ComRes have a poll in Sunday’s Independent and the Sunday Mirror. Most interestingly, it found that people agreed by 45% to 39% that John Bercow was right to refuse to invite Donald Trump to address the Commons, but also that people thought by 47% to 37% that the Queen should meet Donald Trump if he visits the country. As we’ve already seen elsewhere, the British public have little sympathy for Donald Trump’s immigration policy (33% think he was right, 52% think he was wrong) though it’s worth noting that the question wording went considerably wider than Trump’s actual policy (ComRes asked about halting immigration from “Muslim-majority” countries in general, whereas Donald Trump’s policy deals with seven specific countries they claim have an issue with terrorism or vetting).

The poll also had voting intention figures of CON 41%, LAB 26%, LDEM 11%, UKIP 11%, GRN 4%. This is the first ComRes voting intenton poll since way back in June 2016 – after one of the poorer performing polls in the EU referendum (the final ComRes poll had Remain eight points ahead), they paused their voting intention polls while they conducted a review into their methods. They have now recommenced voting intention polls with – as far as I can tell – no changes to their pre-referendum methods. ComRes’s view appears to be that the referendum was an exceptional event, and while the turnout model they adopted after the polling errors of 2015 worked badly there, it worked well at the London mayoral election, so is being retained for Westminster polls. For better or for worse, the ComRes results seem to be very much in line with those from other companies, with a Conservative lead in the mid-teens.

Full tabs for the ComRes poll are here.

While I’m here, I should also mention a BMG Scottish poll that came out at the start of the week (I’ve been laid low with a heavy cold). Voting intention in a second independence referendum stood at YES 49%(+3.5%), NO 49%(-3.5%). This is the lowest lead for NO that any Scottish Indy poll has recorded since the EU referendum. This was interpreted by the Herald as a response to Theresa May’s announcement of her negotiating stance on Brexit. I think that is somewhat premature – so far we’ve had two Scottish polls conducted since May’s speech, a Panelbase poll showing a very small (and not statistically significant) movement towards NO and a BMG poll showing a somewhat larger (but still barely significant) movement towards YES. In short, there is nothing yet that couldn’t be normal sample variation – wait for the next few polls on attitudes towards Scottish independence before concluding whether there is or is not any movement. Full tabs are here


325 Responses to “ComRes/Indy/Sunday Mirror – CON 41, LAB 26, LD 11, UKIP 11”

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  1. In line with the other polls except for Opinium who look like they are the outlier.

    Obviously dreadful for Labour. All eyes on Stoke. It is quite amazing that Copeland has been all but written off, a seat that Labour has held since 1935!

  2. Labour have achieved perfect equidistance:
    15% behind the Conservatives, and 15% in front of UKIP/LibDems.

    Is this the first poll to show – if not quite crossover – crossing of LibDem & UKIP VI?

  3. A proper Comres poll at last! . Have not had time to delve into the details yet but have noticed the Scotland crossbreak which looks very odd. On the basis of past vote, it seems to be saying that in 2015 Scotland voted 19% Con. and 12% Lab. Those figures ignore Non Voters , but the actual figures were Con 14% Lab 24%. One can only hope that the rest of the sample is more meaningful than that crossbreak.
    The poll really does seem so sloppy. The key question begins ‘Thinking back to the General Election of May last year ,,,’. Somebody needs to tell Comres that we did not have a General Election last year at all!

  4. @Sea Change

    “…It is quite amazing that Copeland has been all but written off, a seat that Labour has held since 1935!”

    Yes, but I’m not quite sure why. There has been very little polling in Copeland to explain the media view that it is in the Tory bag.

    Also I keep hearing how Labour the seat is, but on AW’s list of Tory targets it is at no. 31, with a Labour majority over the Tories of just a couple of thousand (which on a lower by-election turnout could notionally equate to just a few hundred).

  5. @Sea Change

    Who is saying that Copeland has been written off?

  6. @RAF

    Here’s an argument, this is still a big ask for the Tories to win:
    https://www.ncpolitics.uk/2017/01/copeland-election-four-ways-think-will-win.html/

    What sentiment that has been expressed through canvas returns are that things are not looking good for Labour in Copeland. Betting on the Tories to win was suspended some time ago. JC’s unequivocal anti-nuclear stance is clearly not helping.

    I think you are down-playing just how hard it is for Governing parties to do better in by-elections and that if the Tories were to win, it would be a historic result. Only managed twice in 60 years.

  7. @Sea Change

    I assure you that you can still bet on a Tory win in Copeland. They are quite strong favourites at 9/4on -ie 4/9!

  8. @Graham

    Yes you’re right. The bookies I was looking at had them suspended, last odds of 4/7.

    Still 4/9 are strong odds on a Tory win.

  9. “I’ve been laid low with a heavy cold”

    Has there been any polling on why men collapse with “man-flu”, while the same viruses don’t seem to stop women doing their jobs?

    I suspect that there may be significant gender differences in such a poll.

  10. @Sea Change

    “I think you are down-playing just how hard it is for Governing parties to do better in by-elections and that if the Tories were to win, it would be a historic result. Only managed twice in 60 years”

    I’m not denying that it would be very unusual by historical standards for the Governing party to win an Opposition seat in a by-election. However, these are highly unusual domestic political times. Taking Brexit into account, together with other unusual factors that favour the Tories in this seat (the importance of the nuclear industry to the area, and that the Tories only have to win a few hundred seats off Labour); the seat is winnable for the Tories.

  11. @OLDNAT

    It’s a simple sexist stereotype, at odds with reality: where men take fewer sick days than women.

  12. @OLDNAT

    Study by Octopus HR showed women take 43% more sick days than men. So there’s that.

  13. @WOOD

    Agreed. In all the companies I have been involved with women on average take more sick leave. However I generally find women employees to be more loyal, more reliable and more diligent on average than men. The very top high fliers do tend to be men however.

  14. @RAF

    Well I do agree with you that we are in very unusual times. In fact a Tory Copeland win was in my NY predictions. It would still be a major upset for it to happen.

    Losing Stoke to UKIP on the other hand would be an utter calamity.

  15. I suspect that time off sick will have MANY more factors at play than just gender and so any study which only takes gender into account will be biased.

    For example: It’s not unreasonable to suspect that jobs that bring you into contact with children will lead to a higher rate of picking up every bug that is going around.

    Women make up the vast majority of people working in early years childcare and so we would expect child care workers to have higher rates of sickness than a data analyst who is locked in a dark room and fed requests for data analysis 8 hours a day.

    The question which should be asked is “Is a woman of the same age and health as a male colleague, doing the same job more or less likely to take a day off sick?”

    If an analysis doesn’t take into account all of the relevant factors and only then look at the marginal effect of gender on sickness days, I wouldn’t trust it and it’s only suitable for generating misleading headlines.

    I suspect the results would be statistically insignificant once accounting for other factors. If there is significance, I suspect it might be societal (either feeling that one can ask for a day off sick when one is ill, rather than soldiering on OR taking more days off because of being hung over or “pulling a sickie”) rather than biological.

  16. Are Labour really going to melt down in the North over Brexit?

    One big lesson from this site is that most voters do not take too much notice of politics. Things that to people who contribute here should make a massive difference just pass people by.

    Secondly, we must remember how little difference issues of the EU and immigration have had to change voting intentions. So there are lots of Northern voters who will vote against the Labour line given a referendum, and utterly reject Labour on immigration. But even “the Bigoted Woman” was reconciled to Labour.

    For those of us who think about politics a lot, Northern Labour voters ought to be shifting to UKIP in by-elections to send a message to keep the party onside. The reality is that most voters do not think so strategically, and an awful lot of them some from the “would vote for a horse with a red rosette” tradition.

    It might be that for Labour to actually reject Brexit – and thus embrace free movement forever and ever amen – would put things to a tipping point. But Labour’s total lack of coherent policy is something of a blessing when facing normally loyal voters who (like most voters) really are not paying close attention.

    To the world that takes notice, much of Labour’s apparent keenness on EEA terms makes a nonsense of claims to have moved on immigration – but that is too technical to help UKIP much. As Mr Wells always says: real voters really aren’t paying enough attention when deciding to vote for one party or another.

  17. @ JOSEPH1832

    I think there’s a good chance they will. As a Lib Dem Parliamentary candidate in a nearby constituency, I’m amazed by the ferocity of our activists down there in what by all pollsters looks like a completely lost cause. There’s people coming in from all over the place on a daily basis.

    Combine that with Labour’s “Look we voted for article 50 and Brexit this week” leaflets I think the majority of remainers could come over to the Libs – we’re banging on about the EU in every leaflet and encounter. Labour’s anti-EU stance has seriously put off a lot of the Stoke Labour party members..

    That would leave a 3 way grab for the Brexiteer vote, on a low turnout anything could happen, but it wouldn’t surprise me in the least if Labour lose the seat to UKIP.

    Moreover, you can see the look in their eyes, its a party divided, with no clear message and a leader struggling to connect with the working class north (and I like Jeremy deeply and respect his principles on a lot of things). They’re worried.

    Was going to put a bet on for Labour to lose both but at 5/4 I probably won’t bother. However the 100/1 for Libs to win both didn’t grab me either :-D

  18. Good morning all from a cold but dry morning here in rural Hampshire.

    This latest poll is a disaster for Labour and a car crash for them, the Lib/Dems.

    The changes from their last poll which was way back in June…
    CON: 41% (+7)
    LAB: 26% (-3)
    LDEM: 11% (+3)
    UKIP: 11% (-8)
    GRN: 4% (-)
    (via ComRes)
    Chgs. vs Jun 2016

    So again I have to ask the question…Where is this much talked about Lib/Dem surge? Brexit has not happened yet and there are lots of moans still up for grabs, Labour has imploded and UKIP doesn’t appear to be making much headway yet the Lib/Dems (in this polls) have climbed a wee 3% in about 8 months…It’s not great, is it?

    The only microscopic crumbs the Lib’Dems can take from this poll are..1 they have reached the same VI as UKIP and 2, Scotland, in the “likely to vote” table they are polling just 3% behind Labour who are on 9%.

  19. Gareth Wilson

    Seems to confirm my view that there are a number of remainers out there who are very angry and have flocked to the liberal cause. That coupled with a return of voters who did not want their party soiled by power and are happy with it as a party of protest have led to spectacular local ward victories. But then if you attack a platoon with a battalion that is what happens.On a national scale it will be different as perhaps is shown by those wards which they were unable to swamp and in consequence did nothing.
    It creates a media agenda and is quite clever and it excites Smithy on the pB site unduly but we shalll see if it has legs beyond Brexit.

  20. Looking at the Scottish tables again based on those likely to vote, UKIP overtakes the Lib/Dems and relegates them to 5th place. Hmm.. this is tragic.
    …………..
    “While I’m here, I should also mention a BMG Scottish poll that came out at the start of the week (I’ve been laid low with a heavy cold). Voting intention in a second independence referendum stood at YES 49%(+3.5%), NO 49%(-3.5%)”
    ________

    In the event of a second independence referendum, it will be interesting to see how the Scottish Lib/Dems champion Scotland staying in the union outside the Union..If I remember they were the cheerleaders for continued EU integration during the 2014 vote.

    AW. Hope you recover from your cold soon. Lemsip max sachets worked for me.

  21. # staying in the union outside the Union should be outside the EU.

  22. @Allan C

    I don’t think too many people are saying there’s a LD surge under way. It is more a case of saying that they are recovering, and circumstances suggest a surge is possible.

    Copeland and Stoke don’t look likely territory, and they will be happy with respectability. The real test will be the local elections in May, where they are likely to do well. The unalloyed Remain stance is electorally appealing, and they have been doing well in council by-elections.

    It would be interesting to know how they stand on vote share in the seats to be contested, and whether there is any chance that they could outperform Labour nationally.

  23. @Allan Christie
    You do enjoy being the antithesis of Saffer’s relentless LibDem optimism, don’t you? Only you could describe a poll showing a 3% increase as a ‘car crash’ for the party concerned!

    I don’t think anyone (except some tongue-in-cheek Tories!) have suggested the LDems should go back to their seats and prepare for government – however the combination of doubled membership, eight months of almost continuous local by-election wins, Witney followed by Richmond Park, and a pretty clear and unique policy line on the issue of the day suggest that they will be more of an influence on the result in 2020 than previously expected.

    What I find fascinating is the churn here since 2015….

    The main moves appear to be Labour to LDem (about 2.5% of voters) and UKIP to Tory(1% of voters), but also high levels of movement between non-voters and Labour in both directions.

    What there ISN’T, which is more interesting to me, is any real sign of soft Tory remain voters switching to LDem, nor of many Labour voters switching to UKIP in any numbers.

    These seem to be the expectations of LDem and UKIP optimists respectively, yet neither appear to be in evidence, at least not yet; if they did appear as real trends, they are potential game changes in each case…

  24. Having had a quick look at the seats coming up in May, there does seem to be fertile ground for the LibDems, so something quite significant might happen.

    Another interesting feature might be the performance of independents, who have been doing quite well in recent by-elections.

  25. Millie

    “Having had a quick look at the seats coming up in May, there does seem to be fertile ground for the LibDems, so something quite significant might happen.”

    I agree with you, i think the LDs will make significant gains in the May elections, taking seats from both Tory and Labour. I think the Tories will make gains from Labour and possibly UKIP. I expect UKIP yo lose some seats.

  26. MILLIE

    The Lib/Dems have done quite well in local by-elections…I give them that but in some cases, it was more to do with what disgusting creature was being booted out rather than voter love affair with the Lib/Dems.

    I get confused with people commenting on the Lib/Dems. In one thread peeps attribute their by-elections success to them supporting remain and in other threads, peeps say it has nothing to do with the EU and so on.
    …….
    “Copeland and Stoke don’t look likely territory, and they will be happy with respectability”
    ______

    But then other peeps have harped on about how well the Lib/Dems did in leave voting areas during recent by-elections so why such low expectations for the two Westminster by-elections?

    I love my weather forecasts, maybe I should check what way the wind is blowing before I comment on the Lib/Dems ;-) If you know what I mean….. :-)

  27. Millie

    On the Rugby I agree England played much better than against France. Wales played above themselves for large parts of the match and made the Englnd back row (an inexperianced lash-up due to injuries) struggle for much of the game. It was the substitutes who injected more pace and a missed touch kick by Wales that led to Daley’s brilliant try. I expect changes for the Italy match but we will want a bonus point win.

  28. There is a lot of flak flying (perhaps inappropriate due to stories about Lewis “gun” military record) about JC this morning. and the demise of labour.

    JC is not the cause of labour decline. Labour has not won a general election since 1974 ie 46 years in 2020 save under Blair who is viewed as a class traitor.Since that date 4 different labour leaders have tried and failed.

    Is the unpalatable truth (to some) that it is not the leader who is to blame but it is the party and its policies ?. It is no point appointing a new leader who follows the same policies that have failed to win an election for 46 years .The electorate are saying something. The difficulty for labour is that only somebody who follows those same policies can be elected leader in the current enviroment.

  29. Refereee!!!!!

  30. @TOH – in agreement with you re the rugby, although I thought England were flattered somewhat by Wales’ rather sterile attack lines. A better team would have beaten England, although to be fair, their defence did put in a good effort.

    But for yet another huge Welsh mistake in the last five minutes of a match, the talk would have been of England fluffing another big Cardiff occasion and about how their back row lacks strength in depth.

    I think England will improve, but Wales really have to sort out their attack lines. On the one occasion they got it right and set up an effective dummy angle, they carved England’s defence open with ease.

    Not overly hopeful that Scotland can pull off another surprise this week in Paris, but we can just hope their forwards aren’t too badly mauled.

  31. Reposting from something I wrote late last evening, on the previous thread:

    The “What party do you generally identify with..” is indeed fascinating

    (Q 5 asks “Q5. Generally speaking, do you think of yourself as Conservative, Labour, Liberal Democrat, UKIP, SNP, Plaid Cymru or another party?”

    Answers – Con 29% Lab 28% LD 7% UKIP 8% Green 3% SNP 4%)
    Con and Lab almost identical, which implies that some of the strong Con VI is soft and vulnerable, and that there are potential Lab voters out there, currently planning to lend their votes elsewhere. Potentially therefore, it’s not impossible for Labour to revive – if they just sort out their current problems with leadership and messaging.

    I’ve been digging into the cross-breaks elsewhere, and comparing with the last Comres tables, for June 2016

    http://www.comresglobal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Sunday-People-Independent_Political-Poll_June-2016-33014.pdf

    That comparison shows, for instance, that the Labour decline in VI is largely from losing their own 2015 voters since June.. Back then,
    87% of their 2015 voters intended to stay with them. That has since dropped to 78%, As Mike Smithson has noted, 12% of 2015 Lab voters now say they plan to vote LD: in June, that was just 3%.
    One of the features that strikes me in the cross-break trend comparison is that the LibDem improvement (+3% nationally) is concentrated in the youngest age groups: +8% for 18-24, +9% for 25-34.

    This suggests that perhaps the youngsters are beginning to forgive the LD the coalition years, on the basis of remain sentiment. (This would tie in with a recent report on an LD website, Libdemvoice I think it was, that Clegg was recently cheered in a student meeting!)

  32. BIGFATRON
    @Allan Christie
    “You do enjoy being the antithesis of Saffer’s relentless LibDem optimism, don’t you? Only you could describe a poll showing a 3% increase as a ‘car crash’ for the party concerned”
    ________

    Well in the wider context of things a 3% increase for the Lib/Dems is a poor showing. Okay, I understand Tim Farron has less charisma than something Les Stroud would pull out from a frozen Canadian pond but the relentless pro-EU message he and his party are megaphoning around the airwaves don’t appear to be a big hit with the voters in the national polls.
    …………
    “What there ISN’T, which is more interesting to me, is any real sign of soft Tory remain voters switching to LDem, nor of many Labour voters switching to UKIP in any numbers”
    _________

    I do agree with you on this…Perhaps it’s down to the way TM is handling Brexit. Loyal Tories who voted remain giving her the benefit of the doubt and hard Brexit Labour supporters happy with her hard Brexit stance and in turn relegating the need to vote for UKIP.

  33. On the Lib Dems, they are light up front and struggle to get much good quality possession, but they do have a very agile and fast back row and if they get the chance they can get amongst their opponents and disrupt things quite effectively.

    I expect they will go for plenty of high balls, especially in Stoke, and look to disrupt Labour’s defence. The longer Brexit goes on with them still being in the game, they will feel in with a chance.

  34. Alec

    Nice to agree, it was a splendid game, Wales played very very well for most of the game but at last England seem to be achieving what all great teams have to do and that is winning when all seems lost.

    I’m looking forward to the Scotland game, they played really last week and just managed to keep their lead against Ireland. Will they manage to play well for 80 minutes against a very physical French side? That is my worry for them.

  35. S THOMAS

    Referee!!!!

    I thought the French ref had a splendid game. I can only remember one error and that was an English offside near their own line which was missed.

  36. @TOH – besides – what do women know about rugby?

    Pah!

  37. @ Saffer

    The problem for any Labour Leader, with the current membership and PLP is to reconcile the young/metropolitan support of EU membership and the Older/Northern constituency support of Brexit: add to this the toxic problem of immigration for the Labour Party and leadership change seems a Titanic Deckchair exercise

  38. Alec

    Having watched part of Englands 63-0 win over Wales I guess the English women know a bit!

    :-)

  39. @TOH – got a point there.

    Maybe Mrs Thomas is Welsh? Would explain the complaints?

  40. @Alan Christie

    I do wish you would stop belittling the LibDem improvement. You ask

    “Where is this much talked about Lib/Dem surge? ”

    Take a look at the figures, and you will see, An improvement of just 3% in VI in eight months admittedly doesn’t seem like much, but that’s off a small base. A useful feature of the Comres tables is that they show not just %ages, but also the numbers of voters they represent.

    For LD, that has gone from 96 000 to 139 000 during this period – an increase of 45% (for those under 35 the improvement is even stronger, more than doubling).

    For Con, which everybody agrees are riding high, their improvement in actual numbers is from 430 000 to 498 000, an improvement of 16%.

    (Lab, on the other hand, are down by 14% and UKIP have almost halved, down 44%)

    Obviously, even with this %age “surge” in VI, it’s still not enough to make a great difference to actual results in a GE.

    The point is, that the progress is a continuing trend, as shown by local by elections, and could even be accelerating. By the time we get to a real election, these figures could have changed substantially – especially if the LD pull off some more surprises in parliamentary by elections, as they have done in Witney and Richmond, as well as the steady stream at local level.

  41. Allan Christie: “the relentless pro-EU message he and his party are megaphoning around the airwaves don’t appear to be a big hit with the voters in the national polls.”

    Well, an advance from 8 to 11% represents a 37.5% improvement, which is not negligible.

    On the other hand, what of Nuttall and the relentless anti-EU message he and his party are megaphoning around the airwaves? A decline from 19 to 11%, or a fall of 42%.

    Selective commentary can be an effective polemical tool.

  42. @ Gareth Wilson

    “As a Lib Dem Parliamentary candidate in a nearby constituency, I’m amazed by the ferocity of our activists down there in what by all pollsters looks like a completely lost cause. There’s people coming in from all over the place on a daily basis”

    Thanks for that bit of info from the ground in Stoke. I have no local knowledge at all, but it ties in well with the sense I’ve been getting from discussion on other sites. It’s worth remembering here, the recent local by election results from Sunderland, Rotherham,and the Cotswolds, where the LD didn’t just pull off surprise wins, they did so in landslides, with massive swings, on the back of exactly the type of sheer hard graft that you describe them putting in, for Stoke.

    Local by elections are different to parliamentaries and much more volatile. LibDems are not going to achieve the same massive swings of 35 or 40% in Stoke – but they don’t need to. A much more moderate swing, in a 4 way contest with the Brexit vote split could conceivably produce a surprise LD win.

    I’m not suggesting that they WILL win – but I do think it’s not as far-fetched a thought as it seems at first glance.

  43. Women take more sick leave because they are the ones who more often than not stay home to look after their sick kids. Most companies won’t accept ‘I can’t come in as my kid is sick’.

  44. SAFER & SOMERJOHN

    Okay, let’s agree…The Lib/Dems have made modest gains and polling suggests their VI is trending (slowly) upwards.

    As you say…The party won a spectacular by- election in Richmond so I will be expecting to see some sort of success in the two upcoming by-elections, namely pushing Labour hard and massively increasing their support.

    I will try and contain my excitement commenting on Lib/Dem fortunes until after the tow by-elections, then hopefully we can have some clear indication where the party is at.
    ……………….
    “On the other hand, what of Nuttall and the relentless anti-EU message he and his party are megaphoning around the airwaves? A decline from 19 to 11%, or a fall of 42%”

    “Selective commentary can be an effective polemical tool”
    _________

    That’s a very good point..Perhaps my tinted sunglasses need a little colour filter recalibration between Lib/Dem bright yellow and UKIP purple and you’re also right, Selective commentary can be an effective polemical tool…I’m glad we’re all blessed with this tool on UKPR ;-)

    Agreement at last!!

  45. I w as complaining about my moderation not the game !!

  46. Allan Christie: “Agreement at last!!”

    The graciousness of UKPR posters is a shining beacon in a dark world.

  47. @Mrs Thomas – understood. Your post must have been offside.

    On the Lib Dems;

    I the perennial issue with the smaller parties in a FPTP system isn’t so much how their gross VI moves, but rather how it impacts upon individual seat results. Even here, the issue isn’t always about how many seats they win, but how their vote share splits and divides the potential winners votes.

    A 3% ‘surge’ for the Lib Dems certainly doesn’t look that stunning on the face of it, but if that is disproportionately concentrated in one or two stronger areas, then this could – literally – change the course of history.

    For eample, Lib Dem activists are extremely chipper in those SW seats they lost to Cons in 2015. They think they have repaired the damage and are on course to take back quite a few of these. That’s a potential direct effect of a 3% VI increase, but then think about Pudsey (Con hold) and Morley & Outwood (Con gain from Lab). In both of these seats Lab gained, but Cons gained more, with the biggest movement being the collapse of the Lib Dem vote. I imagine that all else being equal (which I know it isn’t) had the Lib Dem held a little higher, we wouldn’t have had a Con majority, no hard Brexit, and possibly no Brexit at all.

    I’m with those thinking that @AC’s dismissal of this is premature. We’re a long way from understanding exactly what might come of this, but I would expect a relatively small change in Lib Dem fortunes to have quite a big impact on the results.

    One thing is worth considering – if the Lib Dems lost a great deal of support from left leaning liberals over their time in coalition, those Lib Dems who backed Cameron in 2015 to keep out Lab/SNP are equally likely to feel betrayed by May for her hard Brexit stance.

  48. Brexit somewhere along the line in the next 2/3 years is going to hit people in the pocket (hard brexit even more so). Brexit will still have a lot to say in the next GE. I can see the LDs gaining more and more votes over the next few years.

  49. @WB

    “leadership change seems a Titanic Deckchair exercise”

    Not quite. Currently, Labour are arguing whether the passengers prefer the old-fashioned British deckchair or the newfangled European sun-lounger, as a method to avoid thinking about the iceberg. After all, 16 watertight compartments/30% core vote makes the ship/party unsinkable, doesn’t it?

  50. Wyrm @WB

    Don’t worry about the iceberg. It’s the raging inferno in the coal bunkers that endangers the integrity of the fabric of SS Labour.

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