This morning’s Times had a new YouGov poll, full tables are here.

Topline voting intention was CON 31%, LAB 34%, LDEM 8%, UKIP 17%, GRN 3%. The poll follows a torrid few weeks for the Conservative party – a badly received budget, IDS’s resignation, the Tata steelworks and the week long fuss over David Cameron’s tax affairs. All of that has occured against the backdrop of the party arguing with itself over Europe and saying very little about any other issue. It’s always difficult to link a drop in support in the polls to specific events, but there are plenty of plausible reasons for a fall.

YouGov’s latest topline figures for the EU referendum are REMAIN 50%, LEAVE 50%. Looking at the underlying questions, there are a couple of significant movements in favour of LEAVE. Firstly on terrorism, 25% of people now think that Britain would be safer from terrorism if we left the EU (up from 16% back in February) – perhaps an impact from the Brussels terrorist attacks. Secondly trust in David Cameron on the issue of Europe has dropped sharply, from 29% to 21%. In fairness, trust in most of the leave figures (including Boris Johnson) has fallen too – the only person whose figures have increased is Jeremy Corbyn, who with 28% trust is now more trusted on Europe than Cameron.

Looking at some more general questions on the Tory leadership David Cameron’s ratings have declined there too. In December his lead over Jeremy Corbyn as best Prime Minister was twenty-six points, now it is only seven points (almost all due to Cameron’s rating falling, rather than Corbyn’s increasing) – 32% Cameron (down 17), 25% Corbyn (up 2). As with the voting intention figures, I would be cautious about jumping to conclusions about the reasons for the drop in Cameron’s ratings – while the questions were asked just after the row over his investments, in the same people people said by 45% to 35% that Cameron hadn’t actually done anything wrong. It is just as likely to be the impact from the budget, from the general running of the government or from Cameron losing the support and loyalty of Conservative voters who are backing leave. It will be interesting to see to what degree the ratings of the Conservative party and David Cameron himself recover once the referendum is finally over and they can get on with something else (assuming, of course, that Cameron’s leadership survives the aftermath)

On the subject of Cameron’s future 31% of people now think he should step down in the next year (up from 18% in December), compared to 36% who think he should stay until 2019 or later (down from 50% in December). If Britain votes to leave the European Union 44% think that Cameron should resign. In terms of a successor, Boris Johnson remains the clear favourite of the public and of Conservative voters. Support for George Osborne is now very low – he is the choice of only 4% of the public, of only 2% of Conservative voters (behind Michael Gove and Sajid Javid). Osborne even lags behind Jeremy Corbyn in a question on who would make the best Prime Minister – he will have some catching up to do to repair his reputation ahead of any leadership election.


161 Responses to “YouGov/Times – CON 31, LAB 34, LD 8, UKIP 17, GRN 3”

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  1. Many thanks Anthony
    Political weather may be on the change.

  2. Although a bad couple of weeks for the Conservatives, this only represents a two point drop since the last YouGov/Times poll this time last month. It may be that the current events with Cameron haven’t had much impact at all, but the budget and its fallout had brought about the narrowing.

    On a seperate note, there’s not many Westminster VI polls around right now; hard to see any patterns.

  3. There’s been a huge movement over the past month on GE voting intention. The overall balance has moved from a Con lead of perhaps 8 points to around level pegging since 10th March.

  4. Ah, but how long before peeps start with the models of…. swingback??!!!

  5. So a ten point YG lead to the Cons in Dec is now a 3 point Lab lead.

    At this rate by the next election Jez will have all the seats in Parliament (except Scottish ones, of course)

  6. Surprising that Osborne is even more unpopular amongst Tory voters than the public at large. UKIP still on a pretty high percentage (for them). It will be interesting to see what happens to their vote after the referendum. If Remain wins, it’s possible that UKIP support will dissipate, and then the question is who will those voters move to?

  7. Good evening all….what a result for The Reds YNWA

    Onto the political reds and and blues..

    “The poll follows a torrid few weeks for the Conservative party – a badly received budget, IDS’s resignation, the Tata steelworks and the week long fuss over David Cameron’s tax affairs. All of that has occured against the backdrop of the party arguing with itself over Europe and saying very little about any other issue. It’s always difficult to link a drop in support in the polls to specific events, but there are plenty of plausible reasons for a fall”
    _____

    So basically for the Tories the polls are exposing a multitude of sins. DC’s own ratings are horrific and he is beginning to become toxic for the party

    Tory party strategists are probably having sleepless nights.
    To be fair to DC on the Panama stuff, he hasn’t done anything wrong and the amount of money that was given to him from his father is a lot to most of us but it was hardly millions of pounds and peanuts compared to some of the obscene payouts company bosses are receiving.

    YouGov’s latest topline figures for the EU referendum are REMAIN 50%, LEAVE 50%

    With ole Corby’s intervention backing remain it could be counter-productive and move some Tory DK’s over to leave or it might be a boost and encourage some Labour DK’s to back remain.

    WE JUST DON’T KNOW!!

  8. Dameron hasn’t done anything wrong on Panama?

    Bit odd about that voting intention poll, then. Not that we can trust polls.

  9. NICKP
    “So a ten point YG lead to the Cons in Dec is now a 3 point Lab lead.
    At this rate by the next election Jez will have all the seats in Parliament (except Scottish ones, of course)”
    ______________

    Is that because the Scots would had bolted by then or are you suggesting the SNP will still be sending bus loads of peeps to Westminster? :-)

  10. #will have bolted

  11. NICKP

    He made a hash of explaining himself but as far as I know he hasn’t done anything illegal but that said the whole way he went about the Panama stuff was wrong.

    He’s a dead man walking.

  12. Pretty low trust in politicians on EU membership all round. Perhaps this is reflective of the fact that undecideds are frustrated by the claim-versus-counterclaim nature of the debate so far, all spin and speculation, with no firm truths. Even the BBC, with its admirable “reality check” agenda, mostly descends into “Inners say this. Brexiters disagree.”

  13. Nick P

    “At this rate by the next election Jez will have all the seats in Parliament (except Scottish ones, of course)

    He might have a few problems in Northern Ireland too. :-)

  14. “Surprising that Osborne is even more unpopular amongst Tory voters than the public at large.”

    So are we saying that Tory voters really don’t like the public at large?

  15. Pete B

    ” If Remain wins, it’s possible that UKIP support will dissipate”

    It’s possible – but it was also seen as possible that the SNP would disappear with a No vote. Could go either way for UKIP (or make no difference at all!)

  16. Alec
    ok, should have said “than WITH the public at large.”

  17. Right, answers on a postcard. On QT the panellists are being asked, on a scale of one to ten, how genuine Jeremy Corbyn’s support for the European Union is.

    I’m going to give him a six out of ten. I think he gets some points for admitting, much like most voters but unlike most politicians, that he is conflicted and can see both sides of the argument. Compare Boris Johnson, for example, who since his “tortured soul-searching” over which side to back, hasn’t once started a sentence: “Although the EU has a lot going for it…”

  18. POLLTROLL:
    ‘mostly descends into “Inners say this. Brexiters disagree.”’

    To be fair that’s only been half the campaign so far. The other half has been:
    ‘Brexiteers say this. Other Brexiteers disagree’

    Interesting that Arron Banks has stopped throwing toys out of the pram though. Perhaps that gives the green light for Vote Leave to absorb the toxic poison that is Ukip and be found dead in a political ditch on June 24th.

  19. @Polltroll – yes, I rather admire the somewhat more honest approach he has taken. Cameron pretended to be very Euro sceptic to get his MPs to elect him as leader, continued this pretense right up until he secure ‘a deal’ and now can’t find anything wrong with the EU.

    Boris endured a tortured three days of soul searching, before deciding that, in fact, the EU is completely useless. Corbyn, but contrast, had serious doubts, still has them, but apparently believes we have a better chance to address these in rather than out.

    All three have faults in their logic, but only one sounds believable to me.

  20. Support for George Osborne is now very low – he is the choice of only 4% of the public, of only 2% of Conservative voters (behind Michael Gove and Sajid Javid).

    No it isn’t. Osborne’s support is dropping and has never been that solid among the general public (Corbyn was beating him in some polls last year), but p 17 of the tables show him on 12%. I put the question and percentages up on a previous thread

    Imagine there was a leadership contest in the Conservative party and these were the candidates. Imagining that you had a vote in the contest, who would you vote for?

    Boris Johnson 25% (56) [51]

    Theresa May 8% (18) [20]

    George Osborne 4% (9) [17]

    Michael Gove 4% (9) [9]

    Sajid Javid 2% (4) [1]

    Nicky Morgan 1% (2) [1]

    Would not vote 30% (-) [-]

    Don’t know 25% (-) [-]

    () excluding DK/WNV
    [] current Con voters excluding DK/WNV.

    Osborne usually does better among Conservatives than generally and in particular he does much better with members, so Pete B was right to query.

    Johnson is clearly still the favourite, but slightly less so among Conservative voters. In part this is because UKIP voters are most heavily for him, presumably because of his support for Brexit (Gove also benefits from this). Whether the UKIP fans would switch their votes is another matter of course. Despite the predictions UKIP’s vote has proved very solid even before its current boost from the EU campaigning.

  21. I think sad man on a train Michael choo choo choo choo Portillo has been reading one of my comments where I described David Cameron’s little leaflet as being “miserable” a few days back as he has just called it that..”miserable” on This Week.

    Anyway #sadmanonatrain can dream of shiny new pendolino trains criss-crossing his bed covers, I’m off to mine to dream of Liverpool and Celtic success.

  22. I sent my booklet back with succinct remarks written all over it.

  23. A bit more on the popularity of the various leadership contenders among Conservatives. YouGov did a poll of members about eight weeks ago (f/w 5-20 Feb):

    https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/681loa3q0n/InternalResults_ToryPoll1_W.pdf

    So it was pre-Budget, EU campaign (mostly) and Panama. They also asked:

    Imagine there was a leadership contest in the Conservative party and these were the candidates. Imagining that you had a vote in the contest, who would you vote for?

    Boris Johnson 38% (+7)

    Theresa May 21% (+4)

    George Osborne 20% (-13)

    Sajid Javid 11% (+2)

    Nicky Morgan 1% (n/a)

    Would not vote 1% (-1)

    Don’t know 7
    % (-1)

    Figures in brackets are previous members’ poll (f/w 10-17 Sep)
    ht tps://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/sb6ms6gh7x/Conservative_Leadership_Website.pdf

    So it’s interesting that in February, before the events that were supposed to be be what caused the Tory slide, Osborne’s ratings had already slipped badly.

    The February poll also tested various head-to-heads (which after all is what the Conservative members will actually be faced with). Johnson beat Osborne 55-36 and would have presumably beaten the others as well[1]. Osborne only just beats May 46-45, though he defeats the others more strongly.

    So it looks like Boris’s to lose, but it’s clear that there are a lot of members uneasy with the prospect of him and it may not be the coronation that the media seem to expect. Another candidate could well disrupt everything – who foresaw Corbyn? And on this poll he does not better against Corbyn than Cameron does,

    [1] Presumably YouGov went on the previous survey, which Osborne led among the members, when question setting. But it would be interesting to see how close it is with May.

  24. Allan will be pleased that the public agree with him and Mr Choo-Choo. In the latest poll (p 15/16), YouGov asked:

    This week the government are sending out a government funded booklet setting out their view in favour of remaining in the European Union. Do you think it is right or wrong for the government to send out this booklet?

    Right 29%

    Wrong 49%

    Don’t know 22%

    As you would expect those wanting Leave were massively against (77-11) but the Remains weren’t as enthusiastic for the booklet enough (54-28) to counterbalance that in this evenly split poll. More worryingly the DK and ‘Swing Voters’ were definitely against 40-21 and 41-27).

    Notably, while the current split in the other Parties was similar to those who voted for them in 2015, while current Conservatives are 43-42 in favour, those who voted in May were opposed 47-35. So we may have found one reason why these 2015 voters are being lost.

  25. Latest odds at Ladbrokes for next ge for most seats Cons 1-3 odds on labour 5-2. So guys plenty of you posting here positive stuff about labour you can more than double your money if you take these prices! What fools the bookies are…..

  26. Thanks AW for your usual sensible summary. Not a good poll for the Tories by any stretch of the imagination, but would you expect them to be polling well at the moment?

    Nostra – you beat me to it,

    I was about to give my first forecast for the 2020 election. A Tory majority with an increase in their majority of between 10 and 20 seats.

  27. A beneficial Poll for Cons. Should make them improve their game. DC can do that- after & if he wins the Referendum.

    If he loses it all the political chips are in the air.

  28. I am quite surprised at myself for not yet having come to a decision about the referendum. I’m not normally short of an opinion about anything, but my equivocal views basically haven’t shifted for the last year.

  29. Colin,

    “A beneficial Poll for Cons.”

    Yeah, and Dunkirk was just the wake up call Britain needed!

    Labour’s rise to overtake the Tories seems to have had little effect in Scotland…..a far away land of which we know little.

    Peter.

  30. PETER CAIRNS

    Dunkirk May 1940
    End WW11 Sept 1945

    Timescale a little too long as a metaphor for now-but it will do if you like.

    re @”a far away land of which we know little.”

    I would say most of “us” know more than a little about Scotland-you really must curb the SNP instinct for reticence & diffidence.

    I think a more appropriate phrase would be :

    “a far away land of which we care little.”

  31. NEILA

    Me too- but where does one find informative , objective debate?

    Watching interviews on TV this morning, I make a plea to the TV stations -set up a debate between Darling & Gisela Stuart & do all of us equivocators favour

  32. @ TOH

    You’ve got to predict the EU referendum before you can go predicting 2020.

    I’m surprised the lack of predictions/discussion on here about the result of the referendum- is it just because no-one has a clue?

  33. PETER CAIRNS:
    “Dunkirk was just the wake up call Britain needed!”

    Or perhaps this is the Tories’ Stalingrad ;)

    SHEVII:
    “is it just because no-one has a clue?”

    We are in uncharted waters. My prediction is that Remain will win a surpriginly comfortable victory, but the range of likely scenarios definitely straddles the 50-50 mark, meaning a Leave victory would not be a big surprise. A shock, yes, but not a surprise.

  34. COLIN………My instinct leads me to Brexit, it somehow seems fresher and more ambitious, however, my fear would be the low calibre of our representatives at the exit negotiations. We would send, naive, institutionalised, career civil servants,their natural game being a sort of non-confrontational, low-key, subservience, too ready to accept the reasonable argument. What we need are hard-nosed, un-reasonable, ambitious, representatives, who see Britain’s role as a dynamic, independent Nation State, rather than a second fiddle player to the German / French self interest power base. Nick Robinson’s programme on Europe, showed the weak, masochistic, tendency in full dramatic flow, embarrassing and pathetic, as they acquiesced to their, ‘ superior ‘ European counterparts, they were,’ played’ like sick fish.
    Were we to vote out, my view is that our negotiators would bring us the worst possible deal, it’s in their nature. :-)

  35. Just for clarification, my comment about a country far away wasn’t meant to imply that people, especially here, didn’t understand let alone not care about what is happening in Scotland but rather that the Party politics of the U.K. and Scotland show little sign of aligning.

    Prior to Devolution Scots voted at Westminster largely like the rest of the U.K.
    In the first decade after Devolution they gradually moved to voting differently for Westminster and Holyrood and mow we seem to vote differently in both.

    I wonder if it is just the normal long term swings back and forth of voter support or something more perminantly. If it is long term than gradual differentiation between North & South of the border could see Independence with a whimper more than a bang.

    On Stalingrad; are the Tories the Germans or the Russians?

    Peter.

  36. Colin
    “A beneficial Poll for Cons. Should make them improve their game. DC can do that- after & if he wins the Referendum.”

    My sentiments too.

    Nostra
    Bookies are rarely fools although they will get a big hit if Leicester win the Premiership. They were offering 5000-1 at one time. There will be one or two fans who will have punted a tenner at those odds.

  37. @ Alec

    Quite right…Corbyn’s stance is the only believeable one, out of his views, and those of Boris and Cameron. Corbyn is reflecting what a lot of us feel…we don’t quite like the EU, but we will reluctantly stick with it, and try to change it from within. The EU has done a lot to erode workers’ rights, but the Tories have done even more! Leaving won’t improve the Socialist case, but probably make it worse….

    Those are what I pick up from Corbyn’s views, and it’s one shared by a lot of people I know.

    Interesting to see that a Labour party led by Corbyn is now leading the Tories 34-31. Granted, this is early days yet, but it’s clearly a sign that Corbyn deserves his chance to lead Labour into the next General Election in 2020. The Blairites and their constant muttering about coups in the summer now don’t have a leg to stand on. If they’re that unhappy about the Labour Party reconnecting with their Socialist roots, then the Blairites should cross the floor and join the Tories, with whom they have more in common….

  38. @ Allan

    “Good evening all….what a result for The Reds YNWA”

    And congrats to them…a comeback I never thought possible, and 1-3 down. I’d told my wife to switch off the telly, because Dortmund had won.

    As an Arsenal fan, it hurt me a lot to give that grudging praise….

    Cameron’s successor might find himself 1-3 down after June 23, with a lot of ground to catch up on Corbyn, if this Tory infighting continues. Today is the official EU referendum campaign launch. All this blood-letting was BEFORE

  39. “Interesting to see that a Labour party led by Corbyn is now leading the Tories 34-31. Granted, this is early days yet, but it’s clearly a sign that Corbyn deserves his chance to lead Labour into the next General Election in 2020. The Blairites and their constant muttering about coups in the summer now don’t have a leg to stand on. If they’re that unhappy about the Labour Party reconnecting with their Socialist roots, then the Blairites should cross the floor and join the Tories, with whom they have more in common….”

    ———–

    We are seeing a political dividend for voting Corbyn: they’re better-placed to hammer away at the injustice meme.

    Peeps keep saying the tax stuff was legal etc. but missing the point. It’s the contrast with the treatment of others like the disabled.

    The willingness to fight for the interests of the wealthy while for others it’s just “tough”. Put the two together and it becomes v. difficult to defend.

    This is what lies behind resignations of Montgomerie from the party, IDS from government etc.

    Whether that dividend is enough to see them secure electoral success etc. is summat else, given splits in the vote etc…

  40. Ken
    A bit like the negotiators who gave away our fishing industry and trading relationships with the Commonwealth in 1970 then?
    I also saw the Nick Robinson programme. I never liked Heath and after learning of the lies and untruths he told and the skulduggery going on in Parliament at the time, it makes me extremely angry. But then why am I surprised these are politicians. We were sold a common market and bought an over bloated, undemocratic, overbearing bureaucracy run for the benefit of an overpaid, unrepresentative ruling liberal elite.

    Cameron was at it pretending that he would go for Brexit if the eu didn’t give him what he wanted. Now we Corbyn pretending he is in favour of staying in, despite his honestly held beliefs of the last 50 years. To them it is just a game to play, when what the people want is some straightforward honesty. On the Daily Politics programme I lose count of the number of times Andrew Neil says to a waffling politico, “But that wasn’t the question I asked, please answer the question I asked”. And they never do.

  41. “What we need are hard-nosed, un-reasonable, ambitious, representatives, who see Britain’s role as a dynamic, independent Nation State, rather than a second fiddle player to the German / French self interest power base.”

    ————

    Well I suppose Scotties could offer to send Salmond. He’s a bit more used to that perspective…

  42. “Cameron’s successor might find himself 1-3 down after June 23, with a lot of ground to catch up on Corbyn, if this Tory infighting continues.”

    ———–

    So if we vote to remain, to the Tory Brexiters just go “OK, fair enough, that’s it then” and give Dave no more jip?

    How much does it lance the boil?

  43. ” We were sold a common market and bought an over bloated, undemocratic, overbearing bureaucracy run for the benefit of an overpaid, unrepresentative ruling liberal elite.”

    Polemic rubbish.

    No Government can bind the next!

    Each and every step from the Common Market we joined in the 70’s to the EU we are in now forty years later, has been discussed and debated at length by every Government, Parliament, Parlimentary Session , Formal House of Commons debate, Commons Committee and MP at the time.

    Each and every one democratically elected and given the power to make decisions on our behalf by the public. You are free to dislike those decisions but saying we have been sold out or conned is nonsense.

    I am of course assuming you know how a Representative Democracy works and as a Clue it isn’t only working when it is giveing you personally the result you want!

    It’s like the Teas Party going on about adhering to the Constituion and it being absolute even though it’s been amended more that two dozen times and the people legislating today have a mandate to make laws from the public today where millions participate freely rather than a few dozen men two centuries ago.

    Calling those people freely elected by the peoples of Europe “unrepresentative” is equally foolish, by definition as elected Parlimentarians from Soverign participatory representative democracies they as as close as you can get to the people the public want…the public chose them.

    Typical of the Brexit Brigade, acting like Basi Fawlty when his can breaks down, not his fault for buying a cheap old car or not getting it serviced…it’s the cars fault and your going to give it a damned good thrashing!!!!

    Peter.

  44. So, Cameron’s losing the Ugly Contest now! After years of being flattered by his comparison to unpopular Labour leaders like Brown , Miliband and, up to now, Corbyn, his consistently underwhelming personal ratings were mostly hidden by these favourable comparisons. Taken on their own, they revealed a leader, even at the best of times, note widely liked or respected and now things are slipping, as they inevitably will for a leader who has been in place for over a decade, he quickly finds himself in the relegation zone, vying with the Corbyn’s of this world. He never had much public affection in the bank to draw upon and I get the sense that he’s looking an increasingly diminished political figure now. The right wing press attack dogs are on his case too.

    I detect some surprising (manufactured?) insouciance amongst the Tory tribe too and while it’s way to soon to be predicting 2020 general election results, this quick polling turnaround suggests some volatility and an enduring vulnerability and weakness in the Tory brand; a brand that hits 36-37% at best now, even in politically propitious times.

    Encouragement for their many political foes methinks.

    Early days though.

    :-)

  45. ROBERT NEWARK……..A recent example of our bureaucrats in action is the gift of the Olympic stadium to West Ham, a couple of street-wise adult entertainment tycoons negotiated an almost Putin scale transfer of public assets, the contract, put into the public domaine this week, shows a level of incompetence that is breathtaking. I just hope, if we achieve Brexit, that no-one expects a deal that doesn’t compromise our future in order to appease our bullying current partners.

  46. @ Michael

    ‘Cameron’s successor might find himself 1-3 down after June 23, with a lot of ground to catch up on Corbyn’

    Michael, I do really think you’re getting carried away with a couple of opinion polls. I know it’s easy to project what you wish to happen, or what you think should happen, but has there really been any fundamental shift in the public’s perception of Corbyn?

    I must have said it a million times, but opinion polls are snapshots of the mood of the day. They are not predictors of general elections. I simply refer you to Mr Miliband and the previous five years worth of polling, Labour’s consistent poll leads throughout much of that time, and the actual general election result. Indeed, Labour were polling in the mid FORTIES at one time, and crashed to 31% in the real thing.

    Granted, if Labour start pushing 38-40% on a regular basis, and Mr Corbyn suddenly becomes the darling of Middle England, and his leadership percentages and suitability to become PM ratings go into a consistent lead over whoever the Tory leader is, and the SNP’s support collapses in favour of Labour, then yes, something may be afoot.

    But honestly, 34% after six years in opposition, after the government’s worst month since 2010, (and certainly Cameron’s worst period), is, putting it as politely as I can, underwhelming.

  47. Ken

    Isn’t that example simply one of blatant bias by Cameron in support of his favourite football team? :-)

  48. Good afternoon all from Central London.

    ROGER MEXICO

    Thanks for the info on the EU leaflet…
    …………
    Allan will be pleased that the public agree with him and Mr Choo-Choo. In the latest poll (p 15/16), YouGov asked:

    “This week the government are sending out a government funded booklet setting out their view in favour of remaining in the European Union. Do you think it is right or wrong for the government to send out this booklet?”
    Right 29%
    Wrong 49%
    Don’t know 22%
    …………….
    “Notably, while the current split in the other Parties was similar to those who voted for them in 2015, while current Conservatives are 43-42 in favour, those who voted in May were opposed 47-35. So we may have found one reason why these 2015 voters are being lost.”
    __________

    I’m extremely pleased the public agree with me and Mr Choo Choo and hopefully when the leaflets hit the doormats people will either bin it or at least do a little research into what the other side have to say.

    Very interesting on the 2015 voters and why they may have been lost. I always said the EU leaflet could be counter-productive for the Tory VI

  49. “On Stalingrad; are the Tories the Germans”

    In my analogy, they are the Germans, of course! They were strident but they are now in retreat. And probably slightly more evil than the people they have been attacking. (But that’s just my personal view (but it’s right)).

  50. MICHAEL SIVA
    @ Allan
    “Good evening all….what a result for The Reds YNWA”

    “And congrats to them…a comeback I never thought possible, and 1-3 down. I’d told my wife to switch off the telly, because Dortmund had won.”

    “As an Arsenal fan, it hurt me a lot to give that grudging praise….
    Cameron’s successor might find himself 1-3 down after June 23, with a lot of ground to catch up on Corbyn, if this Tory infighting continues. Today is the official EU referendum campaign launch. All this blood-letting was BEFORE”
    _______

    It was quite a comeback but I always knew they would pull the match back….honest!! ;-) however you being an Arsenal I fell your pain. ;-)

    Cameron’s next successor will inherit a party split down the middle after the EU vote. The good news for them is that they have 4 years to pull together and find a new leader so I don’t think the latest opinion poll will trouble them that much as it’s only stating the obvious in that the Tories in real time have issues but shouldn’t be a barometer for 2020.

    That said….as with the Scottish referendum one party sunk into the abyss and another went into the stratosphere so it will be interesting to see what happens after the EU vote with regards to the Tories and UKIP. Like I said before, they still have 4 years to pull together and luckily for the Tories the next GE is yonks away.

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