Ipsos MORI released their monthly political monitor yesterday, topline voting intention numbers are CON 37%, LAB 31%, LDEM 10%, UKIP 9%. These are on the basis of some minor interim changes to methodology (in this case adding how habitually people vote to the turnout model) while the inquiry continues longer term solutions are worked upon. Tabs are here. MORI also asked a question about whether people thought the four Labour leadership candidates had what it took to be a good Prime Minister. Andy Burnham had the best score (or the least worst) – 27% of people thought he did, 27% disagreed. In comparison 22% thought Yvette Cooper did, 16% Liz Kendall and 17% Jeremy Corbyn.

YouGov also published the rest of their poll of Labour party members, conducted for the Times. Tables for part one of the research are here, part two here. The second wave included a question on why party members are voting as they are, showing the contrast between what is driving Burnham, Cooper, Kendall and Corbyn voters. Burnham supporters say they are backing him because he has the best chance of winning, will unite the party and will be the best opposition to the Conservatives. The answers from Cooper supporters are similar, though there is less emphasis on party unity. For Kendall supporters the key reason to back her is seen as having the best change of winning, followed by the being the strongest opposition – 31% of her supporters say they are backing her as a break from Ed Miliband’s party, and only 10% see her as a unifier. The drivers for supporters of Jeremy Corbyn contrast sharply with the other three – only 5% of his supporters say they are backing him as the candidate who has the best chance of winning in 2020, only 5% are backing him as a unifier, the reasons are overwhelmingly because they think he has the best policies and because they think he is a break from New Labour.


517 Responses to “Ipsos MORI/Standard – CON 37, LAB 31, LDEM 10, UKIP 9”

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  1. COUPER2802

    @” so unless Scotland really is a hotbad of the hard left, with totally different values to rUK,”

    Best delete “unless”

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/labour-less-electable-than-under-ed-miliband-and-needs-radical-rethink-to-regain-power-10420140.html

  2. The entire UK media is against Corbyn and it still makes no difference to Corbyn’s popularity. I bet Nick Clegg is thinking that could have been me if only I had some principles and stuck to my promise.

  3. Exactly, Couper

    Roger asked me above if Douglas Carswell came to our Clacton CLP meeting to speak in favour of JC. In fact, of all the candidates, I would think Carswell would be most concerned about JC becoming leader, at least in his own Clacton seat.

    During the General Election I heard two reasons on the doorstep being given for supporting Carswell. The first was immigration, which JC is not going to change. But there was a significant number who said they were going to vote UKIP because there was no difference between Labour and Conservative and that Labour had abandoned the “working man”. I certainly got the feeling from them that their support for UKIP was only temporary and if the Labour Party went back to its roots they would return.

    There were also a significant number of people who said they used to be Labour but now weren’t voting for any party mainly for the same reason.

    The effect of having JC as leader may be different in other parts of the country, but here in a UKIP stronghold I think he will be the best leader we can have to dent Carswell’s vote and, I guess, will be the same in those Northern seats where UKIP have made inroads.

  4. 2015 Q2 GDP + 0.7%

    YOY + 2.6% pa

  5. @LIZH
    @NORBOLD

    Another similarity with the SNP is that no matter what the media throw at Corbyn it seems to make him stronger, the MSM will react with fury when he wins because they know their power is diminished, which is a very good thing for Labour’s chances in 2020.

    Of the four candidates Corbyn probably offers the best chance of a Labour win in 2020. The others obviously do not inspire people to vote for them.

  6. @COUPER2802

    What the media who are the tools of the Establishment don’t get is that people have had enough of the status quo. Maybe they do get it but don’t know how to reverse things. Their biggest mistake was attacking EdM to the extent that people were put off voting for Labour. EdM would have changed things very gradually and the Blairites could have still retained some influence. Now their world has been turned upside down and we might even get a NO to neoliberal EU.

  7. @Colin

    When I read this piece in the Grauniad a few days ago (very much against the tide of their other offerings on the subject), I thought at the time that you might benefit from reading it. Your latest post reminded me.

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jul/26/smart-tories-labour-jeremy-corbyn-mania-david-cameron

    Here are some selective quotes:

    “My straw poll of Tories and their response to the Labour leadership contest is not remotely scientific, but revealed certain unmistakable trends. Yes, there are some who cannot disguise their glee at Corbyn-mania and their general disdain for the mediocrity of the contest. Complacent Tories are not a pretty sight.
    Yet there are surprisingly few of them, truth to tell.”

    and

    “And in a broader sense, the sort of Conservatives who think intelligently and strategically – and there are more of them than you think – fret that a bearded 66-year-old socialist has ignited political debate in a way that absolutely nobody in the mainstream predicted. He has stormed through the crash barriers of contemporary politics as if they weren’t there, presenting the ideals of the left as if they were brand new and absolutely tailored to the needs of our age. He has shown that party modernisation of the sort that Blair championed for 13 years is as brittle as balsa. What message does that have for Cameron, whose modernisation strategy has been much less consistent and committed than Blair’s?”

  8. I see that Corbyn is now second favourite at 11/4, overtaking Cooper who is now available at 7/2.

    Burnham steady at evens, and Kendall right out of it at 40/1.

  9. The SNP’s appeal is based on saying you can have everything..and have lower taxes. J Corbyn is not going to be allowed that.

  10. PHIL HAINES

    You clearly didn’t read my 9.02 post in response to TOH.

    That was ref. a Burnham win , which I still think is what DC will face.

    If it is JC, frankly i doubt if the Labour Party understands what will ensue-let alone the Tories.

  11. Barney

    “The SNP’s appeal is based on saying you can have everything..and have lower taxes.”

    Blair got away with it. In fact, that is what all election winning politicians say because it is what the voters want to hear and believe.

  12. BARNEY

    @”J Corbyn is not going to be allowed that.”

    Not allowed by whom?

    This is the $64k question-what will the policy platform under JC look like-and who will be responsible for it in Shadow Cabinet?

    If you take the man at his word it won’t be too far adrift from your”you can have everything..and have lower taxes.”……..except for the “rich” of course who will by higher taxes-and companies who will pay higher taxes.
    ” The National Education Service”, state owned Rail/Gas/Elec/Water ,higher Welfare provision etc etc will be funded byFiscal Deficits & Bank of England money printing.

    …….if he can find buyers for UK’s Gilts & a BoE Governor prepared to print Helicopter Money.

  13. Apart from under Tony Blair the Labour Party hasn’t won a working HOC majority for 50 years.

    And from the polling it seems Blair would be stone last now in a Labour leadership vote being about as popular as a rattler in a lucky dip.

    The current candidates are frankly awful and the Labour Party looks like it will take another 50 years to get a working majority once more.

    I am a Labour supporter, but I must admit I am on the verge of becoming an ex-Labour supporter.

    I’d love to see a poll on churn since the election, I have to think it is very high back and fore just now.

  14. Colin

    It is interesting that you see the left as backing low general taxation.

  15. Hawthorn and Colin
    It may be my memory but I can’t remember T Blair promising lower taxes. J Corbyn will be put under huge pressure to answer the questions posed by Colin…and by the way the SNP are still promising lower taxes for business.

  16. Barney

    New Labour cut the basic rate of income tax by quite a bit during the boom – it is what they did not what they promised. Of course, other, stealthier taxes went up to compensate. That is of course straight out of the Lawson playbook.

    It is when they get caught out (e.g. the 10p tax fiasco) that the trouble starts. This will happen to Osborne, possibly starting next June when 3 million low paid workers suddenly wonder why their take home pay just shrank.

  17. Sorry, that should have said next April of course (or maybe later depending on when the budget measures kick in).

  18. In the general optimistic discussion about the possible effect that Corbyn might have on Labour’s chances, I am strongly reminded of past discussions here on the topic of Miliband’s electoral appeal, and how it would grow as the public began to appreciate his unusual and mould-breaking style, abandon their love of presentational politics and be impressed by his challenges to the establishment. There was also widespread agreement that any media attack on him would backfire, as the media doesn’t have the power it used to have and would inadvertently burnish his credentials as a fighter for justice (etc, etc).

    Good luck, this time, comrades!

  19. Oliver Cooper in the Telegraph saying Corbyn if elected leader would be a disaster for Tories even if Labour did not win the election. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/labour/11767152/Tories-dont-vote-for-Jeremy-Corbyn.-It-wont-end-well.html

    He says:”Corbyn’s views will be more left-wing, so will shift the entire political debate to the left. Long-term, so long as Labour and the Conservatives remain the two major parties in the UK, the only way to make progress is to persuade Labour to accept our position. Our ideas don’t win just when our party does, but when the other party advocates our ideas, too.”

  20. @LizH,

    I see what he’s saying but I think he’s fundamentally wrong.

    Elections are won from the centre. If Labour tack left, it makes the Tories look less right wing not more right wing, as they get to use the balanced language of the centre without struggling to differentiate themselves from their opponents. I think the Tories know that the anchoring of the Coalition years did wonders for their credibility with floating voters. Osborne seems to have cottoned on to this with the recent budget, albeit the presentation is more centrist than the substance is.

    Cooper is right that Corbyn could win in 2020. Anyone could, if the stars aligned correctly. But I think he remains the best prospect for the long-term interests of the Conservative party. Once upon a time Labour might have allowed him two cracks at winning a GE, but not these days.

  21. @Neil A

    I suppose it’s all a matter of opinion how things will pan out.

  22. In their discussion last night I think both Candy and BM11 are wrong on the line a Corbyn Labour Party could take on an EU referendum. Assuming that Cameron does manage to negotiate substantial ‘business- friendly’ concessions[1] that infuriate the left, it would very easy to campaign for a No vote. The point would be sell it not as a definite Out, but a vote of no confidence in Cameron to be followed by renegotiation[2]. They can also claim that Cameron has given away all sorts of precious British things in his desperation to get a deal as well, making No patriotic as well.

    If Cameron then loses the vote (and can you imagine him holding his Party together in such a campaign?) he will have to resign. How can he hang on to implement a policy he has denounced? And there will be enormous pressure for a fresh election and the mechanism to call one

    Any subsequent Labour government will have certain advantages in their dealings with Brussels who are worried about EU disintegration. And we know from Ireland that the EU doesn’t like to take No for an answer.

    All this would mean that Labour would be able to keep the Party pretty much together, even the Blairites would feel uncomfortable campaigning on a platform of “Vote Yes to persecute the workers”. Or maybe not.

    [1] If he doesn’t get any thing but a few lukewarm words (which is the most likely option), all Labour needs to do is keep pointing this out; promise ‘proper’ renegotiations (cue lots of photo-ops with Euro-pols); and watch the Conservative Party tear itself apart. There are probably all sort of Commons motions you can put forward to stymie things as well (minimum turnout say? – the Scots would love that).

    [2] This might also give the SNP etc the opportunity to campaign for ‘No But’ as well and so avoid the awkward dilemma that others have outlined. But in the end it’s more important for the Labour Party to beat the Conservatives in England than maximise the opportunity for silly finger-pointing games with the SNP. Not least because the SNP are much better at it.

  23. @ Mr. Nameless,

    I agree on Burnham, but I have to say that so far the evidence he can overtake Corbyn is weak. He needs to do something impressive and he needs to do it soon.

    Mind you it didn’t help that Harman decided to shoot him in the foot halfway through the race.

    @ Couper 2802,

    unless Scotland really is a hotbad of the hard left, with totally different values to rUK, then Corbyn’s appeal in England could match the SNP’s appeal in Scotland

    I think this is not the case, and our own Allan Christie is the proof.

    Although it’s been charming to see his gradual conversion to anti-austerity and I commend Nicola Sturgeon for bringing it about, he was and I suspect essentially still is an ABL voter. He used to vote Tory for Westminster elections and SNP for Holyrood- he voted SNP this time because he thought it was the best chance of getting rid of his Labour MP, which it was.

    If he were in England I doubt he would suddenly start voting Labour because they chose Corbyn for leader. And I bet there are a lot of Allans in Scotland, not to mention Old Nats. There are also plenty of Coupers, but the SNP’s successful electoral coalition depends on all three of you. The Labour Party cannot by definition built an electoral coalition that includes ABL voters (unfortunately for them England contains quite a few of these), and they can’t harness English nationalism without giving their Scottish seats- and possibly the union itself- up for lost.

    @ Neil A,

    The voice of reason as usual.

    Any chance you want to pay £3 to help us out here? I’m told it’s all the rage amongst Tories these days…

  24. @ Roger Mexico,

    But it’s not “Yes” or “No” to the renegotiation, it’s “Yes to the renegotiation” or “No, Brexit.”

    There is no “Yes to the EU, no to the renegotiation” option; there is no “No, but”. I guess you could hope the EU would treat it like.. every other referendum result they didn’t like in the past ten years, actually… and completely ignore it, but this isn’t like rejecting the Lisbon treaty where a no vote means stasis.

    A “No” is a vote to leave. Ukip and Cameron’s backbenchers won’t allow it to mean anything else.

  25. @Spearmint,

    Quite tempted actually. I don’t wish Labour ill in any way, and the prospect of hegemonic Tory dominance doesn’t appeal to me at all. There’s not a massive difference between my own views and the likes of Liz Kendall (a point that’s not lost on her opponents on Labour’s left, obviously). Problem is, you have to verify your identity to register as a supporter, and that would mean me openly committing a disciplinary offence as I am not permitted to be actively involved in politics.

  26. More importantly, the media won’t allow it. Can you imagine Corbyn or his allies on some sort of Hard Talk interview show trying to explain how their “No” vote isn’t actually a “No” vote. It would be excruciating. And it would tarnish Corbyn’s best asset which is his willingness to talk straight and not hide behind tactics and strategy.

  27. Neil A,

    I bow to your superior knowledge if I’m wrong, but my understanding (from a Labour Party friend who applied for a job with the diplomatic service) is that you can hold party membership but not campaign or promote your views?

    Skullduggery like paying an apolitical acquaintance to do it for you would be out of the question, one assumes.

  28. @Neil A

    I will squeal on you if you do it.

  29. @MrNameless,

    I think the definition is applied fairly haphazardly. I’ve always taken a rather cautious view of how to interpret it (I resigned my Conservative Party membership when I joined). It seems to me that if the purpose of the rule is to prevent people feeling you’ve discriminated against them because of politics, then anything that openly identifies you as partisan (even if its just to the party itself) is not acceptable.

  30. Crazy that when parties discuss issues internally such as the police or criminal justice in general – we cant have serving officers informing the discussion.

  31. Good evening all from yet another very wet day in Giffnock.

    GRAHAM
    Allan Christie
    I fail to see what the SNP can do about it. All the pro-Union parties can reasonably accuse the Nationalists of refusing to accept the democratically expressed will of the people of Scotland clearly expressed at a Referendum on a turnout of 85%
    ____________

    It’s not the SNP who will decide it’s the people and if the SNP do put another indy ref in their manifesto for 2016 then it will be up to the voters to either give the SNP the boot or not.

    I would rather the VoW be delivered and give it a chance than have another indy ref so soon. I was sitting on the fence at least 5 months before the indy ref before I made up my mind to vote Yes.

    If Cameron tried to block another vote (which many legal experts say that’s just wishful thinking) then it will only speed up the process of breaking up the UK.

    With the UK economy doing well at the moment it would be a shame to see it slide back because of constitutional uncertainty on the back of broken promises to the Scottish parliament.

    But indy ref or not, the big issue looming is the EU vote and that’s when i predict the perfect storm for UK politics.

  32. @JimJam,

    You do get a bit of that, but it tends to be officers of senior rank. There’s nothing to stop a police officer speaking frankly, but without party affiliation, about a specific policing issue, but they would be expected to get authority to do so from supervisors and in most cases the person who ends up giving the speech is someone near the top of the chain (or right at the top – see Sara Thornton’s remarks about not turning up at burglaries any more).

    When you look at the mess the Federation got itself into over Plebgate you can sort of see the point of it all.

    However, imagine if Sara Thornton was a paid up member of the Labour Party and this information got out. She’d be immediately accused of scaremongering to try and hurt the government, rather than talking sensibly about police priorities and realities of how policing looks when you get rid of half of your police officers.

  33. SPEARMINT
    .
    @ Couper 2802,

    unless Scotland really is a hotbad of the hard left, with totally different values to rUK, then Corbyn’s appeal in England could match the SNP’s appeal in Scotland
    …………
    I think this is not the case, and our own Allan Christie is the proof.
    Although it’s been charming to see his gradual conversion to anti-austerity and I commend Nicola Sturgeon for bringing it about, he was and I suspect essentially still is an ABL voter. He used to vote
    Tory for Westminster elections and SNP for Holyrood- he voted SNP this time because he thought it was the best chance of getting rid of his Labour MP, which it was
    ____________

    A couple of crossed wires. Peppermint ;-) I was going to tactically vote Tory at the last election if they were best placed to give JM the boot. The last election was also my first UK election in which I voted in but have said on a few occasions I would had probably voted Tory in previous UK elections. I never did like the narrative “a vote for the the SNP would let Labour in” mine was a vote for Labour will let Labour in.

    Like most people I want to see a reduction in welfare but it’s the way in which its been done I find difficult to support along with the broken promises after the indy vote.

    That aside…Yes I would still class myself as a Tartan Tory (AB light) and I disagree with Couper that England will follow Scotland and lend 50% of the vote to Labour under JC. England is more to the right than Scotland and unless the entire population of Romania shunts and shuffles over to England and votes Labour then they have no chance under JC.

    He would make a good stand in if the party supported him and could make headway with the SNP’s support in parliament but at the ballot box he would be stuffed.

  34. @Neil A

    According to today’s reports, in addition to earlier steps, Harriet Harman has disclosed that a new email is being sent to local branches setting out how they can check whether bogus applicants are trying to join the party as registered supporters.

    The obvious step for local parties is to cross reference with canvassing records and establish whether the claimed supporter was recorded as a “Tory” or “Against” in recent years (although I can’t see why that could be done at a national level). If local parties do the job properly, there’s a good chance that you would be weeded out anyway. I understand that the £3 is non-refundable.

  35. #“a vote for the the SNP would let Labour in..# should be let the Tories in

  36. @Phil,

    You’re assuming that I’d talk to any canvasser!

    The closest they might come to outing me would be that my wife decided, apropos of nothing, to join the Tory party after the election and frequently shares stuff from the new MP’s Facebook page. However, no one should assume that married couples vote alike..

  37. @ Phil Haines,

    Isn’t the whole point of the exercise to get people who voted “Tory” or “Against” interested in the Labour Party again, though? How could you differentiate Toby Young from a hypothetical NotAPoliceman Neil A who signs up to vote for the candidate he genuinely feels would make Labour more electable and turn it into a party he’d consider voting for?

    All this worrying about secret motives is nuts, IMO. In an era when so few people bother to join the party they support, the number of people willing to go to the trouble of sabotaging someone else’s internal election has to be in the dozens at best.

  38. Allan Christie

    ‘If Cameron tried to block another vote (which many legal experts say that’s just wishful thinking) then it will only speed up the process of breaking up the UK. ‘

    At the very least Cameron can block a further referendum being held before the early 2020s. Personally I would be happy to see him – and his successors – rule out such a vote being held until the mid- 2030s on the simple basis that Scotland has made a once in a generation decision less than a year ago.In a sense the SNP have become victims of their success last May – in that having won all bar three seats in Scotland the pro- Union parties have only a single seat to lose. That rather reduces any leverage that the Nationalists might expect to have. Had the May election produced a result on the lines of SNP 35 – Labour 20 they would have a lot more now to play with. At the end of the day , what can the SNP do – other than appear impotent?

  39. Police voices on policy?
    In a previous era, the Fabians were used in part to give an organised voice to those not allowed to join a political party and in this case the Labour party.
    Spearmint
    Your point about the energy required may be generally true but not in Scotland where the social media sphere is saturated with cybernats calling for support for Corbyn

  40. I’d be very surprised if Tories for Corbyn is amounting to much… beyond the political bubble most Tory voters couldn’t care less who wins the Labour leadership, and for those that would like to aid a Corbyn win the effort involved in signing up and the inevitable torrent of Labour e-mails that would follow is probably enough to make people think better of the idea.

    Checking registers for whether the person told a canvasser they’d vote Tory seems an odd thing to do to me… that would be rejecting the very group they need to win over.

  41. Coin

    2015 Q2 GDP + 0.7%
    .
    YOY + 2.6% pa

    Meaningless we need the PMI data.

    Serious point Economically is that manufacturing has declined and construction flat-lined while the service sector and personal spending has increase.

    And a question – will this hasten or accelerate interest rate increases and will this have any impact politically?

  42. GRAHAM

    “.In a sense the SNP have become victims of their success last May – in that having won all bar three seats in Scotland the pro- Union parties have only a single seat to lose. That rather reduces any leverage that the Nationalists might expect to have. Had the May election produced a result on the lines of SNP 35 – Labour 20 they would have a lot more now to play with. At the end of the day , what can the SNP do – other than appear impotent?”
    ________

    Your comments are very much like what Scottish Labour (former MP’s) would say and it explains why all but 1 got the boot. You’re acting like a Red Tory. The SNP’s leverage at Westminster does have its limits because Scotland only has 59 out of 650 seats but the real power for the SNP is in Edinburgh where they are directly accountable to the Scottish people and it’s them who will decide how much leverage Scotland will have over her own destiny.

    Yes David Cameron can say no to another Scottish indy ref but that’s a sure way of accelerating the break up of the UK.
    If the full powers that were promised were delivered then the SNP really would put another indy ref into the long grass.

    Lets be clear…I want to give the VoW a chance as do most people in Scotland but that’s not being delivered. Even the 1 MP Labour have in Scotland along with the 1 Lib/Dem agree that this is the case.

  43. BARNEY CROCKETT

    If someone who votes SNP and posts comments online is called a CyberNat then what do we call those from other parties who post online?

    I don’t think SNP supporters are a unique bunch and are the only ones who post comments online….What can we call you? CyberBarney?

  44. Phil Haines
    “He has shown that party modernisation of the sort that Blair championed for 13 years is as brittle as balsa. What message does that have for Cameron, whose modernisation strategy has been much less consistent and committed than Blair’s?”

    Hawthorn
    “Blair got away with it. In fact, that is what all election winning politicians say because it is what the voters want to hear and believe.”

    Jonathan
    “Apart from under Tony Blair the Labour Party hasn’t won a working HOC majority for 50 years.”

    Neil A
    “Elections are won from the centre.”

    and all the rest.

    From 1998-2008 there was the biggest credit bubble in history due to the banks massively lowering the cost of borrowing.

    Talking about politics in that period without taking account of the feelgood factor from people being high on cheap credit is nonsense.

    massive credit bubble = Blair
    not massive credit bubble = not Blair

  45. If the SNP agitate for a second referendum it will be because they expect to win it. It seems odd therefore to suggest that denying them a double-tap referendum will hasten the death of the union.

    There are plenty of clips of SNP politicians (whilst trying to motivate people to vote Yes first time around) stating categorically that Scotland wouldn’t get a second chance for a very long time.

    I don’t think there is much risk to the Tories from denying a referendum in this parliament. It would be dreadful for Labour if they went into the next election as a party considered likely to let the SNP hold a second vote during 2020-2025. I suspect the second referendum (and I agree with the SNP that it’s just a question of timing) won’t be until the 2025-2030 parliament. Even that doesn’t really meet the definition of the “next generation” (unless you’re looking at the average age of motherhood in Camborne) but it would be a respectable interval.

    By 2025 North Sea oil will be much less of a factor, and we’ll be able to see if cultural animosity to the English is sufficient to outweigh potential economic disadvantage.

    Of course, if the UK votes to leave the EU then that creates a much stronger argument for a rethink, but I’m not sure the conditions would be great for the SNP – splitting from an independent UK and then applying for membership of the EU would almost certainly involve Eurozone membership and a number of other integrationist measures that might not appeal.

  46. @Allan Christie

    I think this all rather academic as there isn’t likely to be another referendum until around 2030 anyway.

    I think there are parallels with Quebec but I am less confident that support for independence/ the SNP could fall away even then after a potential 2nd narrow loss and Scotland could remain divided down the middle for a very long time.

    I think Ian Murray has done an excellent job on scrutinising FFA as Shadow Scottish secretary but it’ll still be difficult to move the debate away from constitutional issues where they are useful for the SNP to be on the agenda.

    I don’t think Labour’s opposition to the SNP is any worse than their misguided 2007-11 opposition but as long as the SNP has a majority, real relevance will be difficult.

  47. Thatcher certainly did not win three elections from the centre!

  48. It looks like Burnham’s campaign is sinking… didn’t get into the last two in a poll the Mirror claim to have got their hands on and apparently out first in the Holborn and St. Pancras CLP nomination (which Corbyn won). I guess he must be suffering from the old problem of being the front-runner in a leadership contest. Also, his flip-flopping can’t have helped.

  49. Mr Jones

    The tax revenues from the bubble allowed the circle to be squared until it all went Pete Tong.

    Osborne is no better and I expect a similar fate for him.

  50. Jim Jam
    The financial press will gress think US interest rates will go up soon to be followed in the UK but with serious problems for EZ. There will also be, they say upward pressure on some emerging economies like Brazil.

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