The Times this morning has the latest YouGov voting intention figures – CON 42%(+3), LAB 28%(-2), LDEM 9%(+1), UKIP 11%(-2). While the size of the lead isn’t quite as large as the seventeen points ICM showed earlier in the week, it’s a another very solid lead for the Conservatives following their party conference, matching the lead May had at the height of her honeymoon. Full tabs are here.

While I’m here I’ll add a quick update on two other recent YouGov polls. First some new London polling, which shows extremely positive ratings for Sadiq Khan. 58% of people think he is doing well as London mayor, only 14% think he is doing badly. Mayors of London seem to get pretty good approval ratings most of the time (both Ken Livingstone and Boris Johnson normally enjoyed positive ratings), I don’t know if that’s down to the skills of the individual politicians who have held the job so far or whether the public judge them by different standards to Westminster politicians. Never the less, it’s a very positive start for Khan, with net positive approval ratings among supporters of all parties except UKIP. Full tabs are here.

Finally, since the subject keeps popping up, some polling on the Royal Yacht. The public oppose replacing the Royal Yacht with a newly commissioned vessel by 51% to 25%. They would also oppose recommissioning the old Royal Yacht Brittania, but by a smaller margin (42% opposed, 31% support). The argument that the cost of the Yacht would be justified by the its role in promoting British trade and interests oversees does not find favour with the general public – 26% think the cost can be justified, 57% think it cannot. Full results are here.


607 Responses to “YouGov/Times – CON 42, LAB 28, LDEM 9, UKIP 11”

1 2 3 4 5 13
  1. PETER CAIRNS (SNP)

    Your’s to Candy

    “Utter Little Englander codswollop.”

    You seem to be moving in the same direction as Tancred. Why not politely say that you disagree and then give your view why plus IMO as it is only your opinion.

    I must say I really look forward to the time AW can spend more time looking at what’s posted. This used to be a pleasant site.

  2. @Candy – “The mushroom farmers could increase their prices and lose market share, as consumers switch to buying something else.”

    So what you’re saying is that the RoI mushroom suppliers could demand that Tesco’s increase the price they pay for their products?

    Might be worth a try?

  3. Candy

    Interesting piece from from Krugman, not my favourite economist mind. Thanks for the reference.

  4. @toh

    You need to understand the difference between de jure and de facto power and legitimacy. Once you do you will understand you are wrong.

  5. HIRETON

    We shall see what happens then. Events will prove one of us correct.

  6. @Alec

    Suppliers can charge whatever they want, but will make no sales if buyers refuse to purchase.

    Take wine for example, we import most of it, but Kantar Worldpanel, (consumer analysts) say that the prices we have paid for wine in the three months to 11 September have dropped by 2.4%. While the pound has been falling. How is this possible? They report it is due to consumers substituing cheaper stuff – so less champagne drunk and more prosecco, and the bill falls despite the weaker pound. In this game, those who keep their prices high simply go bust. Those who hold prices may keep market share, but they will be hurting badly. The ideal solution for them is to find another market – but demand is very weak in the eurozone.

    This is happening all over. This is an open economy that imports from across the world, and there is always someone willing to sell cheaper and always consumers ready to substitute. Suppliers have very little pricing power.

  7. TOH: “Yours to Candy
    “Utter Little Englander codswollop.”
    You seem to be moving in the same direction as Tancred. Why not politely say that you disagree and then give your view why plus IMO as it is only your opinion.”

    ****

    TOH, I think you should see Peter Cairns’ tone as a response to Candy’s ” It’s a pity the chicken little remainers can’t see it.”

  8. Candy: “the prices we have paid for wine in the three months to 11 September have dropped by 2.4%. While the pound has been falling. How is this possible? ”

    Partly it may be due to consumers trading down, as you suggest, but more importantly, most retailers have currency hedges in place which protect them for a while against the falling pound. Most retailers and commentators seem to be suggesting that exchange rate induced price rises will only really hit the shelves in January. Plus, of course, they may have written their contracts in sterling (which would explain the pain for Irish mushroom growers).

  9. P.S. On the Irish mushroom farmer problem: the real question is, why arn’t they selling to the eurozone. After all the whole point of the euro was to make it easy to sell without currency issues.

    As soon as the pound fell, they should have been looking to sell to the European supermarkets, to protect their profits. That clearly hasn’t happened – they’re acting like the UK market is the only one they have access to, and a simple currency movement is enough to wipe them out.

    Which hints that something is very wrong in the single market, isn’t it?

  10. Official inflation figures include ‘ajustments’ because of people trading down to cheaper and probably lower quality good. Thats a con, you can’t say inflation doesn’t exist because people switch brands. Lower quality for the same price is still inflation. Then there’s the trick that manufacturers do and official statistics often chose not to adjust for. They reduce the size of the product, 550g instead of 600g. Again the same price for less is still inflation.

    So if the wine Bill is falling because people are switching brands then that could well be the consequence of inflation.

  11. Abit more on the Irish mushroom industry:

    “The weakening of the sterling is having such a damaging effect because the marketing companies that sell Irish mushrooms negotiate their contracts in sterling. In addition, mushroom prices are forward agreed, generally for contract periods of up to 12 months. As they are fixed contracts, mushroom producers cannot renegotiate the price the receive.”

    That’s from:

    http://www.farmersjournal.ie/mushroom-industry-thrown-into-turmoil-by-brexit-227630

    where there’s a lot more detail. Apparently the companies that have gone bust accounted for €7m out of the €120m annual sales to the UK, so comparatively small producers.

    As to why they don’t export to other EZ countries, if the company below is typical, it may be because they produce there:

    “Monaghan Mushrooms ….. a world-leading, international company with a 3,500-strong workforce. Our Group Headquarters is situated in Tyholland, Co. Monaghan. Nestled in the rural Irish countryside, we are just 1.5 hours from the main cities of Belfast and Dublin. We have farms, pack houses, compost yards and offices across Ireland, the UK, the Netherlands, Germany and Canada.”

  12. @Somerjohn

    There is nothing stopping a small mushroom farmer negiotiating a new contract with a European supermarket, and getting a bridging loan on the strength of it, to tide them over the period till their sterling contract runs out. The Irish govt is offering cheap loans to them for precisely this reason.

    The real question is why they didn’t do that…

  13. Candy: “There is nothing stopping a small mushroom farmer negiotiating a new contract with a European supermarket, and getting a bridging loan on the strength of it, to tide them over the period till their sterling contract runs out.”

    You make it sound so quick and easy! Have you any business experience?

    But I suspect supermarket mushrooms are pretty much a commodity product, with low profit margins. The cost of transport to mainland Europe may well be the problem as the route is via the UK. I don’t think you can blame either the EU or Irish farmers for the cost of crossing the Irish Sea and English Channel. In fact, one of the main aims of EU regional policy is to improve transport links and reduce costs within the single market.

  14. On the immigration front, here’s an example of a problem which provoked Brits into voting Leave:

    http://www.indeed.co.uk/m/viewjob?jk=b1fafffd77512786

    It is a job ad for an HGV Driver (Class 2) in Bristol, written entirely in Polish, with no English version. In other words the agency placing the ad decided it was a reserved job for Poles. And it was posted 10 days ago, so post referendum and people still haven’t learnt lessons.

    It is this kind of thing that winds up voters something chronic. They just want a fair go – that means jobs fairly advertised so anyone with qualifications can apply. The whole european culture of prioritising jobs for your mates and your family and your ethnic group is just toxic and is responsible for the poor performance of their economies. And this toxic culture was being imported into Britain.

    Maybe this agency thinks that Britain is going to cave on free movement and they can continue their improper recruiting practices. The only way to end stuff like this is to end the influx of people coming in, so that employers are forced to advertise to locals.

  15. FT reporting that May has assured Nissan that it will be protected against post Brexit tariffs. Apparently the Government is looking at ways of keeping certain industries in the UK within the customs union.

    If true, this suggests two things:

    A. The UK Government is not confident of securing a general trade agreement which will not be seriously detrimental to key economic sectors.

    B. Bits of the UK might not be Brexiting!

    I don’t think it’s a spoof.

  16. Hireton

    If the UK govt is going to subsidise Nissan to keep them here, it’s going to have to offer the same deal to other companies. And surely this will be contrary to WTO rules?

  17. @somerjohn

    You would think so. Perhaps that is why they are looking at “bonded factories” staying within the Customs Union?!

  18. It seems that the HGV driver posts are being advertised in English on the same website and were advertised a few days before the Polish version was posted.

  19. @Candy – “….the real question is, why arn’t they selling to the eurozone.”

    No. The real question is whether you are prepared to admit prices will rise. Everything else is chaff.

    “the prices we have paid for wine in the three months to 11 September have dropped by 2.4%. While the pound has been falling. How is this possible? ”

    If you read what Kantar’s say – see here – http://www.harpers.co.uk/news/kantar-worldpanel-alcohol-sales-help-keep-grocery-figures-in-the-black/542524.article
    – you can see that retailers launched ‘promotional events’, which will have helped generate the 8.5% increase in volumes, including 36% increase in champagne sales, alongside the unit price falls. You seem factually incorrect there/

    The promotions were time limited, so it’s likely we will see unit prices rise again soon.

    Your clutching here, trying not to see the obvious, which is that Brexit created a devaluation which will import inflation.

  20. SOMERJOHN

    I agree, I missed that, Candy is as out of order as Peter is.

  21. TOH
    ‘I do not expect Tory rebels on the issue.’

    There were several Tory rebels when the issue arose in the last Parliament. Moreover, a number of Tory MPs have already voiced opposition to the proposals – including Peter Bone.Apparently there is strong opposition from MPs in the NorthWest in particular – and several from Wales are likely to rebel. A senior Tory has estimated that there is a 60:40 chance against the Boundary changes being accepted.

  22. Now finishing a 3 week holiday in Italy.

    While I wouldn’t want Brexiteers on here to take it personally, we have been describing their vote in increasingly vituperative terms, with every fall in the value of sterling!

  23. On the Royal Yacht question I am surprised sir Philip Green has not recommended his vessel Lionheart be loaned to the nation for negotiating trade deals. Given the messy circumstances he allowed the BHS pension to fall into it is the least he can do!

  24. OldNat

    You should be flogging them our whisky to balance that out

  25. The FT today has an article by David Willetts which sums up well why sovereignty and independence depends on our economic health as much as anything else:

    https://www.ft.com/content/9f73f146-91ea-11e6-a72e-b428cb934b78

    “A falling pound also raises deep questions about Britain’s role in the world. Brexiters argued that leaving the EU was an opportunity for Britain to be more global and engaged. We must certainly aim to deliver that kind of Brexit but a weak pound cuts against that. It diminishes Britain.”

    “A weak currency makes it harder to make a constructive impact in the wider world. Our international activities become more expensive and may shrink as a result. The budget for diplomatic posts and activities abroad is hit, as is the real value of the defence budget with its substantial procurement of kit from abroad. The overseas aid budget buys less.”

    “A weak currency can affect national power even more vividly. I was in the Treasury during the Falklands war in 1982 and we thought that the role of financial policy in that British triumph was underestimated. The Falklands finally laid the ghosts of Suez. Britain’s failure at Suez in 1956 was not a failure of our armed forces, but of a weak economy dependent on overseas borrowing and meant we had to throw in the towel when the Americans threatened to veto any loans to us.”

  26. Friend of mine is a Selfridges manager and says business is booming due to sterling losing ground.
    Swings and roundabouts.

  27. Just turning back to the latest polling. It is utterly dreadful for Labour irrespective of any May honeymoon and post Conference bump.

    On Trump surely the Police have to interview this man with a view to multiple charges for sexual assault. It seems bizarre that he is still in a position to run for high office.

  28. One of the odd things about some Brexiteers apparent insistence that there is no reason for price rises and that suppliers manufacturers, wholesalers and customers could just relocate or switch to other sources or products, is that this comes straight out of the never never land book of economic theory.

    As with all things Brexit, the positives are banked as dead certainties, while the negatives are seen as plots, profiteering or other such unnecessary evils visited upon us.

    If there are abundant strategies available that will ensure no price rises will occur here, then presumably our overseas competitors can adopt the same kind of strategies to compete with our reduced price exports? In which case, we don’t get the inflation, nor do we get the export boost.

  29. @Jasper22 – “Friend of mine is a Selfridges manager and says business is booming due to sterling losing ground.
    Swings and roundabouts.”

    I think that is the key. Some businesses will do well with this, others badly, and over time adjustments will be made.

    The difficulty is that due to our trade deficit, especially our goods deficit, voters will tend to feel the bad stuff more than the good.

    For me, sterile arguments about whether prices will or won’t rise and who is to blame, really aren’t the point (especially not on UKPR). The point is how a highly visible thing like food and fuel price inflation, stacked up against much less visible benefits, like increased export volumes and better margins for exporting companies, will affect opinions.

    The case for Brexit based inflation has now been made by the BoE, and so any price rises are likely to be blamed on Brexit from no on, so I suspect this may be something to watch that could have consequences on opinion.

  30. Amongst all the negativity about our continent, it’s great to record an amazing milestone in the progress of an astonishing European success story.

    Airbus has just delivered its 10,000th airliner.

    While Britain opted out in 1969, Hawker Siddeley stayed involved to design the A300’s wings, backed by a loan from Germany. Which is why we still have Airbus plants in Britain, designing and making all the wings for Airbus.

  31. Alec

    Will the rising prices be blamed on brexit or on the dastardly Europeans? Like many things in public opinion we might have evidence based reasons to explain events but the narrative might ignore the evidence. Without wishing to reignite an old debate an example could be….. The role of public spending in the 2008 crash.

    At the moment the brexiters are trying to pin the rise in prices on unscrupulous multi national companies which may or may not be fair. The question is will they succeed or will they deflect to another convenient target? Will the public be in the mood for blaming the rise in prices on their decision to leave the EU or will a softer option blaming someone or some other entity be more appealing?

    While I think its obvious that the fall in the pound is going to cause a large increase in inflation and would hold the cack handed approach to brexit by the govt responsible for much of that, its far from certain that the public will see it that way. Stories of price gauging and/or incompetence by large companies will probably be more seductive to the general public and if there is a way to directly blame the EU that would be well received I think.

  32. Re: Brexit and economic woes. Yes, sure there will be some economic consequences, but these will probably be short-term (i.e. up to 5 years), but so what? As TOH has often said, we expect a bit of short term turmoil. The BoE worrying that inflation might rise to 3%? What a joke! Many of us have lived through 20%+ inflation in the 1970s.

  33. The strange thing is that the EU, as it was before June 23rd, does not exist anymore.

    Right from the start we have had Juncker talking about Britain being ‘punished’. He first said it back in January, “If Britain votes to leave they will be treated as traitors, and traitors must be punished”. We have heard ‘punished’ from Hollande, Scheuble, Tusk, and various members of the Commission as well as Juncker. It got so bad that even Barnier, chosen as a hardline no concessions negotiator, has been trying to soften the message.

    It is a strong word that, ‘punished’. Supposed someone on the UK was going around saying Germans must be punished, or Poles must be punished. There would be uproar, and rightly so. It is extreme and violent language; it is inexcusable, but that is what the EU has been doing.

    I find it ironic that Donald Tusk uses this language, then complains loudly when Poles in Britain are assaulted (to my great regret). Well duh …

    Hollande said only this week, “There must be a threat, there must be a price”. A ‘threat’, again the same language. In three short months the EU has changed itself from a Utopian Club to something rather nasty, all vestiges of ‘Utopian’ are gone; it is a street gang. The quotes are all there, they will never go away, and they will colour political discourse within the EU for years to come. The EU has blithely thrown away something very valuable, and for very little reward.

    I think it almost inevitable that there will be a heavy price to pay for that, although I make no predictions about what it will be.

  34. BBZ

    Re Current Article 50 court cases

    Of course strictly speaking, you are correct that they are only concerned with making notice under article 50 subject to parliamentary approval and not just by the PM. However the people in all these actions, in doing this, actually are hoping that MPs or HOL will vote against and therefore kill Brexit.

    Grahame Pignys Facebook group actually has a draft letter there with the request that you type it up and send it to your MP. It specifically requests that the MP votes against article 50.

  35. @Robert Newark “…actually are hoping that MPs or HOL will vote against and therefore kill Brexit.’

    Precisely, it’s not even disguised.

    The standard opening cue for MPs of ta similar persuasion is “While of course the will of the people should be respected” followed by any line of attack that they hope will do the exact opposite. Anna Soubry being a prime example.

  36. CANDY
    “Which hints that something is very wrong in the single market, isn’t it?”
    Not really, just that it takes time innovation and adjustments to continuously develop. This also goes for the free movement of labour,, so that your following post:
    “The only way to end stuff like this is to end the influx of people coming in, so that employers are forced to advertise to locals.”
    is palpably not true. As Labour has proposed, under both Milleband and Corbin, the other main way is to legislate against it, regulating against and penalising firms who don’t comply.
    However, these alternatives and investment in capacity building, employment and social structures to cope with influxes of economic migrants to respond to labour needs, as the German establishment at every level – not just Merkel – including city mayors have recognised, also takes time and flexibility. Read the EC 2015 Ageing Report (which I keep plugging) or Jucker’s pre-EC Presidential election speech in Malta of April 2014 on migration policy, or Mogherini’s 2015 statement to Parliament (and to the media) on the need to recognise the social dimensions of economic migration, and you get a sense of the continuity and consistency with which the EC – in some respects ineptly – is forging a long-term strategy for migration and growth, to which May’s Tory Party are opposed.

  37. @JAYBLANC

    I should have said that the Bank of England have failed to meet the target of 2% for 26 months and are not expected to meet it until 2017.

  38. @Alec For me, sterile arguments about whether prices will or won’t rise and who is to blame, really aren’t the point (especially not on UKPR). The point is how a highly visible thing like food and fuel price inflation, stacked up against much less visible benefits, like increased export volumes and better margins for exporting companies, will affect opinions.”

    Well it all depends on how many jobs are created in these export industries that may or may not lead to an average better standard of living. There’ll also be the ability to import food outside of the crazy CAP and the tariffs the EU imposes on such non-custom union countries which will have a deflationary effect on food prices.

    Fundamentally we have no idea what the real economy will look like in 3 years time as there are way too many factors in play allied with a huge amount of uncertainty because of the negotiations. This cannot be resolved until the exit terms are agreed (or not).

    I would hope that the Treasury are modelling a worst case scenario of no deal whatsoever with the EU as a starting point. Anything that can be negotiated that’s better than that scenario would then be a bonus. The UK has to go into the negotiation with that frame of mind. I suspect the EU will be doing the same.

    @Pete B – Agreed the idea that 2%-3% inflation is going to kill us is laughable. We’ve been living in a near deflationary environment for the last 2-3 years somehow people think it’s the modern norm. Since we went metric in 1971 price inflation has compounded to the current 2016 comparison price level by approximately 14 times! Even if we take the lower inflation environment we’ve generally enjoyed since the ERM debacle we’ve seen an 87% increase over the last 23 years.

  39. re advertisements in polish for HGV drivers in Bristol: I understood there is a national shortage of HGV drivers. If you need drivers, creating an advertisement to catch the eye of Poles would make perfect sense. Of course it might antagonise locals, but so much of this immigration issue comes back to real skills shortages inside the UK.

    Maybe there is a shortage of drivers because pay is unattractive, but that once again comes down to different areas of national policy, over the importance placed on wealth redistribution and the drive towards university education rather than vocational. I dont doubt British employers would claim their businesses would become uncompetitive if they paid their drivers more. Then it would be Polish trucking companies employing Polish drivers, instead of English companies.

  40. EDGE OF SEAT

    I read your piece with interest but the problem I have with that sort of argument is that it assumes that the relative value of the £ will stay where it is or lower. History shows us that this is not the case and there will be times in the future when the relative value of the £ increases.

  41. I see reading through this thread there are a couple of vehement posts from remain and leave proponents. Personally I am vehemently pro remain, because of all the negative economic consequences I see for brexit. The point though is that whereas the EU was once a sleepy issue which did not excite people much, it has now become centre stage in UK politics. While the main parties agree they want to leave the EU this may make little difference, but both leave and remain got more votes than either big political party. Partisans on both sides will be influenced in who they support by main party polices leaning their way.

    As I see it, the issue will only be resolved by events, and it is a question of whether economic woes settle down before Brexit takes place, or become worse and call into question whether it should happen at all. This is potentially a seismic political effect, especially on the conservative party which is currently organising Brexit. Labour’s internal wrangles have kept them largely out of the debate, though I notice they have begun sniping at the government over its demonstrated lack of clarity on Brexit thus far.

    I rather think the campaign has let the genie out of the bottle. It has called into question the fundamentals of the UK economy and has shattered international confidence in the UK as a base for industry. Whether or not leaving the EU justifies a loss of confidence in our economic future (though I think it does), the UK has broken the illusion of success the country had enjoyed which has carried it through since 2008. UK economic fundamentals look bad and this just looks like bad management.

    All of which reinforces my view the economy will get worse, and then sentiment on Brexit within the Uk will reverse. The vote was not decisive whatever Leave campaigners say, and they themselves had been preparing to challenge a similar sized loss had the result gone the other way. The result was essentially 1/3 in, 1/3 out, 1/3 abstained. Massive room there for a change of result.

    Labour have engaged in an internal wrangle frankly designed to keep them out of power. They seem to favour keeping their internal opponents out of power over keeping their external opponents out of power, and have done for decades. The conservatives take the reverse view. Labour have a limited time to stop this brawling and start to look like a potential government, but they could still do it. The current poll figures are in my view pretty irrelevant: there is huge consensus they do not look like a government, so hardly surprising. They need to show they can unite and the figures will change.

  42. @Pete B – “The BoE worrying that inflation might rise to 3%? What a joke! Many of us have lived through 20%+ inflation in the 1970s.”

    True, but in the 1970’s, wages rose too. We had a very major house price crash at one point too, masked by price inflation, such that housing got a whole lot cheaper.

    In 2009 (incidentally – the last time the pound fell sharply) we had inflation nudging 4%, so pretty benign according to your assessment, and it really, really hurt.

  43. Other Howard,
    If you look at the long term figures, the pound has fallen steadily since it uncoupled from fixed exchange rates post ww2. This strikes me as a true reflection of the relative economic power of the UK. I think what we are seeing now is in part a catch-up on Uk decline over the last few years which has been precipitated by the Brexit debate. Financiers are really questioning the fundamentals of the Uk economy, and being part of the EU has been the cornerstone of UK policy for 40 years. It replaced a vacuum where we had lost preferential trading rights with the empire. There is nothing in sight to replace membership of the EU.

  44. Another truly awful poll for Labour.

    Are we beginning to see polling confirmation of what has seemed evident and predictable for some time: the decline of UKIP and the recovery of the Lib Dems?

    The LDs continue to perform creditably in local government by-elections, and also seem to be finding candidates.

    I have also noticed that locally-based independent candidates are doing well. Part of an anti-Westminster trend perhaps.

  45. @Millie

    Yes, the LDs seem to be doing well in local elections and the by-election at Witney next week will be a very interesting view of where they are now. As it’s a by-election we should expect quite different results to the national – but instructive nevertheless.

    The big question is how many remainers will vote for the Lib Dems. In theory, there are enough to win the constituency.

    Labour I can’t see any hope for, especially with the LDs providing a sensible voice for those who want continuing close ties with Europe. With the exit of the more extreme elements to Labour (and the subsequent vacuous echo-chamber that they create in that party) it can make the LDs seem more like a reasonable alternative.

    A pity about the Liberal leader, though; I don’t think he helps. Especially with all the tacking-left he did initially in order to get back some of the departed Lib Dem supporters.

  46. ROBERT NEWARK
    Of course strictly speaking, you are correct that they are only concerned with making notice under article 50 subject to parliamentary approval and not just by the PM.

    You happen to be correct that the A50 challenges have mainly been brought by remainers.

    However, given the campaign rhetoric of “bring back control” I am mystified that none of those defenders of whatever the UK constitution is seem to be bothered at the idea of giving any PM the right to repeal acts of parliament without parliamentary consent.

    They may well want EU law and rights repealed ASAP but could live to regret the additional power granted to whoever happens to be in Downing Street over some future issue should the challenge fail.

    In any event, would it not be somewhat embarrassing for HMG should the EC to reject May’s A50 letter on the grounds that it did not meet the UK’s own constitutional requirements, or at least put it to the ECJ for their approval?

  47. Some “imported” inflation to the UK will, over the longer term, be a good thing.

    Of course our currency could be boosted by raising our artificially low interest rates, which could restore things towards a balanced economy…..

  48. BARBAZENZERO @ ROBERT NEWARK

    PS to my previous post….

    I should have added that May could obviate the problem by introducing an enabling bill giving her the right to repeal whatever laws will need to be repealed by issuing A50.

  49. @RN

    “the people in all these actions, in doing this, actually are hoping that MPs or HOL will vote against and therefore kill Brexit.”

    Have they stated this, or is this a demonstrtaion of your mind-reading powers?

    I think it is more accurate to say they hope to kill HARD Brexit. A requirement for parliamentary approval means the executive can’t make Brexit mean whatever they want.

  50. “…which is that Brexit created a devaluation which will import inflation…”

    ___________

    Will?? Will??!!!???…

    It already has if you buy music kit…

1 2 3 4 5 13