Following on from the ORB and ICM polls at the start of the week, there are two more EU polls today that both have small movements towards Leave. YouGov in the Times have topline figures of REMAIN 41%(+1), LEAVE 42%(+3), DK/WNV 17%(-4), while Survation for IG have topline figures of REMAIN 45%(-1), LEAVE 38%(+3), DK 17%(-2). I’m dubious about whether this is an Obama effect, but it does put to bed the idea that the series of polls last week showing a movement towards Remain was the start of some sort of breakthrough.

An interesting thing about the YouGov poll – while their headline EU voting intention figures have changed very little over the last few months, there has been movement in Remain’s favour on the economic argument. Back in February people thought Britain would be worse off outside the EU by only a two point margin, it’s now thirteen points (35% worse off, 22% better off). YouGov’s regular EU questions have also shown increasing belief that leaving the EU would be bad for jobs, and bad for people’s personal finances. Yet this hasn’t translated into any movement in the headline figures.

This may be because it’s being balanced out by factors favouring Leave, like immigration or the NHS, or it may be that the economic argument hasn’t started to bite yet. I’m reminded of the experience of Scotland, where people swung towards YES during the campaign despite telling pollsters they thought that an independent Scotland would be worse off economically… but ended up swinging in favour of risk aversion and what they thought was their best economic interest in the final fortnight. Anyway, time will tell.

Finally YouGov have voting intention figures of CON 30%, LAB 33%, LDEM 6%, UKIP 20%. That twenty percent for UKIP is a record high from YouGov, though I am a little dubious about it. While it seems perfectly feasible that during a referendum campaign the only significant political party backing one side of the argument may get a boost in support, we haven’t seen such a big boost in support echoed in any other polling. Wait to see if that’s reflected in any other polling before getting too excited.


361 Responses to “YouGov/Times – Remain 41%, Leave 42%”

1 2 3 8
  1. Better Together scare stories increased the Yes vote in Scotland just as the scare stories from the Remain team are upping the Leave vote. UK government don’t seem to have learned the lesson.

  2. It seems to me that this Referendum vote will come down to whether the instinctive and visceral dislike of the EU amongst a large swathe of the UK population will trump the lingering uncertainty about our economic prospects if we leave. These two wildly conflicting sentiments can co-exist in the same voter and this increasingly tight contest may well be determined in the end by whether the heart rules the head, or vice versa.

    Anecdotally, I’ve been surprised at just how deep and widespread is this visceral dislike of the EU, not just amongst the loony and swivel eyed Ukip fruit cake types, but amongst rational and normally moderate people too. So widespread and deeply felt is it that I believe it could trump the countervailing fear and uncertainty argument that might sway people towards sticking with the status quo. Fanned by 80% of the tabloid press, the passion of these sentiments may well mean that the Brexiteers will turn out in much larger numbers and stick to what their heart is telling them. There’s a bit of momentum gathering for them too, I detect

    A heady cocktail of xenophobia, nurtured grievances about being swindled by foreigners and fears about immigration could well swing this damned thing the Brexiteers way, I think. If it doesn’t quite, then it’s going to be very, very close. A stonking great win for Remain, Cameron’s perfect scenario, looks a distant dream now.

    Where I deposit my vote amongst all this fun and games will depend on a number of factors that are much more aligned to domestic political issues, I have to confess. The pondering, therefore, must go on a while longer yet, maybe right up to polling day. I’ll be watching the polls very closely..

    On the YouGov VI poll, that is a very low Tory figure and a very high UKIP one but I thought I saw another poll quite recently that had UKIP on 17%, so it could be that something is afoot. Maybe just an obvious and short term effect of the EU Referendum debate, but it would appear from some of these polls, and we do more to validate the speculation, that UKIP are starting to disproportionately hurt the Tories again.

    As Cameron once wisely observed, banging on about Europe is always toxic for the Tories. Will his Referendum ruse lance the boil or apply the final stake through the heart of a deeply divided party? In other words, will it unify or instead usher in the great unfinished business of British politics; the final splintering of the hitherto solid, one party, centre-right vote.

  3. A three-point lead for [Labour], eh? Admittedly it’s mainly a matter of Labour holding on to its support while the Tories’ slumps, but it’s still very much not where we were told we’d be, six months into a Corbyn leadership. Let’s see if Labour can snag some of that 20% on its way back to the Tories.

  4. There must be a potential for UKIP to take a lot of Tory votes now that Cameron has made clear he is for remain.

    I think we might be in for surprises in the local elections.

  5. I had a rather depressing conversation at a friend’s house two days ago, with a couple in their 60s who have owned a second home in France for many years. It was obvious that they dislike and distrust “the French” and consequently won’t employ French workers to do any work on the house or even cut the grass because they are sure they would be ripped off. This is despite them admitting that all the French people that live in their village seem quite charming. They have decided to vote leave, as have all the people they know and to support UKIP because Cameron is cow towing to dreadful foreigners. I was polite to them, but it was a strain.

  6. @Crossbatt – 8.39
    ‘It seems to me that this Referendum vote will come down to whether the instinctive and visceral dislike of the EU amongst a large swathe of the UK population….’

    But even I, pro-European as I am, was surprised at how strongly the Remain cause seems to be supported by people north of the Border. I think the Remain figure in yesterday’s Scottish poll was around 60%.

    Just back from Malta, where I was entertained by a Maltese taxi-driver complaining that they, the Maltese, have been forced to subsidise Greece.
    What the Brexit people seem to ignore is that the EU is not ‘us v them’ but co-operating with like minded people in other countries. Had the UK joined the Euro in the first place I doubt if the Greeks would have been allowed to get into the mess they did – or even allowed to join the Euro (the Germans still not confident about ‘dictating’ to others).

    As for RMJ1’s conversation with the couple who have a home in France, do we know whether they are fluent French speakers? If not, why not? Speaking to someone in his/her own language is a great help when it comes to employing friendly locals.
    Malta, of course, has the advantage of having English as an official language. Perhaps RMJ’s friends ought to sell up in France and move south……..

  7. Well, regardless of the explanations for Labour’s lead of 33-30, it’s a lead nonetheless….

    So, Corbyn deserves his chance to lead Labour, for now at least…talk of coups in the summer look silly and selfish right now.

  8. @ Albo Macb
    “scare stories increased the Yes vote in Scotland just as the scare stories from the Remain team are upping the Leave vote. UK government don’t seem to have learned the lesson.”

    I can see two problem with that theory:

    1. The eventual result in the Scottish referendum was right in line with the polls two months earlier.

    2. As AW says, the EU polls are not necessarily moving Leave’s way :- the evidence is pretty scant, and the opposite appeared to be the case just a week ago. The overall picture from the polls is much as it was last month, or indeed at any time over the past 6 months.

  9. Good morning all from sunny WC2

    Quite interesting figures on economic and immigration factors in the EU polls. I would agree the remain side do have the upper hand on the economic front (not suggesting they are right of course) but as stated this may be offset by peoples views on immigration and the NHS favouring leave.

    The main factor which swung it for the No side during the Scottish indy vote was pensions and the vote in the end was skewed by the over 60’s voting disproportionately in favour of No compared to the rest of the demographic.

    Its still too close to call on the EU vote but I think the leave side will be the happier side because the Obama strop appears to have had little impact and I really do think that was the Remain sides trump card.

    However on the party VI…UKIP 20% and Tories 30%, 3% behind Labour!! This may well be the Obama ramifications coming home to roost for the Tories because although it doesn’t appear to have impacted on the EU VI, (I just think the ceiling for remain and leave has been reached and everything rests on the DK) disgruntled Tory voters who are Brexiters may well have been peeved off with Cameron dragging Obama into the campaign and in turn turned to UKIP.
    ……..
    HAWTHORN
    “There must be a potential for UKIP to take a lot of Tory votes now that Cameron has made clear he is for remain.
    I think we might be in for surprises in the local elections”
    ______

    I would go along with this and Tory Brexiters may well give the Tories a bloody nose during the local elections.
    …..
    OLDNAT
    Thanks for the info on Ed Balls day. I should had hung up my sock. ;-)

  10. JOHN B

    “But even I, pro-European as I am, was surprised at how strongly the Remain cause seems to be supported by people north of the Border. I think the Remain figure in yesterday’s Scottish poll was around 60%”
    __________

    European Union Scotland STV website
    On June 23 the whole of the UK will go to the polls to decide if Britain should stay in the European Union.

    “When asked how they intend to cast their referendum vote 66% of those polled said that they would back a Remain vote, with 29% saying that they will vote to Leave the European Union in June. Only 5% said that they were still undecided”
    …………..

    The remain vote in Scotland is extremely high but hardly surprising when there is little in the way of a leave campaign in Scotland and most Scots are probably seeing the likes of IDS BJ and Farage who are not that popular in Scotland fronting the leave vote with Nicola Sturgeon Ruth Davidson and Patrick Harvey who are popular fronting the remain campaign.

  11. Michael Siva

    “Well, regardless of the explanations for Labour’s lead of 33-30, it’s a lead nonetheless….

    So, Corbyn deserves his chance to lead Labour, for now at least…talk of coups in the summer look silly and selfish right now.”

    True, but only up to a point. The current Tory Government, elected with a small majority and a weak mandate, is in deep political trouble, riven with internal divisions over Europe, education policy and welfare, and overseeing a spluttering economy where quite a few of the key indicator lights are now flashing amber and red. My underlying feeling is that if Corbyn and Labour were really cutting through, they’d be opening up some big leads opinion poll leads now. They’d certainly be scoring better than low 30s VI

    However, I do accept your basic point that Corbyn deserves time and while he could be doing better, there’s no evidence of any car crashes here. I just think he still needs to do the basics of politics better. Maybe this will come with time.

    We shall know more after the local and mayoral elections, I guess.

  12. Long time since i posted to this site and notice that many regulars are still here.

    Given the polling problems at the last election, i would think it would be even more difficult to gain a representative sample for this referedum.

    We have seen in various polling maps of the UK regarding views on the EU, that there is a vast difference between regions. I think the most anti EU parts of the UK had a prominent Brexit supporting MP, with the constituency represented by Jacob Rees Mogg being the most anti EU. Many of the large cities London, Birmingham and Manchester were mostly pro EU.

    I just wonder how seriously we can take any EU polling ? I suspect those in favour of Brexit are most likely to vote and it is for this reason, i think the polls showing any significant remain lead are wrong. Those in favour of remain as they prefer the status quo, will be a lot less likely to go out to vote, however hard David Cameron tries to get them to take the time to vote.

  13. New TNS Holyrood poll

    Party : Const VI : List VI : SV pred seats : Cutbot pred seats
    (based on those certain to vote)

    SNP : 52% : 45% : 70 : 70
    Lab : 22% : 22% : 27 : 29
    Con : 17% : 18% : 21 : 20
    Grn : ___ : 8% : 8 : 7
    L_D : 7% : 5% : 3 : 3

    When the euroref was announced, many wondered what effect the UKIP vote would have in the Holyrood campaign.

    In fact, like most polls, TNS show UKIP with less than 0.5% of the List vote.

  14. My belief (which I have been saying for some time) is that we are seeing a gradual disintegration of incumbent political party systems across Europe and their replacement with far more fragmented party systems. The UK is no exception to this.

    It just happened to Labour slightly before the Conservatives. I would not be surprised if falls in Conservative support do not translate into increases in Labour support if it is down to a disintegration of the right-wing voting bloc.

    Institutional systems or political leaders can slow the process, but the forces are too powerful to hold back. Should anyone be surprised that economic system failure is leading to political system failure?

  15. JOHN B
    I should have said that the conversation took place in France where I spend quite a bit of my time. I don’t think either of the couple speak much French and I find that to be true with most second home owners. I am not really fluent but I can hold a reasonable conversation in the language. Most of the British who actually live there are at about my level – I would guess A level+ but some find the language very hard. That does not stop them being adamant remainders if they have a vote.
    I don’t think that is really the problem. There just seems to be a substantial number of seemingly intelligent people who have a distrust of Johny foreigner, even if he does speak English.

  16. Anthony,
    Are you aware that the ICM Referendum online poll also had Voting Intention figures? Specifically they were –
    Con 33 Lab 32 UKIP 17 LD 7 Others 11

  17. @rmj1

    I don’t think this attitude is limited to the British. As a Brit who’s travelled a lot, I’ve found myself on the receiving end of anti-British / English prejudice on a couple of occasions in Europe. The way I see it, them and us is a fairly well established evolutionary instinct that presumably predates us as human beings and one that it’s pretty hard for the conscious mind to overcome. I guess it’s all based on our experience of the world and nearly all of us will have our own irrational judgements about who is ‘us’ and who is ‘them’.

  18. As some one who favours “Remain” – I was encouraged a few days ago that Labour voters will be turning out on the 23rd and voting “Remain”

    Not our of any great love for the EU, but our of hatred for the Conservative party. All they see if “Leave” win is many more years of Tory rule as the tories consolidate. But if “Remain” wins they see the tories splitting and the right in this country spending decades in the wilderness.

  19. @Graham

    “Anthony,
    Are you aware that the ICM Referendum online poll also had Voting Intention figures? Specifically they were –
    Con 33 Lab 32 UKIP 17 LD 7 Others 11”

    Thanks. I thought I’d seen a recent poll showing UKIP on 17%.

    You’ve reassured me that I’m not going completely ga-ga!

    :-)

  20. Interesting poll.

    Looking at the tables only 63% of 2015 Conservatives said they vote vote Conserrvative in a GE tomorrow, with 23% WNV and DK

    The age break own looks interesting too. Labour lead the Conservatives by 25% for 18-24 and 11% for 25-49. (Of course the small samples have a large MOE).

    50-64 has a Conservative lead over Labour of 2%, and among 65+ 19%. UKIP score 19% on both catagories.

    Again, this points to a low turn out referendum looking tight. A solid Remain win will need plenty of younger people and Labour people to get out and vote.

    Anecdotally, in the Locals I haven’t seen single Conservative board up yet. Are Conservative voters fed up, and likely to sit on their hands or vote UKIP? In truth, the locals election are a free hit to give the Government a bloody nose without too much consequence.

    It’s too far out in my view to draw any idea about 2020. I think @Hawthorn is correct though – traditional parties are flagging some what. That thin piece of elastic that drags voters back to the main parties at GEs gets ever weaker.

  21. @SRCooper

    I really wish people would vote for something based on positive reasons.

    “They say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one…(hopefully)”

  22. Crossbat11,

    “You’ve reassured me that I’m not going completely ga-ga!”

    A bit late for that surely!

    Peter.

  23. @Rich

    Spot on. And there is an argument that while a democracy can cover a population of any size, in designing a contented, non-fractious democratic system one needs to recognise this kind of “natural demos”: a group of people generally happy to accept the will of their own majority. In ignoring the de facto breaks in “then and us”, does democracy not start to lose its moral legitimacy somewhat and begin to look like a coercive tyranny of the majority?

    On the sovereignty issue with respect to the upcoming EU referendum, is that not key? As indeed it was/is in the debate on Scottish self-rule. Where do the natural dividing lines in “them and us” more naturally sit in the hivemind of the populace?

  24. Livingstone in full Godwin mode on DP. John Mann not happy !

    Can Leave really win this ?-that would be seismic.-for JC according to Tim Montgomerie; as well as for DC.

  25. What the hell is going on with the Labour party? On a day they are ahead in two polls they go and spoil it with a manifesto pledge of deporting Israel ‘s population to America.

    And as I’m writing this I’ve just glanced up at a TV screen showing some sort of confrontation between the former Labour Mayor and a Labour MP……..good day for the allotments if you’re a Labour member…them beetroot’s need plucked.

  26. @CB11 – “Anecdotally, I’ve been surprised at just how deep and widespread is this visceral dislike of the EU, not just amongst the loony and swivel eyed Ukip fruit cake types, but amongst rational and normally moderate people too…….

    A heady cocktail of xenophobia, nurtured grievances about being swindled by foreigners and fears about immigration could well swing this damned thing the Brexiteers way, I think…”

    I have to express disappointment with this type of post. Some leavers could be described in such terms, but that isn’t helpful I feel. Others have a perfectly rational and decent view of foreigners, immigration etc, but can see the extraordinary contradictions and faults within the EU, yet are lumped in with the ‘xenophobic nutters’ characterization.

    For example, a couple of days ago I posted on concerns that the EU regulations on the Macroscopic Imbalance Procedure are being willfully ignored by the Commission, which has refused to initiate action against Germany for running a huge current account surplus for the last 6 years. The regulations are mandatory, and clearly state that Germany should be fined 0.1% of GDP annually (c EU3b) until they initiate a credible plan to bring their surplus into line.

    This matters, as the result of the German surplus is mass unemployment elsewhere in the EZ, as employment now becomes the only adjustment mechanism once states share a currency but reject cross border capital flows. I’m not sure that the many benefits of EU membership are worth it, when the organisation simply ignores extremely important rules because the country breaking them is powerful.

    I similarly posted my disgust at the EU’s hurriedly negotiated deal with Turkey on the migrant crisis. Some of the measures are simply illegal under international human rights agreements – but this doesn’t stop the EU from signing up to them.

    I’m not sure that the many benefits of EU membership are worth it, when the organisation simply ignores international laws protecting the most vulnerable, just to save their political leaders skins.

    I’m wise enough to know that leaving means I may be left with a government equally willing to ignore the plight of the unemployed, or refugees and migrants, but at least I, and my fellow citizens, would have a direct line to get rid of them.

    Does this make me a loony, swivel eyed xenophobe, or can we have a better level of debate about the very many serious structural defects and practical problems within the EU?

  27. COLIN.

    “Livingstone in full Godwin mode on DP. John Mann not happy ”
    ________

    I’m going to pick up some popcorn on my way home tonight and catch the Daily Politics on the I player. Should be quite good viewing.

  28. I think the whole “debate” on Israel has become a sufficiently logic-free space that I am going to ignore it.

  29. ALLAN

    Extraordinary.

    Can’t escape the impression that KL just loves winding people up.

  30. @SRCooper – I’m with @CMJ on this. That reason for voting in the referendum is extremely poor, in my view.

    As it happens, I’m getting ever so slightly more confident in my light hearted prediction that if and when the SNP vote subsides in Scotland, enough of it could break to the Tories to enable them to snatch the alternative leadership role from an enfeebled Labour party.

    My – how I would laugh then at my Scottish friends who believed that a Yes vote would protect them forever from those nasty Tories! Even better if Labour rules Westminster when it happens!

    My advice; You have no idea what the future of politics is, so best to vote on the issue today, as best you see it.

  31. @Colin – I suspect that this is a symptom of a mind set on parts of the left that all too readily demonizes their opponents.

    Every bit as bad as the Thatcherite grabbing of the Union Flag and patriotism in the 1980’s with the notion that trade unionists etc can’t be ‘British’, is the left’s ‘Thatcher hate’ mentality, and the idea that Arab = good, downtrodden and persecuted and Israeli = fascist, powerful oppressor.

    In the case of Israel, I can’t for the life of me imagine what Ken was thinking in his justification of a particulrly stupid tweet that had already been withdrawn and apologized for, and his lack of verbal discipline has now created a huge (and fully justified) backlash in his own party. Corbyn’s reaction is now in the spotlight, a few days ahead of difficult elections, with his response now needing to go farther than was possibly justified, in order to show a serious rejection of these new comments.

    Ken has always been semi detached from his party, but I think if Labour are to have any chance in 2020, they need to strip down to team players who can keep their mouths shut while their brains work out what is required. Time for Ken to go.

  32. OK, that’s two “leave” poll leads this week out of four such polls, and 3 out of 9 in the last two weeks. But… when “remain” get a lead, it’s usually a significant one, ie 5% plus, whereas for “leave” it’s almost invariably 1-2%. I’d still put “remain” around 5% ahead at this point.

    Interestingly, in “This Week” there’s a poll quoted as saying 57% believe “remain” will win, vs 21% who believe “leave” will triumph. Maybe some of the zealots believe the vote will be rigged? I wouldn’t be surprised.

    As for the Labour lead – if there is indeed such a thing at present: I am dubious, I’m thinking whatever happens at the moment is heavily distorted by the EU referendum debate.

    An interesting question to consider is what is going to happen once the EU question is resolved: if we leave, will UKIP vanish? Or if we remain, will it rumble on?

    It seems that something resembling a government is going to be formed in Ireland. At last. Fianna Fail are now in the odd position of being in government and opposition at the same time. Obviusly hoping to avoid blame if things go badly.

  33. Labour in complete meltdown, as they now suspend Ken after his latest car crash of an interview.
    They, alas, seem to want to make things easy for Cameron.
    Big, big problems for the Reds, I fear. A deep malaise has infected the party.

  34. @Jaspar – not necessarily. Ken’s very quick suspension is a good move and shows intent. It’s a terrible story for the party, but as ever, it’s usually the reaction to such things that defines the longer term impression.

    Corbyn has at last made a start in this regard.

  35. @Alec

    “Does this make me a loony, swivel eyed xenophobe, or can we have a better level of debate about the very many serious structural defects and practical problems within the EU?”

    No it doesn’t but then again, I made no such claims either. You will see, if you re-read my post, that I said there was a surprising visceral aversion to the EU amongst people who held moderate and reasonable views. Their dislike of the organisation may well stem from very similar reasons to those you’ve mentioned yourself, but the point I was making was that these people will have strange bedfellows in the Brexit camp; people with less noble and high-minded motivations. It is these people who will be titillated and excited by the tabloid coverage of the debate and, if you don’t think that much of this is based on a dislike and mistrust of foreigners and, on the margins, quasi-racist views on immigration, we must agree to disagree, I fear.

  36. Yet more evidence for my “political disintegration” theory.

  37. COLIN
    ALLAN
    Extraordinary.
    “Can’t escape the impression that KL just loves winding people up”
    ________

    I’ve not seen the interview yet but it must had been a whopper judging by this tweet.

    Laura Kuenssberg [email protected] 21m21 minutes ago
    Livingstone suspended
    ……
    Ken Livingston….the gift that keeps on giving.

    I’m telling you I’ve quite a package to look forward to later this evening. Villarreal v Liverpool, that Daily Politics interview with Ken Livingston, Question Time with Alex Salmond on the panel and of course to finish it all off #sadmanonatrain Michael Choo-choo Portillo and his moment of the week.

  38. Crossbat11: ‘Anecdotally, I’ve been surprised at just how deep and widespread is this visceral dislike of the EU, not just amongst the loony and swivel eyed Ukip fruit cake types, but amongst rational and normally moderate people too.’

    Or it could be that Ukippers are not such loony and swivel-eyed fruit cake types after all..

    And in response to a point on another post, it is not necessary for different countries to be in a political union in order to co-operate with each other. A great deal of Australia’s foreign trade is with China and Japan, yet nobody is suggesting those countries form a political union.

  39. I think this is rogue poll I cannot see labour ahead by three points

  40. @Jaspar – not necessarily. Ken’s very quick suspension is a good move and shows intent. It’s a terrible story for the party, but as ever, it’s usually the reaction to such things that defines the longer term impression.

    Corbyn has at last made a start in this regard.

    My understanding was that previous Labour politicians who have been suspended were done so under a high degree of duress from Corbyn. Indeed, he didn’t even want to suspend a Luton councillor who said Jews had ‘big noses’. Yesterday was a glaring example of this with Naz Shah, and my guess is he only suspended Livingstone because he really had to.

    A show of intent? Hardly. A show of a man who does not understand even the basics of the position he finds himself in.

  41. So it’s a rogue poll confirming the previous rogue poll!

  42. @Crossbat11
    It is these people who will be titillated and excited by the tabloid coverage of the debate and, if you don’t think that much of this is based on a dislike and mistrust of foreigners and, on the margins, quasi-racist views on immigration, we must agree to disagree, I fear.

    Whilst I agree with a lot of what you wrote in your original post, I am increasingly seeing the increase in support for UKIP/Brexit in the terms of a general reaction to globalisation similar to what is happening with support for Trump from sections of the electorate in the US. There have been very clear losers from globalisation, and this was recognised from the start, but the ‘establishment’ (for use of a better word) did very little of practical help to those groups most impacted.

    The basic fact is that we would still have large scale immigration, a declining manufacturing sector, terrorist threats and structural unemployment if we are in or out. As the EU is part of the establishment, supported by the establishment it’s not surprising that those who are angry/disillusioned are gravitating to Leave.

  43. On the Livingston suspension, beyond given more support to the accusation that Labour is a general state of disarray, I doubt it will have any impact on votes cast next Thursday. I haven’t seen the programme yet so am not clear on what he did say, but at a cursory glance of what has been written it looks like another prime case of someone using an inappropriate historical analogy without actually understanding the history itself.

  44. BERT, where does your understanding come from?

  45. @Pete

    I take it you must have seen yesterday’s events unfold? Corbyn issuing a statement about Shah’s apology – before it was even issued? Her ‘apology’ being doctored by as yet unknown person, but probably sanctioned by Corbyn’s office, or even himself? A pathetic and wholly inadequate statement released by Corbyn hoping the issue would subside, for him to then end up suspending here anyway? I watch the news the same as everyone else, I don’t have some special insight into the machinations of the Labour party.

    Alan Sugar, however, probably does, and he described Corbyn and Livingstone as, and I quote ‘two peas from the same pod’. I could not agree more.

  46. @Redrich

    ‘On the Livingston suspension, beyond given more support to the accusation that Labour is a general state of disarray, I doubt it will have any impact on votes cast next Thursday’

    Actually, it might just do that. I’m not suggesting for one second it will change the result – Khan’s going to romp home (a disaster for London, and the wider UK, in my opinion), however, it is an important symbolic shift if it does happen.

    http://www.thejc.com/blogs/the-jc-blog/once-labour-now-zac-londons-jewish-community-could-turn-tory

  47. An interesting factoid regarding today’s date, April 28th. It was precisely six years ago that Gordon Brown called a lifelong Labour voter a ‘bigot’ for raising legitimate concerns over uncontrolled immigration.

    The Labour party have come a long way since then….

  48. You mean since Brown made the classic political mistake of speaking the truth accidentally?

  49. @Bert

    So you mean that they have moved in six years from hot water stemming from comments on uncontrolled immigration to hot water stemming from comments on controlled emigration?

  50. Possibly of more importance is this from Michael Crick –

    TORY EXPENSES: Elect Comm asks CPS & police forces to consider applying for 12-month extension to 12 month time limit on RPA prosecutions

    I hadn’t realised such an extension was possible, but it would make sense.

1 2 3 8