ICM have a new poll in the Sun on Sunday with topline figures of CON 39%(+1), LAB 29%(-1), LDEM 9%(+1), UKIP 14%(-1), GRN 4%(nc). This is the first poll conducted since Theresa May became Prime Minister, so may be expected to show a typical “new leader” bounce in government support (when Brown took over in 2007 and Major took over in 1990 the governing party went from being behind to having double-digit leads). The Tory lead is up a little, but not outside the normal margin of error, that said ICM’s previous poll already had an eight point Tory lead, so they were already at a high base.

ICM also did some hypothetical voting intention questions asking about varous leader match-ups. A control question, asking how people would vote if Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn were still leader at the general election has voting intention figures of CON 43%, LAB 28%, suggesting either a significant positive effect from mentioning May or a negative effect from mentioning Corbyn.

Asking how people would vote if Owen Smith or Angela Eagle were Labour leader does not offer any improvement. With Eagle the figures would be CON 43%, LAB 26%. With Smith the figures would be CON 42%, LAB 27%. I should add a heavy caveat here – hypothetical polls like this are popular in advance of leadership elections, but how useful they are is a different question. Respondents don’t necessarily know what the alternative candidates stand for, what they will do or announce, how they may or may not change the party. I add those caveats when the alternative leaders are well known to the public, like Gordon Brown, Boris Johnson and so on. In the case of someone who is as unknown to the general public as Owen Smith, I expect most don’t know who he is or what he even looks like. Nevertheless, the figures will be influential in the debate – rightly or wrongly Corbyn’s supporters within the Labour party will now be able to say there is no polling evidence that his rivals would do any better.

Note that ComRes also have a poll in the Independent/Sunday Mirror, but they are not currently publishing any voting intention figures while they review methods.


481 Responses to “ICM/Sun on Sunday – CON 39, LAB 29, LD 9, UKIP 14”

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  1. I don’t think a second referendum is likely, nor a GE in the near future.

    What I think is possible is an early GE once the EU negotiation is complete, with the Tories taking the deal to the electorate as their manifesto, UKIP opposing it because it doesn’t tow the UK into the middle of the Atlantic and stop all migration, the LDs promising to revoke Article 50 and stop it. And Labour.. well, that depends on whose in charge of course.

    That would mean a theoretical change of Brexit not happening, but only if the SNP, Plaid and LDs (plus maybe Labour) between them had the numbers to stop it, based on a GE result with voters putting their X next to pro-EU candidates. It could be that a UKIP surge could lead FPTP to favour pro-EU parties, by denuding the Tories, although an alternative outcome (if Labour was pro-Remain) would be UKIP surging in the areas that voted heavily Leave.

    As for the drip drip of news about the economy, trade negotations etc. Hold off everyone, on both sides, it’s far, far too early to form any kind of picture either about what the Brexit vote will do to the economy, or what trade deals the UK will be able to arrange in the next 2-3 years.

    Let’s not have months and months of “show and tell”, with quotes from the Mongolian Foreign Minister and production figures from the British Toy Soldier Manufacturor’s Federation each day to try and point-score.

  2. *theoretical chance

  3. @ CMJ

    ‘Perhaps the PLP thinks the LP membership is like my hedge. It had grown massively and was out of control. I battled hard against it and won, albeit with some wounds suffered.’

    The line that is often heard is that the LP operated just fine as it was before the Corbyn surge, and that it doesn’t matter if there is a mass exodus with Corbyn being deposed. So just like your hedge.

    In fact, New Labour were heading towards the US Democrat model of just having supporters and they were steadily hollowing out the branch and constituency structures. This stopped when Ed Miliband was elected.

  4. NEIL A
    Let’s not have months and months of “show and tell”, with quotes from the Mongolian Foreign Minister and production figures from the British Toy Soldier Manufacturor’s Federation each day to try and point-score.

    I agree with most of your post and 100% with the para quoted.

    There’s a big if, though, as it implies that either Holyrood backs down on indyref2 or they lose it.

  5. BARBAZENZERO

    However, the FTPA is silent on the detail of what happens after a lost confidence vote. In the absence of such detail, wouldn’t convention require May first to resign and advise Brenda to ask Corbyn to try to form a government, making him the PM who called the election when his own confidence motion fails a fortnight later?

    You haven’t got the FTPA quite right – the 14 day period starts when the first no confidence motion is passed. A newly appointed PM doesn’t have 14 days after appointment to get a confidence motion through – just however long is left of the initial 14.

    Such a situation is going to cause real problems for the Palace. The no-confidenced PM recommending an alternative is only a matter of convention – what if they don’t? What if there is someone else from the same Party or the opposition who is claiming that they can form a government and get a confidence vote through? Even if it isn’t really plausible should they be given a chance? After all no one knows if they could win a confidence vote till it takes place and it can’t take place till a government has been formed.

  6. @Barbazenzero,

    Sturgeon has some difficult tactical choices to make. Does she try and win indyref2 without actually seeing what the proposed deal with the EU looks like? In some ways that’s easier, but also opens her up to another Project Fear.

    If Scotland leaves and the rUK is outside the single market, there might be customs posts on the border. Scots might not vote for that (but they might – for some it would be a great thing, probably).

    But yes, if Scotland has already gone by 2018-19 then there’s less chance of a GE producing a “reverse-Brexit” majority parliament.

  7. I see that Owen Smith is launching his campaign in Wales. Its interesting as it represents an emphasis on local roots and local community.

    I was impressed by his commitments to end austerity and to invest £300bn in schools and hospitals.

    I wonder how that will go down with the pro-Corbin group; it may attract them.

    Its surely encouraging to Remain people that he wants a fresh referendum.

  8. Her Maj should only invite someone to form a government if she and they believes they can command the confidence of the house.

    There’s absolutely no constitutional requirement for HM to invite Corbyn to form a government if May loses a confidence vote. She doesn’t have to invite anyone, if there’s noone who could command that confidence.

  9. Owen Smith quite clearly signaled a second Referendum if the terms emerging seem unacceptable to the public

    Not sure how he will judge public opinion in advance of Ref2.

    A powerful speaker though , as you would expect from a Welshman.

    Central theme-Labour will not/cannot split.

  10. Owen Smith is launching in Pontypridd, his home town. Far from espresso-swilling metropolitan London. Where a coal mine had been closed by Mrs Thatcher. But where Labour when in power had invested to build new schools.

    He said that he was standing for Prime Minister because it was important that the Labour party speaks for the concerns of people. To end austerity. To invest for ordinary people.

    It will be interesting to see how many members of his party find his words to be moving and inspirational. And how many of those – who want Labour to be in power – will vote for him.

  11. ROGER MEXICO & NEIL A

    Yes, the wonders of an unwritten constitution mean that there is no “rule” on what a PM does in the 14 day gap, but I am not aware of a PM not standing down having lost a vote of confidence. May could indeed suggest appointing another Con but might be very reluctant to do so because it would politicise the monarchy and in any case she might not trust her nominee to hand it back, whereas at least she would be pretty certain Corbyn would fail to remain PM.

    However, May is a grown-up and would be very reluctant to play silly Bs to get around FTPA. The example was more intended to demonstrate how unlikely it is that any PM without a large majority will sneak around it than anything else.

    I disagree with NEIL that Brenda has any meaningful choice in the matter of who to call or any right to call an election without trying an alternative PM first. That would most certainly politicise the Monarchy.

  12. @ ProfHoward

    Well, I don’t think Smith has any chance in the LP.

    You see, on the 27 March he said that he chose to be absent at the Welfare Bill, because he thought it would make Labour soft on welfare. So there goes his credibility about all his plans (obviously recent developments could have made him change his mind).

    Having said that, it may work, after all, people haven’t noticed that we have the most rightwing PM for quarter of a century by all evidence and seemingly chose the narrative of a one nation Tory (she is not).

  13. @profhoward,

    Its surely encouraging to Remain people that he wants a fresh referendum.

    ………..

    Except today’s poll showed the public are firmly behind no second referendum, so not only is Smith at odds with democracy, he is also at odds with public opinion.

    I’ll say it again, when Labour ran the referendum back in 1997 for the Welsh Assembly, they got a 0.3% majority on a 52% turnout and that was enough for the entire Labour front bench and no doubt the likes of Smith to say this was ‘democracy at work’. What a disgrace they are.

  14. Re: Early election

    The fixed term parliament act, like any other act of parliament, can be repealed with a simple majority.

    In the absence of agreement from Labour to end the parliament term within the confines of the act, TM can simply repeal it.

  15. Neil A

    “Sturgeon has some difficult tactical choices to make. Does she try and win indyref2 without actually seeing what the proposed deal with the EU looks like?”

    Leading a government always involves making difficult tactical (and strategic) choices. Keeping your options open, until some of them become unavailable, and having a flexible game plan for how to react to that is wise.

    If there are options to keep Scotland and NI?) in both the UK and EU (maybe the reverse Greenland proposal, or something else), then May has promised to examine such ideas.

    If the UK Government sees value, then that can become part of the “UK approach and objectives for negotiations” – doubtless with some enhancement of Holyrood powers.

    If the UK refuses such “doable” (to quote Mundell) options, than it is the UK that has prevented Scotland from remaining in both Unions.

    If there are no realistic options for keeping Scotland in both Unions, and independence is the only way to stay in the EU, then a referendum forces people who want to be in both, to choose between two mutually exclusive options. That’ll be hard for many, but it’s what the result of indyref2 would come down to.

    To quote your comment from a related context ” it’s far, far too early to form any kind of picture” of the actual circumstances when Sturgeon has to make the decision.

    We may get a little more information after the Extraordinary Summit Meeting of the British-Irish Council this week, when the eight governments involved have had a chance to discuss the implications of the referendum in the UK.

  16. @oldnat,

    I wonder what the Welsh assembly position is? Am guessing ignore the people of Wales?

  17. Rich

    As far as I know, the Senedd has not had a vote on the “position”, following the referendum.

    Presumably the FM of Wales (along with his Cabinet) will have been working out what stance to take in the BIC discussions.

  18. NEIL A
    Sturgeon has some difficult tactical choices to make. Does she try and win indyref2 without actually seeing what the proposed deal with the EU looks like? In some ways that’s easier, but also opens her up to another Project Fear.

    I agree with you there, that it will be difficult, but unless May can find a way to allow Scots to retain free movement, EU citizenship and to elect MEPs I suspect it will happen. The first two would be needed to keep both academia and existing EU members on side.

    Just possibly, May will come up with a brand new Project Fear 3 with some new arguments, but if it’s just a re-heat of the first two it may well not be effective.

  19. @ drmibbles

    “The fixed term parliament act, like any other act of parliament, can be repealed with a simple majority.

    In the absence of agreement from Labour to end the parliament term within the confines of the act, TM can simply repeal it.”

    It’s not that simple. It has to pass through the House of Lords as well, and we all know they canb e a funny bunch at times…..

  20. NORBOLD @ drmibbles
    It’s not that simple. It has to pass through the House of Lords as well, and we all know they can be a funny bunch at times….

    Quite so, plus it was not a Con manifesto commitment and Con do not have an HoL majority.

  21. @RICH

    “Except today’s poll showed the public are firmly behind no second referendum, so not only is Smith at odds with democracy, he is also at odds with public opinion.”

    Can you tell what support was there for the recent Brexit referendum? I would be interested to know. I suspect that outside of the Conservative Party, not much. Politicians don’t necessarily act in accordance with public opinion, other than when it suits them to do so of course.

  22. PROFHOWARD

    Reference to Owen Smith

    “Its surely encouraging to Remain people that he wants a fresh referendum”
    ____

    Even more encouraging for Brxiteers.

    On a second referendum on the EU once a deal has been reached:
    Support: 29%
    Oppose: 57%
    (via ComRes)

  23. Many Labour people are likely to think that Owen made a very very compelling speech.

    He spoke with a Welsh accent.

    Owen Smith said that the new school – where he made his launch – was a symbol of what Labour was all about. Renewal. Hope. Faith that the world can be better if we stand together.

    With a high element of conviction and passion he said Britain was in crisis.

    He said he was proud of his Welsh roots and socialist roots. He saw the need for solidarity. He regards as his heros as Bevan, Hardie.

    His grandparents in the 1930s and 40s: Labour was created for them. It spoke for their hopes and dreams and Labour safeguarded their livelihoods. Many feel Labour has lost its way since then.

    Corbyn is not to blame – he added. He has been right about being against austerity. But we need more than posturing and sloganizing.

    Owen isn’t *just* anti austerity. He is pro-prosperity for working people. With ideas like

    1. Inequality is a disgrace and Labour needs to rewrite Clause 4 to put tackling inequality at the heart of everything we do. This got a LOT of applause and people cheered with massive enthusiasm when he said this.

    2. £200 billion fund investment fund – a British New Deal. Physical and social infrastructure. Roads. Hospitals. Sure start. Every child a chance. Higher education. Again, massive applause from the people listening. This would include putting teeth into the “northern powerhouse” ideas that the Tories have not funded. We have sat back for too long when it comes to investment.

    3. He will bring back the department for Climate Change.

    4. Iraq was a mistake. He will have an *ethical foreign policy*. Labour believes in peace, internationalism, above all else. Not pacifist, but was as a last resort. A War Powers Act to make sure that what’s proposed is in accord with international law.

    5. Heal the Labour party. Put aside the divides. He will have a consultative group of members.

    He said he was not doing it for personal ambition but to save his party and stop it from splitting. There was MASSIVE applause for that point.

    The room was really really packed.

    In response to a question he said that Corbyn and J McDonnell took an ambivalent attitude to the party splitting. There was much tutting at that, and much applause when he spoke again of party unity.

    He spoke strongly in defence of his past working in business when questioned. Again, strong applause.

    He thought that Labour should not have put so many private providers in the NHS.

    He would renationalise rail. (Massive applause).

    He trusts the British people’s judgement in the First referendum. But the British people were lied to. We don’t HAVE to have a second referendum. But we do need to keep an eye on public opinion. You wouldn’t buy a new car without taking it for a test drive, he says.

    The strapline was “Owen Smith – Labour Future”.

    I heard one impartial commentator saying that he was a new John Smith.

    .

  24. I increasingly believe that a second referendum on the EU is not only desirable and necessary, but pretty much unavoidable. If a deal with the EU results in a significant risk to the unity of the UK and a tangible effect on the nation’s economy then the pressure to have one will be difficult to resist. I am sure that the City and big business will demand one.

    May was a closet leaver who reluctantly backed remain as an act of loyalty to Cameron – nothing else. But she is also a realist and a second referendum would be definite – there really would be no way back. My reckoning is that she would welcome the opportunity to bury the issue once and for all.

  25. TANCRED
    @RICH

    “Can you tell what support was there for the recent Brexit referendum? I would be interested to know. I suspect that outside of the Conservative Party, not much. Politicians don’t necessarily act in accordance with public opinion, other than when it suits them to do so of course”
    ______

    This sort of question is boring and pointless. The Tories had an in out EU referendum in their manifesto. The majority of the public came out and voted in the referendum and a result was produced.

    Just because you and the 8 Lib/Dem MP’s disagree with the outcome does not mean we should hold another referendum.

  26. @ALLAN CHRISTIE

    Meaningless – it depends on what the ‘new deal’ is. The poll just shows the limited intellect of many Brexiteers.

  27. @”Well, I don’t think Smith has any chance in the LP.”

    Perhaps he thinks he can do better than this-I mean who wouldn’t ?

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/jeremy-corbyn-labour-shadow-cabinet-thangam-debbonaire-cancer-a7141341.html

  28. @ALLAN CHRISTIE

    “This sort of question is boring and pointless. The Tories had an in out EU referendum in their manifesto. The majority of the public came out and voted in the referendum and a result was produced.”

    No, what you keep repeating ‘ad nauseam’ is boring and pointless.

    You speak as if public opinion is fixed and immovable. Give people a valid reason to vote for something and they will – most of those who voted wanted ‘out’ because they saw no advantages to them of EU membership. This can change once people are presented with real choices, not simply ‘Brexit’.

  29. ASSIDUOSITY

    Thanks for your detailed post to me. I do actually understand and generally accept the research. The analysis fits myself and my wife reasonably well, we are both quite socially conservative.

    It was a rather poor attempt to pull Somerjohn’s leg as he seemed to be in his “superior mode” again. I must stop doing it.

  30. ” If a deal with the EU results in a significant risk to the unity of the UK and a tangible effect on the nation’s economy then the pressure to have one will be difficult to resist”
    __

    Says who? I don’t see polls backing this nor any stuff in the media about it. If the unity of the nation is at stake then that’s up to the Scots to make up their own minds on where they want to be, however it’s not a one way constitutional thing.

    If we held another EU vote as you suggest on the back of saving the Union and it results in a narrow remain vote but England still voted to leave then what? We have at the moment a lot of noise coming from Scotland because they voted remain but what about if England was to be kept in against their wishes?

    And just because it then meant the outcome you wanted we don’t go for the best out of 3?

    A second referendum would be far more damaging for the Union I think but I love all the special attention some peeps are giving to Scotland yet they are probably the same ones who never even bothered or felt Scottish politics was boring.

  31. TANCRED

    “No, what you keep repeating ‘ad nauseam’ is boring and pointless.
    You speak as if public opinion is fixed and immovable. Give people a valid reason to vote for something and they will – most of those who voted wanted ‘out’ because they saw no advantages to them of EU membership. This can change once people are presented with real choices, not simply ‘Brexit”
    ________

    Okay lets agree with your hypothesis. So the economy takes a bit of a dip and in comes a Labour gov and holds another EU referendum to take us back into the EU and this time we are presented with real choices” WOOHOO, despite the former remain side having all the establishment on their side

    Further down the years the UK economy is still sliding and immigration is still rising at unacceptable levels for most voters…..Do we hold another EU referendum?

    I hope so…

  32. PETE1

    Shockingly bad poll for Labour. Obviously not helped by the in fighting and a rabid right wing press we now have.

    The interesting thing about it is that it isn’t a shockingly worse poll though. It shows very little movement from last week, though some from what previous ICM online polling we have had recently:

    13-15/7[1]: Con 39, Lab 29, LD 9, UKIP 14

    8-10/7: Con 38, Lab 30, LD 8, UKIP 15

    1-3/7: Con 37, Lab 30, LD 8, UKIP 15

    24-26/6: Con 36, Lab 32, LD 8, UKIP 15

    27-30/5: Con 36, Lab 31, LD 7, UKIP 15

    But the dramatic changes that Labour’s civil war and a new PM were expected to cause don’t seem to have happened – a 3 point swing at most.

    The latest poll is presumably the weekly online poll[2] that ICM have been releasing on Mondays for some time, which has now been ‘sold’ to the Sun on Sunday, who don’t have a regular pollster (though they’ve used YouGov for one-offs in the past). The reported changes above are from last week’s one of this series. They haven’t always reported Westminster VI, headlining on the referendum intention, but clearly have been asking it from the cross-heads.

    I suspect the methodological changes that ICM implemented last week (which worked a little against Labour) were done so that they had things settled before starting a more prominently published series. So this may become regular, though whether weekly or monthly is another matter. Tables aren’t available yet as no one probably knows how to publish them with a delay on their irritating website.

    [1] I’m guessing that this was a Wed- Fri poll because the Sun online article:

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1456942/prime-ministers-promise-of-brighter-future-outside-eu-greeted-with-a-bounce-in-polls-for-conservative-party/

    doesn’t include the technical data (BPC smacks for the Sun). Though Thur-Sat might also be possible pollsters don’t like weekend working more than anyone else. However this means that this would be a weekday rather than a weekend poll as previous ICM onlines were and that could affect the result.

    [2] Presumably this is a normal weekly commercial omnibus poll, to which they add a few political questions.

  33. @ALLAN CHRISTIE

    Do you not understand that the recent Brexit vote was largely a protest vote by people who wanted to bash the establishment? How many of those who voted leave did so as a result of extensive scrutiny and assessment of all the pros and cons of membership? Very, very few. I would say that most of the leavers seem to have been working and lower middle class Tory/UKIP types who tend to rely on three tabloids (Mail, Sun, Express) as sources for their news and analysis. I am sure that there were also many well educated people who voted Brexit for ideological reasons, but these were a minority and had only these voted to leave then the remain camp would have won comfortably.
    Also, it’s clear that most people voting to leave did not vote for anything specific. They did not heed the warnings from Cameron and Osborne because they did not respect these politicians, but once faced with ‘project reality’ instead of ‘project fear’, and the hard consequences of Brexit becoming apparent, then I believe a substantial number of Brexit supporters would be willing to change their minds.
    I hate referendums because they are cynical mechanism used by politicians to use a snapshot of public opinion in order to justify a radical or controversial policy. However, public opinion can does change.

    “If we held another EU vote as you suggest on the back of saving the Union and it results in a narrow remain vote but England still voted to leave then what?”

    This is unlikely, but in this case the remain vote would still win. I could only see this happening if the Scottish pro-EU vote increases still further and the Welsh vote turns around completely and produces a pro-EU result.

  34. @Barbazenzero

    You could argue that her situation in the HoC is more acute. She just needs to create more peers to solve her Lords problems. However there are no guarantees that the rebels against Cameron who effectively prevented Osborne passing a Budget – a de facto no confidence motion against him – will allow his successor any more leeway.

  35. TANCRED
    @ALLAN CHRISTIE
    Meaningless – it depends on what the ‘new deal’ is. The poll just shows the limited intellect of many Brexiteers.

    I would suggest that it is posts like that which indicate limited intellect.
    Sad really.

  36. There’s always the cricket, currently v. good, finely-poised…

  37. TANCRED

    “Don’t I understand” blah blah blah……

    Yes I perfectly do understand the Brexit result…I voted for it as many other did. So are you suggesting everyone who voted remain were fully aware of what remaining in the EU meant? How many of remain voters voted remain because of false information?

    And you don’t like referendums…Okay so would you rather have the Tories (who won 36%) saying in their manifesto pre GE that if they win the General election they will take us out of the EU without a referendum?

    Yup that seems logical….36% vote Tory and we leave the EU is much better than holding a national referendum.

    I do have one question…If not a referendum then how do you suggest we leave the EU?

  38. WOLF
    You could argue that her situation in the HoC is more acute.

    Agreed. I suspect she’ll try an invisible holding action while she gives the 3 Brexiteers time either to hang themselves [metaphorically!] or to return laden with the goodies to tumultuous acclaim. What she does next will very much depend on which!

  39. Carfrew

    Absolutely correct, I’ll take your advice and get back to the Test Match, great fight.

  40. Today and on other occasions Tancred seems to be arguing that only he or she and people of equivalent intelligence should be allowed to vote. I wonder how this would be administered. IQ tests at the polling station perhaps? Or should we just disenfranchise anyone who never went to university?

  41. Cricket’s even more exciting than the phantom Brexit…

  42. Only peeps who sufficiently appreciate cricket should be allowed to vote…

  43. Carfrew.

    Agreed. These two might see us home. Bit like 1981!

  44. THE OTHER HOWARD
    TANCRED
    @ALLAN CHRISTIE
    Meaningless – it depends on what the ‘new deal’ is. The poll just shows the limited intellect of many Brexiteers.
    …..
    “I would suggest that it is posts like that which indicate limited intellect.
    Sad really”
    ____

    Yeah its waffle at its purity and I’m hovering over my browser Nuke button should it again descend into name calling.

  45. @Neil A
    ‘Her Maj should only invite someone to form a government if she and they believes they can command the confidence of the house.’

    There are such precedents. In December 1905 Balfour’s Tory Government resigned and Campbell – Bannerman was invited to form a Government despite the Tories still having a majority of over 100. CB then called an election for January 1906 and a Liberal landslide resulted.

  46. Meanwhile in Germany, Brexit seem to be good for Merkel, if
    Reuter’s can be believed:

    Support for the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany (Afd) has fallen dramatically amid party infighting, racially-tinged criticism of Germany’s popular national soccer team and even a local backlash over Britain’s vote to leave the EU.

    Analysts said the unexpectedly rapid implosion of the far-right AfD from 15 percent in opinion polls two months ago to a year-low of 8 percent on Wednesday could make it easier for Angela Merkel to retain power in next year’s election.

    Because Merkel’s center-right conservatives, their center-left Social Democrat coalition allies and other parties reject any AfD alliance, the populist party’s rise had cast doubt on her hopes of finding a partner big enough for a fourth term.

    See Germany’s far-right AfD implodes over Brexit, good for Merkel

  47. @ToH

    Indeed. For as we know, it’s all very well peeps criticising some Leave voters for not knowing about passporting and other things, but then again how many Remainers knew about TTIP and how EU should be doing Capital Transfers??…

  48. @Pete B

    “Agreed. These two might see us home. Bit like 1981!”

    ———

    Jeez Pete, you just jinxed it!!

  49. Whoops!

  50. @ Colin

    These things happen. Angela Eagle was fired by Blair accidentally, by mistake.

    But yes, it is pretty careless.

    Mind, when you have all these posts and you don’t have people to fill them, and then you have to merge and demerge all these functions …

    I’m sure Corbyn would have an excuse. There was no response, so silence is a sign of agreement, so she was appointed, then – well, she didn’t respond, but this other one sent me something. I completely forgot about that guy, so, no harm in firing her.

    Well, really it doesn’t make any difference really in this mayhem. At least he is right on this one.

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