A quick update on some polling figures from the last few days.

ComRes released a new telephone poll for the Daily Mail on Friday. Topline voting intention figures were CON 37%, LAB 32%, LDEM 6%, UKIP 12%, GRN 4% (tabs are here.) On the EU referendum ComRes had voting intentions of REMAIN 54%, LEAVE 36%, DK 10%.

YouGov also released new figures on voting intention and the EU referendum on their website. Their lastest topline VI figures are CON 39%, LAB 30%, LDEM 6%, UKIP 17%, GRN 3% (tabs are here). On the EU referendum they have Leave slightly ahead – REMAIN 38%, LEAVE 42%, DK/WNV 20%.

Finally Ipsos MORI also released EU referendum figures (part of the monthly Political Monitor survey I wrote about earlier in the week). Their latest figures are REMAIN 50%, LEAVE 38%, DK 12%.

There continues to be a big contrast between EU referendum figures in polls conducted by telephone, and conducted online. The telephone polls from ComRes and Ipsos MORI both have very solid leads for remain, the online polls from ICM, YouGov, Survation and others all tend to have the race very close. In one sense the contrast seems to be in line with the contrast we saw in pre-election polls – while there was little consistent difference between online and telephone polls in terms of the position of Labour and the Conservatives (particularly in the final polls), there was a great big gulf in terms of the levels of UKIP support they recorded – in the early part of 2015 there was a spread of about ten points between those (telephone) pollsters showing the lowest levels of UKIP support and those (online) pollsters showing the highest levels of UKIP support. It doesn’t seem particularly surprising that this online/telephone gap in terms of UKIP support also translates into an online/telephone gap in terms of support for leaving the EU. In terms of which is the better predictor it doesn’t give us much in the way of clues though – the 13% UKIP ended up getting was bang in the middle of that range.

The other interesting thing about the telephone/online contrast in EU referendum polling is the don’t knows. Telephone polls are producing polls that have far fewer people saying they don’t know how they’ll vote (you can see it clearly in the polls in this post – the two telephone polls have don’t knows of 10% and 12%, the online poll has 20% don’t knows, the last couple of weekly ICM online polls have had don’t knows of 17-18%). This could have something to do with the respective levels of people who are interested in politics and the EU that the different sampling approaches are picking up, or perhaps something to do with people’s willingness to give their EU voting intention to a human interviewer. The surprising thing is that this is not a typical difference – in polls on how people would vote in a general election the difference is, if anything, in the other direction – telephone polls find more don’t knows and refusals than online polls do. Why it’s the other way round on the EU referendum is an (intriguing) mystery.


243 Responses to “Latest ComRes and YouGov polls”

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  1. @RMJ

    Doing up a property may require cash and time you may not have when holding down several part time jobs on minimum wage, and paying through the nose on rent and bills. You may not even be able to save the bigger deposits required and insecure employment does not help in getting mortgages.

    Also, don’t forget the increasing prevalence of the zero hours thing, where you are made to wait on call whether you’re given much work in the end or not.

    Look at the TREND. Is this stuff getting worse or better? If you were a young person looking ahead to the future, would you vote for more of the same?

    an article in the Times, on about the changes coming to middle class careers. Solicitors vanishing from the High Street. Some jobs are displaced to other sectors, but possibly worse pay and conditions. And then, the rise of automation, globalisation, and peeps not being able to afford solicitors all leading to job losses.

    But not enough being generated elsewhere to compensate. Repeat this for other sectors. Thus heading towards a scenario of a few elite jobs, and lots of low paid jobs, but hollowed out in the middle. Boomers might vote for that, but others?

  2. RMJ

    The problem with today’s housing market is that in most places it’s well out of the reach for first time buyers and people who are single even if they are earning a good wage.

    I was lucky my parents gave me quite a bit towards a deposit for my first flat when I was 23. About 4 months ago I relocated to London and the company I work for put me up in a flat they own in central London but that was only for 6 months then after that I had to buy my own place, rent in London or move back up to Scotland and work in their Scottish office again.

    I decided to stay and work for the company in London and even though I sold my flat back in Scotland quite quickly and at a good price, there was no way I could afford to buy a place in London close to my work but instead bought a place in Hampshire which I’m not complaining about because it’s quite rural and the quality of life in a village is much better than the daily filth you have to breath in London every day.

    I’m in my mid twenties earning not a bad wage but if it weren’t for the generosity for my parents giving me a deposit for my first flat then I would either be renting a one bed dump in London at over 1,000 per month or I wouldn’t had put in a transfer request to work in London.

    Unless you have parents who are in a position to help out then quite frankly the housing market is well out of the reach for most people in their twenties and in work.

  3. Even up north, housing tends to be cheap where the jobs aren’t. Costs rather more to live nearer the jobs.

  4. And another problem we have in our inner cites is gentrification. Chuck out the council tenants from their damp homes, spend a little money re cladding the houses, shove in some hippies and artists, give some money for new business start ups such as coffee shops and deranged looking boutique clothing shops, re brand the area as (up and coming) and hey presto….the house prices rocket!!

  5. CARFREW
    Even up north, housing tends to be cheap where the jobs aren’t. Costs rather more to live nearer the jobs
    ______

    You;re right but even in Scotland areas such as the West end and riverside in Glasgow, the dock areas in Leith and Edinburgh’s old town (all of which are very close to the Scottish financial centers) house/flat prices are well out of the reach for ordinary workers on average wages.

  6. @Allan

    Yes, that does happen. Irony is that eventually the arty peeps can’t afford to live there and move out, so the gentry peeps don’t get to live in the boho community after all. They just live with each other, the peeps they were trying to escape from in the first place.

    That said, at least there are more coffee shops…

  7. CARFREW

    ” Irony is that eventually the arty peeps can’t afford to live there and move out, so the gentry peeps don’t get to live in the boho community after all. They just live with each other, the peeps they were trying to escape from in the first place”
    _____

    Ha!! serves them right anyway, them and their tambourine sessions and obscure haircuts, they are welcome to each other. ;-)

  8. @Allan

    I didn’t know about the tambourine sessions!! Thanks for the heads up.

    P.s. keep an eye on who Hilary hires as interns. That could be a clue as to the revenge thing…

  9. ALLAN CHRISTIE @ CARFREW

    “Even up north, housing tends to be cheap”

    It wasn’t true in pre-oil Aberdeen: especially not during the oil boom, and not now.

    Aberdeen is, of course, to the south if you live in Caithness and Newcastle even more so.

    Without a constraining limit, “north” is a direction – not a place!

    As to house prices, they reflect the cost of the land much more than the house construction – and land costs are determined by demand.

    The increased wealth that so many people (especially boomers) have experienced through increased property values isn’t necessarily down to their own brilliance and hard work, but because public policy has increased demand for land where they (or relatives from they inherited) lived.

    I don’t suppose my generation is any more blinkered and self-centred than any other, but I do find the self-congratulation of so many of them particularly objectionable, because it is my generation.

    In any case, “reality” is sod all to do with polling and voting.

    The perceptions of very many younger people is that their opportunities are more restricted than that of their parents (whose perception was that their opportunities were greater).

    That difference is likely to affect political attitudes.

  10. CARFREW
    There are economic models proving that historically, if you invested in real estate in nascent artistic communities (Montmartre, Bloomsbury, St. Ives, Soho in New York, Miami Beach etc.) you would have made far more money than if you’d bought the art.

  11. @David Colby

    I can well believe that. Especially if you’d bought my art!!

  12. CARFREW
    That’s funny :)

  13. @oldnat

    What a lot of this comes down to, is attribution. Where do you place the blame or credit for summat. And indeed, polling is often trying to work out how peeps attribute. Do they blame the banks or Labour for the crash? Or both? Or Thatch for deregulating? Do they blame immigration or developers land banks for house prices or govt. policy etc. etc.

    In the end, one needs an exhaustive analysis, but most don’t do that. Even when it comes down to who was responsible for a goal, some will say it’s who scored, some the guy who fed the scorer, some the guy who split the defence with a forty yard pass, some the defender who dispossessed an attacker at the other end, or maybe it was the manager who implemented a zonal defence that facilitated the dispossession.

    Or was it all of it or part of it or summat else. Was the defence splitting pass an accident where he meant to do summat else?

    Most peeps will not do the full analysis. Even pollsters, even after what happened, dismiss some factors in their failure too readily. In the end, one way you avoid fooling yourself is to test your ideas. (But boomers do have a sense of entitlement like no others, as I discover routinely when they elbow me brusquely out the way when trying to get the best seats at gigs. Mostly only boomers who can afford to go these days. I’d let them have the seats anyways…)

  14. I mean, even at a Georgie Fame gig!!

  15. Carfrew

    “But boomers do have a sense of entitlement like no others, as I discover routinely when they elbow me brusquely out the way when trying to get the best seats at gigs”

    Actually, that’s just normal behaviour from some oldies, I’m afraid.

    My Mum (and others of her age) embarrassed the hell out of me 40 years ago when she shouldered her way to the front of the queue.

  16. @oldnat

    Well, it’s new to me but fair enough. I won’t be doing it myself though. I try and be nice to peeps…

  17. I was intrigued to hear that Hillary Clinton won 6 coin tosses in a row last night in Iowa.

    That’s a 64 – 1 chance.

    She’s very lucky…..

  18. Took me 30 seconds of googling to find out that current average rents in Manchester are £1,059pcm http://www.home.co.uk/for_rent/manchester/current_rents?location=manchester, in Newcastle £847 http://ww w.home.co.uk/for_rent/newcastle_upon_tyne/current_rents?location=newcastle_upon_tyne

    Doesn’t sound too cheap to me.

  19. Carfrew

    I suspect such anti-social behaviours are actually the consequence of changing brain function as life goes on.

    At the time, I just vowed [1] never to replicate that myself.

    [1] Because it wasn’t a Gordon Brown/Daily Record “Vow”, it’s been quite easy to keep. :-)

  20. ‘I mean, even at a Georgie Fame gig!!’

    First record I ever bought was ‘Yeh yeh’ and I certainly wouldn’t be elbowing anyone at a Georgie Fame gig!

    Re gentrification, a friend’s ex-council place in Peckham has increased in price by about 100k in two years. I nearly wrote ‘value’ but that of course hasn’t changed. It’s still just a house in which she happily lives.

  21. @oldnat

    I dunno, my parents would never have behaved that way. I was quite surprised by it. But it was a bit tongue in cheek, I wouldn’t condemn a strata of society on the basis of just gig behaviour.

    If they mess with my coffee as well though…

  22. @Syzygy

    It was well worth going to see Georgie, I thought. He tours with his sons as a trio these days, and tells of how things were back in the days of the Flamingo Club etc.

    Saw Jimmy Webb on his solo tour last year and he had tales to tell as well.

  23. @ Carfew

    Sounds good. I remember the Flamingo Club and Cousins and Tiles and Manor House and.. (but don’t tell my mum .. she still doesn’t know).

  24. @Syzygy

    Wow!! You went to the Flamingo!! Now I’m jealous. I promise not to tell your Mum. My mum took some persuading to let me go to my first gig so I know what it’s like…

  25. Is this the Carfrew show now? For God’s sake get over yourself! Every generation has its own problems. You talk about full employment – we have that now. Yes, some graduates may have jobs that they are over-qualified for, but that is either their own fault, or we are producing too many graduates.

    You seem to have an obsession with what you call ‘boomers’. I’m guessing that means people born between about 1945 and 1955? Correct me if I’m wrong. Yes, perhaps pensions were better than now for some who worked for the government or very big companies, but not for many people. However, we lived through things like imminent nuclear destruction, 20%+ inflation etc etc. We all have hard luck stories, we just don’t all moan about it all the time.

  26. Pete B

    “Every generation has its own problems.”

    Quite correct. And every generation responds to those problems as they see fit.

    That was the original point being made – that younger adults are making different political choices from older folk, to an extent that hasn’t been seen for many years.

    On a polling site, that seems to be a pattern worth investigating.

    Oldies moaning that they had hard luck stories too aren’t.

  27. @Pete B

    Thanks for the ad hominem. Strangely you never complain when Colin goes on about Corbyn or ToH on the size of the state.

    We don’t have full employment yet, and being closer to full employment back in the sixties involved rather more proper jobs.

    I don’t have an obsession with boomers. That’s another ad hominem. They are a powerful voting bloc which therefore crop up a lot, in this case because peeps, including Colin, wondering about the rise of Corbyn and Sanders.

    It isn’t moaning either. It’s just looking at explanations. At no point have I moaned. That’s yet another ad hominem. But I shall not indulge your attempt to escalate. Which you have tried a few times in the past, actually.

    As it happens, rather than being obsessed, I declined to respond to your last post on the boomer issue a while back to give you a break on the matter.

    Maybe in hindsight I should have responded. Saying about twenty percent inflation shows you are still missing the point. There are temporary inconveniences and longer term ceilings. The stuff you go on about, is temporary inconvenience. You could still buy houses and profit handsomely. Careers often stable and well remunerated and could support a family on a single wage.

    Younger peeps today are seeing things deteriorating more fundamentally in important ways. Buying a house becoming a dream, instead of difficult at times, as is a stable career with a good pension.

    The nuclear thing was a worry, sure, but it didn’t put a ceiling on your housing or career. We have worries now about climate change. In the end, if you consider what the younger peeps are facing, the employment trends, are you really saying you see no valid reason they might consider an alternative model?

    Housing is getting further out of reach, as are good careers, and pensions, and you don’t have anything against that do you? Have you found a solution to the impact of globalisation or automation on employment? Or the immigration that’ll likely make us the biggest population in Western Europe around 2050 and its cumulative effect over decades on employment and housing etc.

  28. @oldna

    Over at the Independent, they’ve got polling on which democrats prefer Clinton or Sanders, and why.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-election-2016-the-difference-between-clinton-and-sanders-in-one-chart-a6848841.html

    Given a choice between experience and ability to win, and honest and caring, Seems to boil down to older voters wanting Clinton for experience and winning potential, and younger voters wanting someone honest and caring.

    Clinton has the advantage of more non-white voters etc. in states to come…

  29. @Carfew

    It’s difficult to remember where I saw bands now but I’m pretty sure that I saw both the Who and the Kinks at the Flamingo; Georgie Fame at Ronnie Scott’s; John Mayall loads of times at Manor House; Geno Washington at Tottenham Royal; Incredible String Band at the Roundhouse; Roger Chapman and Family at all sorts of Polytechnics; Jethro Tull at Reading University; and so on. My friend Maggie and I skived off school more than a few times to go dancing in Tiles at lunchtime too… wearing our school hockey culottes which were very fashionable for a bit (which the maroon tennis knickers never were). I also saw a 14y old Mike Oldfield playing alongside his sister, in a folk club in a Wokingham pub. Thanks for causing me to remember :)

  30. @Syzygy

    No probs, it’s great hearing about it. Must have been fab. I’d have loved to have been a part of it. Would particularly have liked to have seen Floyd at the UFO. I remember working in the factory in my hols and older peeps talking about the time the Beatles or Stones played the local club… That amazed me, that they used to play such small venues. Sometimes twice a day. Different world…

  31. @Syzygy

    I must also say, just how timeless that music is. At the moment the coffee shops are playing a lot of Bowie, but it’s quite normal to hear loads from the sixties and seventies, from people in their early twenties, and it’s not superficial, they know their stuff.

    Don’t suppose you saw Clapton with Mayall did ya?

  32. PETEB

    Its pointless arguing with obsessives. Denting the central tenets their chosen “issue” , is like removing the purpose of their lives.

    I mean-old person of my family once elbowed way to head of queue-there is no response to this stuff.

  33. Perhaps Blogs about The Evil Trump will begin to dwindle a little now.

    UK supporters of the Democrat cause would have been better employed worrying about Rubio-and the unappealing candidacies of Clinton or Sanders.

  34. I wonder if Cameron gambled all along that the “terms” of his New Deal wouldn’t actually feature in the Referendum Vote decision making of the average voter?

    He’d better hope this is true, because if this dog’s breakfast of unworkable bureaucratic procedures is actually considered by voters, Cameron could be the man who brought about Brexit.

    And I doubt very much that anyone knows the economic outcome of that -however much they pontificate about it.

  35. @Colin

    I dunno Colin, I often take my cue from what you guys are obsessing over. Like the Corbyn thing, I was responding to that. Earlier you were concerned about the lack of a sunny disposition, but… I actually have some polling on the matter.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-35471624

    Apparently boomers aged 65 to 79 are happiest of all, those in the cohort below, 50 to 64, are least happy.

    Article suggests being retired, free of parental responsibilities etc. is why you guys are so happy. As opposed to the cohort below, wrestling with careers and caring for elderly parents etc.

    Could be economic differences too of course.

    So you can stop worrying about people worrying now. Especially because, I bring you further great news!!

    The founder of easyjet is bringing you…. Easyfood!! A store to undercut Lidl, in which everything is only 25p. He was inspired by food banks.

  36. “I wonder if Cameron gambled all along that the “terms” of his New Deal wouldn’t actually feature in the Referendum Vote decision making of the average voter?”

    ——–

    Well it’s featuring in the headlines…

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-the-papers-35479594

    Which are not the most flattering…

  37. GARFREW

    Your concern for my generation is touching.

    Try to cultivate other interests though-I recommend Storage Technology my U3A has a very active Group on this absorbing subject.

  38. @Colin

    Honestly, I’m trying to find points of agreement but you seem to keep wanting to find points of difference. I do have other interests, and I mentioned my generation as well. That was my point: I had polling evidence to support your contention on the sunny disposition thing. The sunlight thing was your thing, not mine. You’re confusing who is obsessed here. And I’m trying to bring polling back into it but you don’t seem to care.

    Anyway, to miss the point does not “dent” my argument, nor does citing irrelevant stats, and my point wasn’t focused on boomers anyway, that’s just boomers thinking everything is about them. It’s not just me Col., looking at future patterns of employment, like the article in the Times on Friday, by Philip Collins: “Robots could exterminate the middle class”.

    “The first decade of the 20th Century (sic), in the U.S. And UK, has passed with the net creation of no new jobs. Opportunities in novel industries, such as computing, are not keeping pace with the destruction in employment caused by same. A recent report by Deloitte suggested that, within twenty years, 60 percent of today’s jobs in retail could be automated. Almost three quarters of jobs in transport could easily be done by simple machines or complex robots, and automation in factories, already extensive, will continue apace. That would mean 11 million put out of work. Andrew Haldane, chief economist at the BoE warned last year that middle-income jobs could be hollowed out by machines, leaving only need low-paid and high-paid jobs behind”.

  39. CARFREW

    Yes I read the Collins piece.

    It reminded me somewhat of articles when I was younger predicting job losses from technology change. And the digital revolution has certainly changed the world. I think the thing which those precursors of Collins missed was the new & different jobs which technology itself has generated.

    And do we really miss the world of spade & shovel now?

    Change is constant-effects are difficult to predict. Hopefully there will be good as well as bad.

  40. @Colin

    Well, the point appears to be not that new tech doesn’t create jobs, but that “opportunities in novel industries,much as computing, are not keeping pace with the destruction in employment caused by same”.

    Now, the real issue here, is that in the past, if manufacturing jobs got trashed, peeps could move into services. But if now service jobs get trashed by the rise of comms and databases and the algorithm etc., you see the problem…

    …And it’s not just the march of tech. It’s globalisation. It’s changes in terms and conditions, zero hours etc., it’s concentration of wealth. All these things acting together to make life trickier.

    And, this is before things like the info. glut, making decisions harder. It’s possible, that the importance of honesty revealed in that poll earlier may be a response to this. If there’s too much info. to check stuff yourself, you need to be able to trust those in power.

    I say this because there’s a video short on the Beeb looking at what Millenials want from employers, and apparently honesty and trust features again.

  41. And I should add… That regarding your hope that change is good as well as bad, well, there is plenty of change going on, and a lot of it may be good in theory, but in practice, it isn’t much cop if only a few reap the rewards. That may be part of the Millennial concern. Do the benefits get spread widely or concentrated in the hands of the few.

  42. @ Carfew

    ‘Don’t suppose you saw Clapton with Mayall did ya?’

    Yes! He always wore white tennis shoes which we called ‘Clactons’ (Mods wore them to visit the seaside) but thereafter were ‘Y’r Claptons’. In fact, I also saw the first time that Peter Green played with John Mayall instead of Clapton!

    I was far too little to be there – 13/14y old… makes my hair stand a bit on end when I think about my own daughters emulating but somehow we survived without harm. I think we must have been quite streetwise even at that age.

    I agree it’s very impressive how familiar teens/20 somethings are with music from all eras – the internet has been just stunning in broadening horizons. One of my daughter’s boyfriends was amazed that I had Club Ska 67 because apparently Phil Jupitus has that as one of his top LPs, with every song scoring a star. Who’d thought I’d get such kudos 50y on… ..

  43. @ Carfew
    ‘Don’t suppose you saw Clapton with Mayall did ya?’
    Yes! He always wore white tennis shoes which we called ‘Clactons’ (Mods wore them to visit the seaside) but thereafter were ‘Y’r Claptons’. In fact, I also saw the first time that Peter Green played with John Mayall instead of Clapton!
    I was far too little to be there – 13/14y old… makes my hair stand a bit on end when I think about my own daughters emulating but somehow we survived without harm. I think we must have been quite streetwise even at that age.
    I agree it’s very impressive how fami-l-iar teens/20 somethings are with music from all eras – the internet has been just stunning in broadening horizons. One of my daughter’s boyfriends was amazed that I had Club Ska 67 because apparently Phil Jupitus has that as one of his top LPs, with every song scoring a star. Who’d thought I’d get such kudos 50y on… ..

  44. Regarding the ‘Rise of the Robots’ – business-as-usual optimists pin their hopes on this being like every previous tech revolution; that the new technology will bring new opportunities to replace the older types of work with more new and exciting roles for humans. There are a number of problems with this view.

    Previous tech revolutions have been about enabling humans to do more with less. They have yielded productivity multipliers. But we still required human operators. This type of productivity increase didn’t have to send people to the dole queues provided the economy was not growth-limited by availability of other resources.

    The other thing that has rescued us from previous tech revolutions, is the ability to invent new jobs. Particularly, ‘services’.

    This time it’s different because we’re talking about machines that have a far greater degree of autonomy. The only employment they generate is for a small cadre of very highly skilled specialists. (And even they may find themselves surplus to requirements eventually).

    The problem here, is this: Oh, you invented a new job? That’s nice. Here’s a robot that’s learnt how to do your new job already.

    The established economic orthodoxy simply has no solution to this that can end well.

  45. “Every generation has its own problems.”

    Sure, but what if your generation’s problem is the other generation?

  46. Re the discussion on young people’s prospects:

    People have such a rose tinted view of the past.

    There are ups and downs and, yes, the current quality of life is probably lower than 10 years ago but if you look at the general trend in standard of living it has been generally upwards for decades.

    I suspect if the vast majority of young people were transported back to the 80s or earlier they would beg to come back to the present day.

    Housing is one issue that is notably worse but almost every other measure is so much better.

    We have better lives, without the drudgery of a world without mod cons, or without central heating, or indoor toilets (still common in many parts of the country in to 80s).

    We have the internet, more entertainment options, more food choices, more holiday choices.

    And our life expectancy is 10 years higher.

    In fact, if people did decide to go back the way people lived in the 80s many would find that, miraculously, their bank balance suddenly start growing rather than shrinking.

    Of course that’s not possible because our expectations have grown.

    If baby boomers had it easier when they were young it’s only because they expected less.

  47. @Carfrew @Colin @Pete B

    The descent into who has it worse, boomers or the current generation, is likely to lead to a statistical dead end, last man standing, checkmate or any other cliche you want to posit.
    The fact is that intergenerational statistical comparisons ignore such things as cultural and social expectations. For polling purposes this means that who had it worse is irrelevant.
    What is relevant is what each generation “feel” in respect of their position in society and about the social and political structures that order that society. On that basis if the younger generation is dissatisfied with its current position and prospects it may seek solutions which alter that. Conversely if the older generation is satisfied it may seek to maintain the status quo. Into this mix must be factored all the other elements of a persons life, lifestyle and political/philosophical beliefs.
    What I understand Carfrew to be saying is that the younger generation feels dissatisfied (whether that is justified or not is unimportant for polling) therefore the apparent attraction of the young to Corbyn can be explained, at least in part, by that dissatisfaction. I cannot say whether that analysis is correct but it is a possible explanation for the phenomenon.
    As a post Boomer but not of the younger generation (1961) I feel it incumbent on me to attempt to pour oil on these troubled waters :-(

  48. Lol, sure there are opportunities but a lot of the younger don’t have the time or money to avail themselves of them. Paying through the nose for rent and utilities while on rubbish wages. That’s why increasingly it’s older peeps out in the city going to clubs and stuff.

  49. @Syzygy

    That’s very special, to see Clapton in the Bluesbreaker days. And Peter Green too. I didn’t get to see Clapton till the early eighties. On the ska thing, I was surprised to find young jazzers know their ska these days, and they incorporate it along with other elements into the jazz. It’s all very eclectic.

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