YouGov have published new polls in both Scotland and Wales in the last couple of days. Taking Wales first, topline voting intention figures for the Welsh Assembly are CON 19%(-3), LAB 35%(+1), LDEM 6%(nc), UKIP 17%(+2), Plaid 21%(nc) for the constituency vote and CON 20%(-2), LAB 31%(nc), LDEM 5%(nc), UKIP 16%(+2), Plaid 20%(-2) for the regional vote. The Conservatives are down a little, reflecting their drop in the national polls. Roger Scully’s detailled write up is here and the tabs are here.

The YouGov Scottish poll for the Times has topline figures of SNP 50%(+1), LAB 21%(+2), CON 18%(-1), LDEM 5%(-1) for the constituency vote, and SNP 45%(+2), LAB 19%(+2), CON 18%(-1), GRN 8%(nc), LDEM 5%(nc) in the regional vote. The last couple of YouGov Scottish polls had the Conservatives ahead of Labour on one vote or the other. Today’s poll had Labour back ahead, though they are still extremely close (closer than in most other Scottish polls). The rest of the poll had various questions on leadership, particularly on whether people think Ruth Davidson or Kezia Dugdale would make a better leader of the opposition – Ruth Davidson polled better, but her comparatively positive personal ratings are clearly not translating into much support for the Scottish Tories. Full tabs are here.

Finally today we got ICM’s weekly EU referendum tracker, with topline figures of REMAIN 42%, LEAVE 45%. Full tabs are here


178 Responses to “YouGov Scottish and Welsh polls”

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  1. Allan Christie

    “Parliament is going to debate the petition you signed – “STOP CAMERON spending British taxpayers’ money on Pro-EU Referendum leaflets”.

    And they sent me a nice little email thanking me for my contribution as well!

    :-)

  2. @Louis

    Well I was enjoying reading peeps views. It’s hard to relate to polling till they’ve done some polling on the matter. Discussion often initially precedes polling because polling with required fieldwork etc. tends to lag behind the event.

    Unless… we know the event is gonna happen, e.g. the EU ref., or political scandals. Polling companies were a bit remiss in not already having some polling on the dominatrix thing…

  3. Carfrew

    Surely you are being unfair, criticising pollsters for not polling on future events?

    This very day, YouGov have published a poll – “The following is a list of things that may or may not happen in the next 40 years. Please say how likely you think it is that each will happen.”

    The youngsters amongst UKPR posters can come back in 40 years time and discuss the poll.

  4. Problem with eliminating the deficit is that the economy is not like a household budget and running a deficit puts more money into the private sector to assist growth. Whereas running a surplus takes money from the private sector, restricting growth.

    Would be good to have a poling question on this, see how many peeps are aware, but there’s been the odd polling question to suggest even some polling peeps might not be aware of the household budget issue.

  5. @oldnat

    no, I acknowledged they do poll on future events, and suggested one, the EU.

    i was just saying they missed an obvious one with the dominatrix thing…

  6. Problem with peddling the aspiration meme, is that if the aspiration is to advantage some offspring over others, e.g. over the offspring of paramedics struggling to survive on their wage in London, then this might have issues in polling.

    Also, by stoking house prices differentially, e.g. with QE favouring the south, this gives a windfall inheritance advantage to some.

    The “working hard” meme is bogus… as already pointed out, some peeps get wealthy, without working hard, or even doing summat worthwhile.

    Others work hard and do worthwhile stuff but aren’t paid that much, e.g. paramedics struggling to make ends meet in London.

  7. On topic

    One insight we get from the voting system for the Senedd and Holyrood, is any willingness to support different parties with different votes.

    The constituency vote need not be the “primary” party that people support. For example those voting SNP for the constituency and SGP on the list will include Greens who don’t have an SGP candidate in their constituency, as well as SNP folk who want to see a group of Green MSPs to push the SNP on matters like Land Reform.

    List VI by constituency VI of main parties

    Wales
    Con – Con 85% : Lab 3% : PC 5% : UKIP 5% : LD 1% : Abolish Welsh Assembly 2%
    Lab – Lab 81% : Con 1% : PC 12% : UKIP 1% : LD 1% : Green 3% : Other 1%
    PC – PC 90% : Lab 4% : Con 1% : Green 3% : BNP 2%
    UKIP – UKIP 85% : Con 5% : Lab 1% : PC 3% : Xtian 2% : LD 1% : Abolish Welsh Assembly 4%

    Scotland – own side of constitutional debate in italics
    Con – Con 93% : Lab 3% : LD 3% : UKIP 1% : SNP 1% : SGP 2%
    Lab – Lab 88% : Con 4% : LD 3% : UKIP 1% : SNP 2% : SGP 2%
    SNP – SNP 89% :SGP 6% : RISE 1% : Lab 2%

  8. TOH:
    Whatever your intention was when you started typing, your post was full of partisan judgements. It’s fine, you aren’t the only one, but you then try to specifically deny it, which was hilarious.

    You even used the TLA “IMO”. Re-read what you said. If you can’t see it is partisan then there’s little hope for anyone ever having any kind of discussion with you.

  9. ALUN009

    I stand by what I said. The use of IMO does not imply that i was being partisan only that I had an opinion.

    I am sure I have had this conversation before. If you don’t like my posts don’t read them. I have no desire to upset you.

  10. Carfrew

    “The “working hard” meme is bogus… as already pointed out, some peeps get wealthy, without working hard, or even doing summat worthwhile.”

    From a polling point of view it’s what voters believe on a particular line of argument, not whether it’s bogus or not. (Not getting into that argument again. :-))

  11. Some people like being upset though…

  12. @ToH

    From a rati-onal point of view, clearly bogus. Because there are people who don’t work hard who are wealthy. Including some who inherit wealth.

    Polling simply shows how many are ok with this…

  13. (and equally there are some who work hard doing valuable stuff but don’t get wealthy etc.)

  14. It would be good to have polling to see how many fall for the aspiration meme that gets pushed…

  15. JAMES E

    “But you’ve said repeatedly that you don’t know how the threshold works and can’t be bothered to find out”
    _____

    Where did I write that I don’t understand how the threshold works?

    I do know how it works and yes I could not be bothered to look for the exact threshold because (I wasn’t that for off with my guess) and regardless of the amount of tax paid for a £400k home, it’s the whole principle of the tax I’m against as many others are too.

    Please stop the patronising and trying scribbling down tripe that I clearly did not write .

    I seriously think some posters suffer from Selective amnesia!!

  16. THE OTHER HOWARD
    Allan Christie
    “Parliament is going to debate the petition you signed – “STOP CAMERON spending British taxpayers’ money on Pro-EU Referendum leaflets”.

    And they sent me a nice little email thanking me for my contribution as well!
    :-)
    _________________

    Fantastic :-) :-)

  17. Carfrew –

    Closest that comes to mind is on page 7 here:

    http://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/swc9cwenua/YG-Archive-Pol-Sunday-Times-results-070613.pdf

    asking if people think anyone who works hard and puts the effort in can rise to the top, or if success in Britain is mostly reserved for those with a privileged background

  18. From AW link

    Which of the following best reflects your view
    of Britain today?
    Anyone with talent who is willing to work hard and
    put the effort in can have a successful career and
    rise to the top, regardless of their background……..all.38% Tory 71% Lab 24%

    Success in Britain today is mostly reserved for
    those from privileged backgrounds who know the
    right people, talented people from poor
    backgrounds don’t have a chance…………………..all 43% Tory 24% Lab 59%

    Neither ……….15%
    Don’t know……5%

    Quite interesting but I personally know quite a lot of people who are doing very well and come from ordinary working class backgrounds but I think it’s fair to say that if you do come from a wealthy background then your career prospects are enhanced but that shouldn’t stop the rest of us from wanting to be successful or ambitious.

  19. Oldnat

    I’m interested in how people take advantage of the mixed electoral systems in Scotland and Wales, but perhaps what’s striking about the data you posted is the lack of split voting, particularly in the case of SNP constituency voters.

    There’s little evidence of concern about overweening influence of SNP – I wonder how much longer that will last? I can understand that nationalists would want to send a good, solid block of nationalists to Westminster, but when it comes to the Scottish parliament I’d have thought other, domestic issues would come into play.

    Do you think the massive SNP vote in the Scottish parliament is because nationalists are hoping for a second indyref within the lifetime of the next parliament?

  20. AW

    I am sure Carfrew is grateful for that’ I certainly am. Interesting how close the polling is on the subjects of talented people and mobility are. Would be very interesting to see it repeated now or better still in 12 months time.

  21. Actually just on this ambition stuff….

    I would like to see a Forbes top 100 list of “British born” entrepreneurs and see exactly what background they come from.

    I’ve got train to catch..

  22. @AW

    Thanks muchly for that link.

    So overall we can see more peeps think the deck is stacked against than not.

    Interesting looking at the age breakdown though. Because you’d expect oldies, esp. in the South benefiting from economy boosted by QE and hiked housing prices to think their aspiration is serving them very well thank you very much!!

    In the survey I cited recently, young peeps seemed rather down on the idea of talent and effort winning out, and their life chances.

    Here, oldies still think effort etc. wins out more than the young, but the effect isn’t as marked.

    And with social mobility, more young people think it’s improving.

    Which needs further analysis, as Kasparov might say…

  23. Admittedly, the age breakdown isn’t exact. The 18 – 24 group includes some millenials and only some of the Gen Zs that the other survey focused on. Still, interesting to compare to the retirees etc.

    I wonder if the elders may change views as they see effects on grandkids…

  24. Sorbus

    I’ll do my best to answer your questions on the basis of polling evidence, where I can. :-)

    In the first couple of elections for Holyrood, parties and voters “experimented” with how to best use their List vote – notably resulting in the “Rainbow Parliament” of 2003.

    Since then there has been a reduction in “split-ticket” voting.

    Other than from the “usual suspects”, you are right that “there’s little evidence of concern about overweening influence of SNP”. But why should there be?

    Is there much evidence of concern in England that their only Parliament has more “overweening influence” of the Tories – elected on a much smaller % of the vote than the last SNP government was?

    There is no evidence that Scots prefer minority to majority government – though it’s nice to be able to slap a party down a bit, without necessarily letting the other lot in!

    Remember that the Scottish Social Attitudes Survey showed 73% of Scots trusted the Scottish government as opposed to 26% trusting the UK government (parties weren’t asked about, but it would have influenced responses).

    At some point, the SNP will lose their reputation for competence (probably when they become too incompetent! :-) ) Whether any other alliance of parties will be strong enough to replace them, or whether SNP would become a minority government needing the support of someone like the Greens – who knows?

    Polling has shown that, generally, only Tory supporters are very dissatisfied with the performance of the SNP on the economy, health, education, justice – with a mixed response from Lab supporters.

    Only the Tories take a rather different policy agenda on these matters than the other parties, and there seems to be little support for copying England and introducing fees for prescription or university tuition.

    We’ll have to wait and see whether the different policies on income tax shift the polls. Personally, I doubt that many Scots will vote for the more radical plans to increase personal taxation – yet. That may change once we see how the devolved tax regime beds in, and could be the major issue in 2021.

    The constitutional issue remains the main fault line in Scottish politics.

    Are “nationalists ..hoping for a second indyref within the lifetime of the next parliament?” Undoubtedly, some are – especially those on the Left. The majority, however, are more concerned to ensure that the next referendum isn’t lost.

    If that is delayed (and barring unforeseen circumstances, it will be) until after 2021, then that is widely seen (in the SNP) as being the better option, if it is likely to produce a win.

    For voters who want to see Scottish independence (and many would not describe themselves as nationalists) the important thing is to have a Parliament that would have a majority of pro-indy MSPs (regardless of party).

    For pro-indy parties, that is a shared objective – but they all want to maximise their share of that majority!

  25. So it looks like the May elections may be a relief for both main parties in England and Wales, and a relief for Labour in Scotland.

    In England and Wales, Labour had been looking at the prospect of an insipid showing which, because of the previous elections for the same seats, would look like a retreat. The twists of fortune have left them in a position where they can probably present themselves as having “won”. The Tories seem to have lost some support, but so far it doesn’t look especially catastrophic and they may be able to claim, without looking silly, that they’ve weathered the storm. Some will probably claim that it’s in their strategic interests that Labour does well in the elections, in order to keep Corbyn in post (I’m agnostic about this – be careful what you wish for).

    In Scotland, the only real news was ever going to be about second place. I don’t personally think it was ever likely that the Tories would pip Labour anyway, but now it’s off the cards completely, so however bad the beating by the SNP, the Labour talking heads will be all about “everyone said the Tories would overtake us when in fact they’ve had a terrible night and we’re still the only alternative to the SNP” etc.

    My own city will be interesting. Plymouth is a longstanding bellwether and tends to swing heavily one way or the other. The expectation has been that the Tories will once again take over from Labour, for which they need only modest gains. However the new Tory leader, although a lovely man, is fairly quiet and unassuming, and the combination of recent Bad News Stories and the proximity to the EU referendum may sap Tory strength. Set against that, the unexpected victory of Johnny Mercer in Moor View last year has increased recruitment and morale in the party. On balance I’d still expect the Tories to pick up a couple of wards and just about squeak into power.

  26. Neil A,

    Not so fast, I just put this poll into ScotlandVotes and got the following;

    SNP: 71 Seats, Labour: 23 Seats, Tory: 24 seats, Green: 8 Seats, LibDem 3 Seats and UKIP: 0 Seats!

    Depending on where and how the Labour and Tory votes are distributed it could go either way!

    http://www.scotlandvotes.com

    Peter.

  27. Peter @ Neil A

    Yes. The two predictor sites – Scotland Votes and Cutbot come up with different parties in 2nd place.

    Seems clear that SLab will get more votes on 5 May than Tories, but like the SNP formerly, too spread out to maximise number of MSPs.

    Timing of manifesto launches [1] could affect things as well.

    Tory and Greens out already. SNP launch timed to combine with postal vote packs coming through letterboxes – but Lab not till 8 days before the election!

    [1] Almost nobody reads manifestoes, but they do generate headlines, if parties want to generate thinking among those voters who are still paying attention. :-)

  28. @ Carfew

    ‘Problem with eliminating the deficit is that the economy is not like a household budget and running a deficit puts more money into the private sector to assist growth. Whereas running a surplus takes money from the private sector, restricting growth.
    Would be good to have a poling question on this, see how many peeps are aware, but there’s been the odd polling question to suggest even some polling peeps might not be aware of the household budget issue.’

    I agree. There’s also some evidence that business journalists are a bit shaky on the whole household budget thingy… let alone that a surplus taking from private sector.

  29. Carfrew

    Interesting isn’t it?

  30. I see the London Evening Standard are doing what they always do as the Mayoral election approaches and engaging in front page smears of the Labour candidate.

    I only hope on this occasion such blatant dog whistle tactics fail miserably.

  31. @ Allan Christie

    You ask :
    “”Where did I write that I don’t understand how the threshold works? ”

    To remind you, at 12:01 today you wrote:

    ““I’m not quite sure what the threshold is for inheritance tax (too lazy to look) …”

    at 1:48 you then wrote:
    “I’m sure my parents home under the current threshold would be eligible for inheritance tax but it’s certainly not worth over £400,00.”

    Surely it is clear from the above 2 quotes that you didn’t understand it in practice? Specifically, you appeared unware that it applied only to the portion of the estate in excess of the £325,000 threshold, and of the ability of married couples (such as your parents) to double this to £650,000.

    I stand by my explanations.

  32. @ RAF

    Do you think that the rather bizarre accusations of epidemic anti-semitism in the LP is a ‘Dog whistle’ in the mayoral election? I mean a ‘dog whistle’ to islamaphobia. in other words, by crudely associating the LP and Sadiq Khan with being anti-Jewish, it invites the suggestion that they are exclusively pro-Muslim .

  33. Good evening all from a pleasant night here in Hampshire.

    JAMES E

    You’re clutching at ever shrinking straws. I wrote I wan’t sure what the current threshold was but my guess wasn’t that far off and yes I could not be bothered to look. That does not mean I don’t understand how the inheritance tax works.

    I also wrote about I’m not sure if my parents house would fall under the current threshold this is because I’m unsure of the current value of their house but I know it’s not worth £400k. That;s does not mean I don’t understand how the inheritance tax works.

    So once again you’re trying to put words into my mouth and write tripe that I clearly did not say.

    Don;t worry, I also stand by my explanations. If you’re going to try and score points then I advise you to step it up a gear, in fact step it up several gears.

  34. @Syzygy

    Yes, absolutely. That is what the Crosby-inspired Zac campaign is seeking to portray. In fact the subtext is even cruder than that. It’s that no Muslim – not even one who successfully ran the leadership campaign for a Jewish MP to become leader of the LP, and has run an inclusive mayoral campaign, can ever be trusted simply because he’s a Muslim.

  35. NEIL A

    “In Scotland, the only real news was ever going to be about second place. I don’t personally think it was ever likely that the Tories would pip Labour anyway, but now it’s off the cards completely, so however bad the beating by the SNP, the Labour talking heads will be all about “everyone said the Tories would overtake us when in fact they’ve had a terrible night and we’re still the only alternative to the SNP” etc”
    _______

    It;s amazing how the spin docs will spin stuff. Jackie Baillie (a Labour MSP) tried to portray the UK exit poll as bad for the SNP because a previous opinion poll had them winning all of the Scottish seats.

    The panel including the baldy guy from Exeter University just went into convulsions so if indeed Labour do come in second then you can bet your boots it will have been a right ole miserable night for the Tories blah blah blah and everyone else lost.

    Also if the SNP fail to win St Kilda and Mingulay (permanent population 0) then it will have been an extremely bad night for the SNP.

  36. Amateur thoughts (unlike you lot) on the Referendum.

    Remain’s problem is they do best in territories with the smallest electorates. Approximate eligible electorates: England 37.4 million (of which London 5.2 million), Wales 2.2 million, Scotland 3.9 million, NI 1.2 million, Gibraltar: 23,000. Total 44.7 million.

    Scottish referendum turnout 85 per cent, GE 66 per cent. Assume 72 per cent, so England 26.9 million (of which London 3.74 million), Wales 1.58 million, Scotland 2.8 million, NI 860,000, Gibraltar 20,000 (assumes 90 per cent).

    Remain polls, say, Gibraltar 95 per cent, Scotland 70 per cent, NI 65 per cent, Wales 50 per cent (based on latest polls, though William Hill have Wales Leave 5/2, which it the best punt), London 58 per cent, Rest of England 45 per cent

    So Remain/Leave = Gibraltar 19,000/1,000, Scotland 1,960,000/840,000, NI 559,000/301,000, Wales 790,000/790,000, London 2,169,200/1,570,800, Rest of England: 10,422,000/12,738,000. Total 15,919,200/16,240,800. 49.5/50.5 per cent

    Of the 5.6 million ex-pats, three million can vote (15 year rule). Two years ago only 23,366 were registered, but of course many more could now register – how many will is unknown. About a million live in the EU, so possibly 700,000 are eligible under 15 years rule. Let’s assume 350,000 register and that 90 per cent vote to Remain. This adds 315,000/35,000. (Others outside the EU will also register, but assume they’re evenly split).

    So the new Remain/Leave total is 16,234,200/16,275,800. Leave majority 41,600.

  37. @ Allan Christie

    You did not write that you were “not sure if my parents house would fall under the current threshold”.

    What you actually said at 1:48pm today was the opposite: that you were SURE that your parents house was sufficiently valuable to make their estate liable to the tax. To remind you of your own words again:

    “I’m sure my parents home under the current threshold would be eligible for inheritance tax ”

    As I’ve told you, it is actually is well below the £650,000 threshold for married couples. From what you wrote earlier today, especially the quote above, it is clear that you thought otherwise.

  38. Just to add, the quote I’ve given are exact copy and pastes from what you wrote. Look back to you posts earlier today, if you need to confirm

    A more unkind person might describe them as tripe that you DID write. .

  39. JAMES E

    The point is I don’t know the actual value of my parents house but your stated that I wrote “But you’ve said repeatedly that you don’t know how the threshold works ” which is total tripe because I clearly did not write that.

    Your whole dialogue with me is pure argumentative and you remind me of a former poster who used to post on UKPR under the pseudonym of his two pet dogs I think their names were Rabies and Diabetes, anyway don’t quote me on that but he would almost always single out my comments for some reason.

    It got to the point where the dialogue between us both was pure argumentative and I don’t know how many posts went into moderation but it was a lot and in the end I just ignored him completely. Best thing I ever done.

    I’m going to do the same with you and totally ignore you from now on.

  40. @Jonboy

    Thanks for the stats breakdown, as things stand.

    I suspect, however, that Remain will do better than the present polls as while Leave voters are very committed (more so than Remain) most have already made up their mind. That’s why some surveys are suggesting Leave voters are self certifying a 10/10 likelihood to vote.

    As with the IndyRef many of the as yet uncommitted, or reluctant Remainers, may well decide the outcome in Remain’s favour. We should never underestimate the draw of the status quo in Britain.

  41. Good Evening All.
    Lovely here in Bournemouth tonight.
    RAF and Syzygy.
    Hello to you
    I think that anti semitism in the Labour Party is indeed a major issue about which I hope the LP will not go into denial.

    In terms of the politics of Islam, the investigation on C4 will be interesting to watch, and the tweet of the interview with the Saudi Arabia Ambassador was revealing as the gentlemen was very calm in his defence of beliefs about atheists.

  42. RAF

    I presume the London Evening Standard is following the normal practice of partisan press media in demonising parties that might somehow threaten the interests of their owners and/or advertisers.

    Some things never change.

    However, would BBC London headline a Labour or Tory friendly report [during an election campaign] produced by a body headed by a former Labour or Tory spin doctor?

    It becomes more serious if a news source, generally regarded as – and required to be – impartial, actually wasn’t.

  43. @CL 1945

    Good evening, Sir!

    Most Muslims in the UK are South Asians rather than Arabs. And Wahhabi Arabs really are something entirely different to most other Muslims elsewhere.

    As for the C4 programme, I would check everything you see and hear against the actual ICM poll, as much of the reporting of that poll has not fairly represented it’s findings.

    The rise of anti-Semitism in society generally is a concern. In many ways it’s part of daily Press battering of Muslims and Islam generally. What makes people think that a casual tolerance of racism, bigotry and prejudice against one group, will not spread to racism, bigotry and prejudice against other groups? It really is part of the same issue.

  44. @CL1945

    I apologise for the rogue “it’s”. AutoCorrect is an oxymoron.

  45. @OldNat & RAF

    Whilst the Evening Standard’s partisan coverage is nothing new, what is ‘interesting’ (for want of a better word), is Zac Goldsmith’s apparent willingness to harden his language in the terms he criticizes Sadiq Khan on the issue of ‘Islamic extremism’.

    Whilst allegations that Khan has erred in his judgement in accepting certain speaking engagements, appeared in public with undesirable fringe figures from the Muslim community and not done enough to distance himself and condemn some radical elements are not new, the language used in the interview today is and the clear implications that Khan ‘gives a platform to extremism’ and so on do change the tone of the campaign rather.

    This is not the place for working through the issues of the rights or wrongs of Khan’s actions or Goldsmith’s campaign, but… recently Khan’s lead has seemed stable and reasonably substantial. If Goldsmith carries on with this sort of line, it might give an indication of whether this style of ‘attack politics’ so prevalent in the US and Australia might be coming our way.

    One question as to the political wisdom of Goldsmith’s tactics. It’s often said that Boris Johnson was able to win the mayoralty by reaching people who would never normally vote Conservative (though this is more supposition than established fact and there are likely more complex factors at play), but if that theory is even part true, is this new hard Zac – as opposed to the cuddly green Tory from Richmond – likely to attract these same swing voters?

  46. I should have said above that if Goldsmith continues with this line of attack and it proves successful could it herald more of this kind of politics coming our way from the US and Oz.

  47. Interesting, in the latest YouGov poll Corbyn is seen as more trusted on Europe than Cameron by 28 to 21. Is that Panama fallout to the revelation of the letter to the EU? Would seem to suggest that the Labour strategy of ‘do nothing and let the Toreis rip chunks out of one another, then do a cavalry charge and claim credit for the victory’ is rolling along smoothly

    Top line figures are:

    Lab 34
    C 31
    Ukip 17
    LD 8
    Other 11

  48. Here is an updated EWMA for Con, Lab and UKIP including the latest 34/31/17 Yougov:

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzTTW1ecy-NDZmpJZmRIeHVfUXM/view?usp=sharing

    The Conservatives still slipping, Labour and UKIP holding okay but not breaking through.

  49. @ RAF

    ‘Yes, absolutely. That is what the Crosby-inspired Zac campaign is seeking to portray. In fact the subtext is even cruder than that. It’s that no Muslim – not even one who successfully ran the leadership campaign for a Jewish MP to become leader of the LP, and has run an inclusive mayoral campaign, can ever be trusted simply because he’s a Muslim.’

    Thanks, that’s what I guessed and I knew that you’d be the right person to ask :)

  50. Anarchists Unite

    Putting change numbers on those figures

    LAB: 34% (-)
    CON: 31% (-2)
    UKIP: 17% (+1)
    LDEM: 8% (+2)

    Looks like more data to come from the YG Full Scottish poll –

    Times reporting that 47% trust Scottish Government to manage North Sea resources, while 14% back the UK Government (no further details) – Better late than never! :-)

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