commenting on this site for some years now, and I’m struggling to think of any comments that may compare to ” Tancred’s ” snobbery and dis-regard for the views of others, or as he would say, ” the ordinary people “….

  39. @Tancred

    “The viewing figures are interesting. When I was a ‘young person’, back in the 1980s and 1990s the generation split was less obvious. Anyway, back then youths watched little of anything other than Top of the Pops and ‘alternative’ comedy on BBC2 or C4.

    As I’m 50 I’m neither young nor very old, and I do watch mainstream TV and also subscribe not to Netflix but Amazon Prime and Now TV. I watch programmes from all of these.”

    ————-

    Yes, taken in conjunction with the other stuff I posted, about how the older peeps are becoming a lot more polarised than the young, it explains a few things, the increasing gulf between the older and younger. The younger are looking around more broadly than the older peeps. I remember dropping Thorium into a convo with some younger peeps wondering as to what the outcome would be and it was like “Oh yeah, Thorium, I blogged about it the other day, here’s my blog” etc…

  40. @IDEAL4RADIO

    Well, I don’t think many would disagree with you. Given Tancred’s posting history It’s not exactly surprising that he is in a particularly venomous mood with the triggering of A50, compounded with the only UK party opposed to that sitting on a mere 10%. That feeling of powerlessness can bring out the worst in people.

  41. It’s too late to find the statistics but Leave voters were drawn from the both the ‘left behind’ communities and the leafy constituencies of the home counties… 60% of the grassroots traditional Tories, the ones that Feldman called the Turnip Taliban, voted leave.

    I suppose you could call that class warfare.. just not as we know it.

  42. @SYZYGY

    Yes precisely. Saying the Leave vote was some kind of class warfare is inane indeed.

  43. SNP strategy holed under the waterline?

    Prof John Curtice of NatCen Research has found 62 per cent of Scots think trade and immigration rules should be the same as in the rest of the UK.

    Detailed Report on all things Brexit and Scottish related here:

    http://natcen.ac.uk/media/1361413/40kt-55a-brx1t-r%C2%A3p0rt_v5.pdf

  44. Carfrew

    I suppose a lot of that European expertise will head for the South of France. I suspect a lot of the British talent would like to. I doubt Mrs. May will put her hand in our pocket to build a competing facility.

    I’m sure we could have great discussions about nuclear physics however it’s not exactly the place.

    I responded to you comment because I found it interesting as an ex-nuclear physicist and was simply trying to expand on the topic, just in case anyone else out there also found the topic interesting. Yet again you jump down my throat for “quibbling”.

    Perhaps it’s the confrontational nature of these boards which is colouring your impression of my posts?

  45. Disappointing to read last night’s comments.

    Just because graduates were more likely to vote Remain than non-graduates doesn’t mean that clever people voted Remain and stupid people voted Remain. Perhaps Graduates tended to benefit more and suffer less from EU membership than non-graduates. That would seem perfectly rational for both sides.

    As for Labour on 25 (its supposed floor) – if 15% of them think TM would make a better PM then could this number fall further if JC is still leader at the time of the next election?

  46. @Alan

    Nope, I’ve explained what it is, it’s quibbling as if I’ve made an error when I haven’t. It wastes time rather than adding much value. You say you don’t wanna discuss physics yet curiously you will when it’s quibbling. (Putting “They” in quotes repeatedly has a rather patronising aspect to it as well that may not endear you to some, just thought I’d give you a heads up).

    As for them going to France, well yes, that’s my point. Would that we could keep some of them, was my point.

  47. @Alan

    P.s. these boards are not very confrontational at all!! Compared to most places. I just like not having time wasted, trying to make it about ‘confrontation’ just wastes more time…

  48. Sea Change.
    “Saying the Leave vote was some kind of class warfare is inane indeed.”

    This thread is about the latest yougov poll. So if we look at the figures there, relating to class groups,
    ABC1: right to leave: 38%, wrong to leave 49%
    C2DE: right to leave 50%, wrong to leave 35%
    A reversal between the upper and lower class divide.

    The question on what results leaving will have:
    ABC1: better off 24%, worse off 43%
    C2DE: better off 31%, worse off 30%

    ABC1: more influence 17%, less influence 40%
    C2DE: more influence 21%, less influence 29%

    ABC1: Good for NHS 23%, Bad for NHS 33%
    C2DE: Good for NHS 32%, Bad for NHS 22%

    ABC1: good for jobs 22%, bad for jobs 38%
    C2DE: Good for jobs 26%, bad for jobs 27%

    Interestingly, both groups think by about 50% that leaving will reduce immigration, virtually no one thinks it will increase it, but there is a slight lead 36/29 from ABC1 to C2DE that it will make no difference. Wonder what happens if this 50% see the reality becoming ‘no difference’, or substitution of EU with other nationalities? This is the question with the biggest certainty aside from the leave/remain choice itself. So maybe the two correlate.

    What are the most important issues facing the nation:
    Leaving the EU: ABC1 68%, C2DE 58%
    Immigration and assylum: ABC1 35%, C2DE 45%
    So potentially there is a group here who have voted to leave solely because they believe it will reduce immigration, but otherwise do not care about in or out.

    The classes are pretty equal on how well or badly they think the government is doing, and Badly has it 37 to 32.

    I suspect that the acceptance we appear to be seeing from remainers is also about the class divide, with ABC1’s generally more willing to accept consensus, and frankly less likely to resort to fists if they find they are losing an argument. But the view overall is moving towards the results of Brexit being bad on all issues rather than good, and inevitably this must be acting to break down acceptance.

    As to May and the conservatives, I assume they had concluded that acting tough on Brexit was the best way to convince leave supporters (which means the C2DEs) that they were serious. However it is getting closer to the time they must take some action, and real choices must be made about specific issues. The ABC1 conservatives being more patient will be waiting to see if their concerns are met by the results of negotiations. And everyone will be upset if things start to go wrong.

    Carrying the tough stance through into negotiations risks alienating core conservative ABC1s, while negative consequences of such a stance risk disillusioning C2DE leavers who have lent their support to conservatives.

    It may be the relative lack of improvement being shown by liberals can be explained by typical remainers being the more patient ABC1s, who will give their traditional party benefit of the doubt until the last possible moment.

  49. @” I come back to education and the wasted decades in which these people could have been taught the benefits of European unity and solidarity”

    Funniest thing on UKPR ever-by a long way.

  50. Jasper 6.40 yesterday evening

    ‘Some of the comments on here border on the unpatriotic. It is apparent that some are hoping for the worst presumably to say I Told You So.
    It is unseemly.’

    True patriotism involves speaking the truth, not ‘my country right or wrong’.

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