There are three polls in the Sunday papers today – GB polls by YouGov and Opinium, and a new Scottish poll by Survation.

YouGov in the Sunday Times have tables here. Topline voting intention is CON 35%, LAB 38%, LDEM 7%, UKIP 12%, GRN 4%. The main part of the poll deals with Ed Miliband’s image, following his speech at the start of the week. As we know from countless other polls, Miliband’s ratings on best PM, being up to the job being a strong leader and so on are poor. The questions today were prodding at whether that is indeed something to do with “image” or even “looks” (I say “prodding” – I don’t think it’s really possible to answer the question conclusively).

Asked whether each man has the right policies or looks the part of PM Ed Miliband narrowly leads Cameron on policies: 38% think Ed Miliband has the right policies, compared to 32% who think David Cameron has the right policies. On looking and sounding like a Prime Minister 57% think Cameron looks the part, only 13% think Ed Miliband does. Of course, it easier to look like a Prime Minister when you actually ARE Prime Minister, but that doesn’t explain the gulf between the men’s ratings – YouGov also sometimes ask a question about the opposition leader “looking like a PM in waiting”. Ed Miliband tends to score around 20% or so, when Cameron was leader of the opposition he scored up in the forties.

Ed Miliband’s negative rating do not seem to be due to physical attractiveness, it’s not a case of Miliband being “too ugly” as John Humphrys once put it, as quite frankly neither of them are seen as attractive. Only 6% think Ed Miliband is attractive, but only 16% think David Cameron is. However asked if they physically look like a credible national leader Ed Miliband scores only 15%, David Cameron scores 55%. Clearly looking like a credible leader is not the same as looking physically attractive.

Does this matter at all? Well, the large majority of people say it SHOULDN’T matter – 80% said it shouldn’t matter much or shouldn’t matter at all when it comes to how the public vote at a general election. However, in practice people think it DOES – 55% think it actually does matter a lot or a fair amount. I suspect they are correct. I doubt very many people consciously sit down and think “I don’t think they’d make a good Prime Minister because they are funny looking”, but psychologically we all have many prejudices and biases about people based upon what they look and sound like. Unavoidably our views of politicians will be skewed by our gut impressions of their appearance – and the less closely people follow politics the more important those gut instincts and prejudices probably are.

And, my usual caveat about the Ed Miliband paradox: Labour are still in the lead. If people do think Ed Miliband doesn’t look like a leader, he hasn’t suddenly started looking that way; he’s unlikely to start looking less “leadery” as the election approaches. It’s already there in the price and it hasn’t stopped Labour being ahead in the polls. That doesn’t mean his image isn’t a negative for Labour (they could be further ahead without the problem), but it does mean Miliband as leader is not incompatible with Labour winning. The question, which I don’t think is currently answerable (except through wishful thinking one way or the other), is whether or not public perceptions of the opposition leader may become more salient as the election approaches and it becomes not just a judgement on the government, but a choice between two alternative governments.

Moving on, Opinium’s fortnightly poll for the Observer also has a three point Labour lead. Topline figures are CON 32%(+1), LAB 35%(+1), LDEM 7%(-2), UKIP 15%(-2), GRN 5%. Tabs are here.

Finally Survation have a new Scottish poll, which shows very little change on their previous. Topline referendum voting intentions are YES 40%(-1), NO 46%(nc), Don’t knows 14%(+1). Excluding don’t knows it’s YES 47%, NO 53%, the same as Survation’s last poll. Tabs are here

The poll was conducted between Wednesday and Friday so while it isn’t the first “post-Commonwealth Games” poll, it’s the first poll where we can really look for a Commonwealth Games effect. Thus far there’s no obvious sign of one.


206 Responses to “Sunday’s polls – YouGov, Opinium and Survation”

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  1. Indeed, oldnat. Indeed.

  2. AW
    I think when Cameron was scoring 40 as PM in waiting, it
    was so clear in the polls, with Labour down in the 20s, that he *was* the PM in waiting, so I think we need to temper our judgements about that one.

    I also think that the more exposure the party leader issue is given, the more potentially beneficial it is to Miliband, as he gets more exposure, as long as he has the sense to deal with it effectively.

    Pity a Scot could not win the road racing, but were those were real men and women out there today, do we not agree? What guts.

  3. Interesting our House of Lords has now reached 800 Strong.

    After that Other Wonderful Bastion of Democracy the Chinese Peoples Assembly The House of Lords is the Largest Parliamentary Chamber in the World.

    The Lok Sabha the House of the People At The Indian Parliament representing an Electorate approximately 18 Times that of the UK manages to scrape by with 545 Members only a Third of the Combined total of the Lords and Commons!

  4. Howard

    Those cyclists were awesome.

    I’m unconcerned about who won the gold medal. It would have madse no difference to our standings in the “alternative” medal table developed by the New Zealand statistics office.

    http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/population/estimates_and_projections/commonwealth-games.aspx

    Kiribati would still have topped the gold medal table. New Zealand would still have beaten us to 3rd place, and Wales would still have been in 8th place ahead of England.

    :-) (for the avoidance of doubt!)

  5. @Graham @Starry Living in a LD/Lab constituency (currently held by a LD MP) we have seen huge swings to Labour. In May local elections the LD’s were slaughtered. There was some Green advance but most of the Green activists I have spoken to tell me they intend to vote Labour in the GE. I am in London were Labour has made particular gains but I think the Lab/LD battle is going very much against the LDs. In Con/LD battles the story maybe different.

  6. Whatever the polls say, the Sturgeon spectacles, rose-tinted or otherwise, appear to be claiming the games for Yes, according to The Observer…

  7. ADGE3

    The things to remember first and foremost is that RM is an absolute Thatcherite – an economic liberal who believes in privatisation and no restrictions on business.

    Secondly, he is a backer of winners. He wants to be associated and have influence with the successful candidates/parties.

    By 1994, Major was pissing the NI hierarchy off – criticism of the so called ‘bastards’, Clarke and Heseltine holding increasing influence within the government and the ridiculous back to basics rubbish, that’s why the Sun supported Redwood in the 1995 leadership election.

    After this was lost, it was clear that both the heartland readership were not going to back the Tories in the way that they had in the previous 3 elections, and at the same time, RM had had lunch with Maggie in which she told him that Blair ‘wouldn’t let Britain down’. RM was therefore satisfied that there would be no return to ‘Old’ Labour under Blair and Brown.

    The switch wasn’t popular with many and nobody thought that it would continue for so long. RM couldn’t be persuaded to back Howard in 2005 because he thought he couldn’t win.

    As for the Iraq war, there is no way that [NewsUK] would ever admit that it was the wrong course of action; RM is a hawk who believes in military intervention. He associates strongly with the Tea Party and was disappointed at the 2012 election result, being a particular fan of Romney running mate Paul Ryan.

    Any Labour leader to the left of Blair will not be supported by RM and the older staff particularly would probably be unwilling to back ANY Labour leader again. There is no pretension that Cameron is a true Thatcherite but he will get full backing, is expected to win and subsequently be expected to deliver in the way that Major never did.

  8. Guymonde

    I saw the Observer headline on Twitter, but on their website, I could only find this.

    http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/aug/02/nicola-sturgeon-commonwealth-games-confidence-boost-scotland-yes-independence

    Is that the same story that you were referring to? In which case, the sub-editor may have taken some liberties with her actual words.

    Quelle surprise!

  9. Guymonde

    I saw the Observer headline on Twitter, but on their website, I could only find this.

    http
    ://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/aug/02/nicola-sturgeon-commonwealth-games-confidence-boost-scotland-yes-independence

    Is that the same story that you were referring to? In which case, the sub-editor may have taken some liberties with her actual words.

    Quelle surprise!

  10. Starry

    In Con/LD marginals, I would expect a major Lab/Green boost. Then we will see if that gain is enough to get close to Con. However, in Lab/LD marginals, I can’t see many Lib Dems choosing Lab. Why not choose that already?

    Well luckily enough we have Lord Ashcroft to find these things out for us. As far as the Lab-L/D marginals goes it was (inevitably) a small (four) and rather odd set including a potential five-way marginal (Norwich South which the Lib Dems only won with 29%) and a possible three-way in Bradford East[1]. But the votes of those who voted Lib Dem in 2010 went as follows:

    Con 5% (6%)

    Lab 27% (28%)

    L/D 33% (26%)

    UKIP 6% (9%)

    Green 11% (10%)

    Based on a sample of 733 who gave a GE preference. The first figure is in response to the Thinking specifically about your own constituency and the candidates who are likely to stand there version of the question, the one in brackets the initial, non-contextual VI.

    As you can see the Conservatives are the last people to benefit from the Lib Dem collapse. In fact their nett vote actually goes down from 2010 in three of these (it goes up slightly in Brent Central where the Lib Dem MP is not standing again).

    In the Lab-Con ultra-marginals[3] the

    Con 12% (11%)

    Lab 32% (28%)

    Lib Dem 17% (16%)

    UKIP 13% (13%)

    Green 9% (10%)[4]

    Again Labour are the big beneficiaries with the Conservatives doing pretty badly, even though these are seats they already hold. Clearly few who voted Lib Dem last time want to move to their coalition partners even in such seats. If you compare these percentages with those we see in YouGov polls across GB it’s clear that Labour (and UKIP) is doing better than average in these marginals at picking up Lib Dem votes while the Tories are just doing average.

    [1] As with Norwich South an almost accidental Lib Dem win, in part because of a big swing to the Conservatives possibly because of ethnic factors. It would be interesting to see if David Ward’s comments on Gaza had any effect on VI, in part because of the high Muslim vote (37%) but also because voters may like an MP who is seen to against the Westminster consensus.

    [2] It’s interesting that the weighted figures show more people saying that they voted for Labour than Lib Dems even though the actual results must be the other way around (it’s even more dramatic in the unweighted figures). Presumably the idea is that false recall, especially in a telephone poll, means that you have to adjust your targets accordingly.

    [3] As discussed before chance and the extra addition of two UKIP targets to the 12 make this set rather more UKIP-friendly than generally in marginals. Although the percentage of 2010 was smaller, the bigger number of seats meant that the sample was actually larger (1038) again upweighted quite a bit, especially in comparative terms.

    [4] The nett increase with the likely candidates question is because more people move from Don’t Know etc.

  11. @chrislane1945
    Thank you for rating my post so highly. After this high rating the only way is down for me.

    There are very, very good posts on this site – regular posters who continually deliver the goods, interesting. The newspapers are several notches below this site. Who needs the newspapers when you can read this wonderful site?

    I am a very low level poster, but I have noted your posts for example. I believe that you are right wing in your outlook. I am not committed to any party, but I think that proportional representation would please a lot of people.

    Anyway, thanks again for your kind comment.

  12. @AW “when supermarkets put things on the middle shelf they sell better, that margarine sells better when its dyed yellow. Yet if you asked people how they choose their brand of margarine people would say cost or taste or whatever not, “degree of yellowness and if it’s on the middle shelf”.”

    Let me offer an alternative view. There must be many people who shop in supermarkets who are in a hurry. Supermarkets change their layouts; husbands shop if their wives can’t, etc. I know my reaction is not “which margarine” but “where the *** have they put the margarine this week.”
    You then notice first what is at eye level, or a little below, on the middle shelves, only looking at top and bottom if you can’t find some obscure sauce on your list, while yellow is a very eye-catching colour, which is why ambulances are yellow and green, and bright yellow cars stand out.
    In any case, margarine is sold in yellow wrappers, its own colour only evident when it’s opened at home.

  13. @Roger Mexico

    I live adjacent to Bradford East.

    I think that Labour will pick a PCC of Asian ethnicity, with view on Gaza like those of David Ward.

    Therefore, I think his position on Gaza will be neutralised.

  14. @ Crossbat (if you are around)

    Any Villa mates of yours going to be part of the churn to Labour now that Karen Brady’s been made a Tory peer?

  15. Dave
    I have expertise in supermarkets. AW was referring to the fact of what margarine actually looks like before they add the yellow.

    If they didn’t do that, it would only sell once, one packet, even if in a yellow wrapper.

    In my young days I ate bread and dripping with no problem at all. Mind, also, I drew birds at the kitchen table with Grandma (etc. etc).

  16. Shev11

    I think CB11 will splutter when he reads your post (think St Andrews).

  17. Howard,
    What a lovely picture that evokes ,you and your Grandmother drawing birds
    Together.Also as we all know homemade strawberry jam is a dull brownish
    Colour but that would never sell,hence the red colour additive.

  18. @OLDNAT

    Yes, the same article, and I admit I took a slight liberty like the sub-ed :-)

    However it seems she did say:
    “I think it will inevitably leave a feelgood factor. I think confidence not only in Glasgow but across the country is high.
    “I think there is a very significant momentum behind the ‘yes’ campaign and I feel it everywhere I go in the country. The momentum is with us and as we come out of the Commonwealth Games at the weekend that is us into the final strait of the campaign and that momentum will be visible.”

    So a bit of spin at least.

  19. Pressman

    The intransigence of your or rather what you describe as RM’s position does put members of the progressive political parties in the countries of UK (of which RM is not a citizen) in something of a dilemma. The residual non-RM newspapers do not operate on the assumption that their overriding mission is to secure the political triumph of one strand of opinion – particularly a strand which is, and never has been, held by more than a minority of our citizens.

    I am afraid it does immediately raise the question for the political parties representing the majority of voters of whether RM as a non-UK citizen should be allowed to own and dominate such a large chunk of our media, particularly after the hacking scandals, or whether this decayed media Empire should be dispersed to restore press freedom and plurality. The more you express RM in these terms, particularly on a site about polling and public opinion, the more the question will be raised. We are not frightened of you….

  20. Ann

    The colour of your jam depends on the quality of the strawberries. Mine is an appetizing deep red. Unfortunately I have never successfully made blue jam but the search goes on.

  21. Guymonde

    A politician using a wee bit of spin? I can’t believe it! :-)

  22. @Howard
    Was he? He wrote about “[to] choose their *brand* of margarine people would say cost or taste or whatever not, “degree of yellowness”
    I’m sure what you say is true, but then that implies AW believes that people stick to the brand of margarine which looks nice and yellow when they get it home, not what it tastes like, and look for the appropriate wrapper next time.
    Goat’s butter is in a silver wrapper, and on the top shelf, but then it’s a specialist item as well as a bit pale. Easy to spot if you want it, though.
    I still sometimes eat and enjoy bread and dripping, but today’s fashion for beef is very lean.

  23. catmanjeff

    I live adjacent to Bradford East.

    I think that Labour will pick a PCC of Asian ethnicity, with view on Gaza like those of David Ward.

    Therefore, I think his position on Gaza will be neutralised

    I would imagine that would happen as well and Ashcroft’s figures showed the Lib Dems losing to Labour 45% to 23% and UKIP (who didn’t even stand in 2010) beating the Conservatives.

    The only thing that makes me wonder is the fact that Labour haven’t already selected a candidate. Given that they lost Bradford West in the by-election due to poor candidate selection and a history of clan politics that meant most people, of whatever background, felt excluded, you’d think this was something not to be left to last minutes. Apart from anything else against ‘personality’ candidates you need time to get someone established. And yet neither West nor East appear to have candidates chosen, though apparently West will be an all-women shortlist.

    If they are planning to parachute candidates in at the last minute, you can quite easily see it backfiring.

  24. @ Welsh Borderer,

    The residual non-RM newspapers do not operate on the assumption that their overriding mission is to secure the political triumph of one strand of opinion

    What about the Guardian or the Mirror? What about the Telegraph and the Mail, for that matter? I’d argue all the papers view that as their mission, they’re just lobbying on behalf of different (only marginally different, in the case of the Telegraph and the Mail) strands of opinion.

    (The Guardian is unique in that they seem to have responded to the realisation that no party backs their precise strand of opinion by wandering blindly around in circles bumping into things, instead of taking the sensible approach of identifying the party that is closest and backing them like the other papers do. But they’re still lobbying their readers.)

    Murdoch is special not because his papers have an editorial line, but because he seems to view himself not only as a lobbyist before the election but as a puppeteer afterward.

    Although this desire for influence is increasingly difficult to reconcile with his hardline ideological positions. I’m pretty sure in the US he has no influence with the Democrats at all by this point; they seem to view Fox News as a comedy network. And he’s moving in the same direction with Labour. There’s a little residual fear left from the New Labour era but a Miliband win would put that to bed forever.

  25. Welsh Borderer

    I’m not here to argue whether RM should or should not be ‘dispersed’ but lest we forget, there are several other news papers that always back the Tories and seek influence.

    The latest personal ratings should be of major concern for EM; Cameron will benefit by some sort international incident or historic shambles that needs apologising for. That’s what he’s good at and the public will question Miliband’s ability in these situations. [NewsUK will want to] keep stressing that the election is a straight choice between the two men and forget the side shows. Be distracted by the side show and you are letting miliband in.

  26. RMJI,
    Tried blueberries?I am afraid the quality of the strawberries has little to do with
    It in my experience.But who am I to argue?
    Welsh Borderer,
    Great post at 8.02.

  27. Just as an aside from the leader polling, none of the pollsters have indicated to their interviewees (online or otherwise) that the party leaders are to be seen as ‘leading the country’.

    I see that some here actually think that is what the PM does, but it’s not how I see it. Unless I am alone, i just wonder how the voters see this. Perhaps a question on this aspect could be revealing. Its wording needs to be very careful and options need to be provided.

    On the doorstep, I found (I don’t do this any more) that people here think in parties, not personalities, although the latter colour their attitudes to some extent.

  28. @Roger Mexico

    I agree that Labour is late in Bradford East is complacent not having a PCC yet.

    Given that a failure of Labour to take this seat would be abysmal for them, you would have thought their number 10 target would have a candidate and be campaigning hard now.

    I don’t imagine a repeat of Bradford West is likely though. That by-election was won by an extraordinary and probably unique candidate, and Respect have had serious difficulties locally.

    The Conservatives and Lib Dems have no chance, as they are deeply unpopular in northern cities at the moment. I predict an unenthusiastic Labour win.

  29. Correction

    @Roger Mexico

    I agree that Labour in Bradford East are complacent in not having a PCC yet.

    Given that a failure of Labour to take this seat would be abysmal for them, you would have thought their number 10 target would have a candidate and be campaigning hard now.

    I don’t imagine a repeat of Bradford West is likely though. That by-election was won by an extraordinary and probably unique candidate, and Respect have had serious difficulties locally.

    The Conservatives and Lib Dems have no chance, as they are deeply unpopular in northern cities at the moment. I predict an unenthusiastic Labour win.

  30. @ Pressman,

    I’m not convinced the latest international incident is playing in Cameron’s favour. Nor that Syria would have done, if Parliament had let him have his way and he’d gone to war with Assad.

    Cameron is indeed very good at looking prime ministerial in a crisis or a tragedy, but a) he’s been very good at that for four years and b) he’s badly out of step with the public and even with his own party in terms of his interventionism. There have been no shortage of international crises in this Parliament, and the only ones that boosted Tory poll ratings were confrontations with Europe. And even those gains were very short lived.

    Yet it’s clear from the Syria incident that Miliband gets no credit for taking- or even forcing the Government to comply- with the more popular position, so I doubt the bickering over Gaza will help him either.

    Anyone hoping that either leader is going to get an election boost from an international crisis is indulging in some very wishful thinking. You can’t get someone to invade the Falklands every time you need to win an election, you know.

  31. Ann in Wales

    The problem with fruit is that it rarely behaves in a way that it’s name would suggest. In this regard it is much like our political parties. Blueberries produce a reddish dark jam without a hint of blue. I wish it were otherwise.

  32. Whereas blaeberries produce a red colour that is dark. Very different.

  33. “Pity a Scot could not win the road racing, but were those were real men and women out there today, do we not agree?”

    No – if you watched very carefully, you would clearly see that they were, in fact, plastic.

  34. Alec

    They tried cardboard ones, but they couldn’t cope with a Glasgow summer.

  35. @Oldnat – I saw that. Birmingham was apparently experimenting with figures made of ice. Fools!

  36. Alec

    Saw that. Impressive idea, but only if they had been commemorating the deaths currently in the Middle East as a result of politicians fostering hate.

    As opposed to the deaths 100 years ago caused by politicians fostering hate.

  37. Not sure if this was picked up, but Friday saw the July PMI survey release for manufacturing. Still reasonable growth at 55.4, but a hefty fall on the month of nearly two points. The index is now at it’s lowest for a year. All sectors slowed, but the fall in the consumer goods sector was the biggest.

    This is one of those funny figures that could be argued either way. It’s still a good news story, but the rate of fall is rapid – another month or two like this, and suddenly the growth evaporates.

    What is interesting also is the commentary. Markit still see these as positive results, but cite worries over economic sluggishness in Europe and the impact of the Ukraine crisis, saying
    “…but the worry is that the combined effects of expected policy tightening, heightened economic uncertainty and sluggish trade could mean manufacturing growth could suddenly weaken more than expected. Policymakers will therefore be hoping to see service sector PMI numbers offsetting any export led weakness in
    manufacturing.”

    This is the first time for a long time we’ve seen negative thoughts creep into Markit’s commentary, and the fact they are hoping for continued service led growth when all surveys are suggesting households are feeling more squeezed again is a worry.

  38. @Oldnat – indeed. I was rather shot down (probably an ill advised description) a few days ago for daring to suggest both sides in the Gaza conflict were wrong. It just seems to be one of those conflicts where perfectly normal people jump in both feet first on one side or the other.

    My central position was to ask the question as to whether each side actually believed what they were doing would help them achieve the aims they profess to promote.

    In my view, suicide bombing buses and firing rockets more or less randomly into Israel won’t help Palestinians achieve a stable and viable state, and blockading Gaza and periodically butchering hundreds of civilians won’t bring peace and security to Israel.

    Indeed, the fact that both sides remain doing these things after all this time rather proves my point. I’m just so grateful I don’t live there.

  39. Alec

    While I was reading your post, I was also listening to the sanctimonious crap from Huw Edwards on the BBC about tomorrow’s WWI stuff.

    That the then politicians are also all dead doesn’t make them any better.

  40. OLD NAT.
    Good Evening to you, Sir. We are not allowed cr*p.

    ADGE: what is right wing?

  41. chrislane1945

    Constipation then?

  42. In that YG poll were the questions beginning “Which of the following countries do you think has the ……” designed to measure the willingness of panel members to answer ludicrous questions about foreigners?

  43. The funniest analysis I ever heard about the Prime Minister compared the role to that of Alan Sugar on The Apprentice – firing people and making the headline remarks while actually doing relatively little. Meanwhile those on the other side of the table take the substantive decisions, before in 95% of cases leaving with their tails between their legs.

    The Scotland polling is a LOT closer than I had expected it to be at this stage of the campaign.

    That said, even allowing for Salmond’s charisma and the fact that he will probably use the hope vs fear tagline to good effect, I would still prefer to be in Darling’s shoes for the debate. Darling is relying on the known, whereas Salmond is relying on undecided voters being convinced that his assertions about the future are realistic enough to justify the risk of breaking away.

  44. @ Alec

    I’m just so grateful I don’t live there.
    ————–
    I have had the experience of living & working in Israel. It increased my understanding of the conflict immensely.

  45. ChrisHornet

    In any political debate, the participants prefer to be ahead in the polls! :-)

  46. WES
    …apart from the 40%+ planning to vote for them, is that, Shaun?

    How can it be 40 percent plus when 35 percent don’t get off their backsides and vote?Think you may have those sums wrong.

  47. Shaun

    55% of disagreements are based on semantic differences. The other 63% are based on using percentages of different populations and comparing them.

  48. @Alec

    ‘Not sure if this was picked up, but Friday saw the July PMI survey release for manufacturing’ etc

    But Alec the Markit manufacturing numbers for the Q2 averaged 57 and Markit said this meant robust growth, the official figures from the ONS said 0.2% growth over the quarter – almost no growth at all. Markit were wrong in their prediction. you can’t rely on them to predict what manufacturing is actually doing.

    Also I note the CBI industrial trends for the Q2 also predicted fast growth in manufacturing – they were wrong too. – another survey you can’t rely on at the moment

    If organisations are going to produce surveys, they have to be valid, they can’t just rely on the ‘stopped clock’ effect and the hope that everyone forgets the surveys when the proper figures come out.

  49. SPEARMINT
    “Anyone hoping that either leader is going to get an election boost from an international crisis is indulging in some very wishful thinking.”

    Taking the election of the EC president and the Syria intervention as examples, neither may have caused much of a bounce, lasting or not, for either Cameron or EM, but how would they count, do you think, in consistent support for their parties’ positions on UK policy towards the EU and towards military interventionism?
    I’ld say the consistent “social democrat” VI for Labour is based on a body of opinion among tribal and switched LD voters which is clearly divided from the Conservative position on both issues. Aren’t crises occasions for judgement making which reinforce rather than determine these elements in VI?

  50. CBI report that ?UK’S?small factories hired at the fastest rate on record during the three months to July, .
    The latest report on small and medium-sized manufacturers shows that the businesses took on more new employees during the quarter than in any period since their records began, 26 years ago..

    And this despite a flat export performance.

    Much is made of the trend in “average pay” & its alleged political consequences.

    I wonder what the political effect of the continuing growth in UK jobs will be come next year.?

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