Ipsos MORI’s monthly political monitor is out, with topline figures of CON 27%(-3), LAB 40%(-2), LDEM 11%(+4), UKIP 13%(+4). It suggests a boost for the Lib Dems and UKIP in the aftermath of Eastleigh, but little difference in the Labour lead (most of MORI’s polls in the last few months have shown this degree of lead).

MORI also have some economic questions in advance of the budget. George Osborne’s approval rating remains strongly negative – 60% are dissatisfied with how he is doing compared to only 27% who approve. As with most recent polls, MORI show Labour and the Conservatives pretty much neck-and-neck on the economy. 26% think that Labour have the best policies, 27% the Conservatives. Asked if a Labour government under Miliband and Balls would do better or worse than the current government at running the economy 26% think they’d do a better job, 31% a worse job and 38% think they’d do much the same.

Full tabs are here.


286 Responses to “Ipsos MORI/Standard – CON 27, LAB 40, LD 11, UKIP 13”

1 2 3 4 6
  1. @Peter Cairns

    Sorry to duplicate your post.

    Surprised he was still.an MP after what happened last time.

    Re:Falkirk – on a low turnout the SNP could probably take it. But does the SNP have any history in Falkirk?

  2. One thing to consider about a move to the right by tories(although I would prefer another term since it seems a slander upon real right wing thought) in order to see off a ukip challange is that although it would be bad news in the long term for the tories for individual mps it might make all the difference this time around. The interests of the party and the individual mps may be quite divergent

  3. RAF

    The Holyrood constituency of Falkirk West was held by Denis Canavan (now leader of the Yes campaign) in 1999 & 2003. Taken by SNP in 2005, held by them in 2011.

    Falkirk East was taken by SNP from Lab in 2011.

    History is there, but applying Holyrood voting to Westminster in a GE is unwise. In a by election (which won’t happen) anything can happen.

  4. RAF

    I posted the equivalent results for the Macbethian seats, but auto mud has taken a scunner against them!

  5. Auto mod takes no exception to being described as “auto mud”, I see. Obviously it knows itself!

  6. The Tories only chance is to stick with Cameron and position themselves in the centre. Changing their leader would merely make them look weak and divided. Their best chance is to ride their current problems and hope the economic situation improves.

  7. Re:Dementia

    My nan has now completely lost the ability to recall things even 30 seconds ago. But the worse thing by far is that she has also lost the ability to reason. She doesn’t know if it’s day or night time etc. As a result, even simple tasks like making a cup of tea or making her bed are now beyond her. She needs 24 hour supervision.

    My parents are currently pretty much on the point of breaking down. The only thing that keeps them going is that my sister and I help to look after her so they can go out. Despite being only 30, I don’t have a job, as I have mentioned a few times on this forum. This is because I am her carer – I basically sit at home, chat to her, and just generally keep an eye on her and keep her company. This allows them to go out sometimes to the supermarket etc. but they still get very little time together despite being in their 60s themselves. It’s extra stressful because she constantly repeats herself and she sometimes thinks we have kidnapped her from her parents (despite being 92 this May).

    I am extremely grateful that we still have her….but I’d be lying (even though I am deeply ashamed to feel this way) that I am often caught in two minds….on the one hand, I love her so much that the thought of her not being here anymore would be unbearable….but on the other hand, I think of what a better retirement my parents would lead if she weren’t. Plus, on a purely personal level, I would be able to get a job and not worry about potentially leaving home if I ever choose to, or having to leave my parents with her during the day. But I love her and she has lived with us and been such a big part of my life for years, so I would rather have her and be miserable than not have her as, although my life would in theory be better, I’d still be miserable. It feels like I can’t win either way.

  8. RAF

    The Holyrood constituency of Falkirk West was held by Denis Canavan (now leader of the Yes campaign) in 1999 & 2003. Taken by SNP in 2005, held by them in 2011.

  9. RAF

    Falkirk East was taken by SNP from Lab in 2011.

  10. RAF
    History is there, but applying Holyrood voting to Westminster in a GE is often inappropriate. In a by election (which won’t happen) anything can happen.

  11. RAF

    History is there, but applying Holyrood voting to Westminster in a GE is often inappropriate.

  12. RAF

    Drawing some conclusion about the inappropriateness of applying results from different elections to different scenarios, appears to cause difficulties for the auto mod!

  13. Anthony

    Please improve your system.

  14. Tories lost a council seat in Runnymead Surrey on Thursday to UKIP evening ; and another to an independent.

  15. @R Huckle

    Indeed, Tories are collapsing.

    http://www.englishelections.org.uk/england/lby/

    They haven’t won a district or borough by election since January. They are losing elections they last won with over 40% of the vote last time round – Foxhills went to UKIP, Aldwick West went to Lib Dems according to twitter.

    May elections are not looking good for the Tories.

  16. AmbivalentSupporter
    “The Tories only chance is to stick with Cameron and position themselves in the centre. Changing their leader would merely make them look weak and divided. Their best chance is to ride their current problems and hope the economic situation improves.”

    You are absolutely right – known as “going down with the ship” and much the most decent thing to do. We will remember them well.

  17. TINGED FRINGE
    “Our views of policies are based not on a detailed understanding of the issues, but on crude impressions and heuristics.”
    Much of the comment here is on policies, that is, as set out by the Government, and more particularly as proposed, or absent, in any agenda proposed by Labour, of by EM.
    The reality of the electorate’s understanding of policy, I suggest, is not “a detailed understanding of the issues” or “crude impressions and heuristics” whatever they are – but rather the knowledge and understanding they draw from their everyday life and that of their families and workplace organisations and colleagues. This is derived not from what politicians or the government says or what the press says about what they say, but rather from an experience and accumulated understanding and peception going on over a long enough period for them to put two and two together: for example, the impact of immigration, the role of the EU labour market legislation in this area, and their job and earnings and that of their families and workmates; or the benefits they or their wives and daughters may have derived from improved working rights of women. (Two issues that might have an influence in VI in the forthcoming EU elections)
    Perceptions of policies or practice by the parties would therefore, IMV, be likely to reflect the likely social and economic benefits of participation in, or fine-tuning of, economics and working rights and their consistency in relation to personal needs or the needs of bodies of opinion and social action – those, for example, of traders, housewives, work forces, civil servants, carers, teachers. Rather than crude impressions, it may be a quite detailed and subtle and various appreciation of the dovetailing of party policies and practice in government with wider European and global economics, that has determined a generation of voting in favour of a social market economy and a socialist position in relation to the distrubution of wealth and the loss of control and greed of financial institutions which electorates associate with neo-liberal and capitalist laissez-faire.

  18. Latest YouGov / The Sun results 14th March – CON 30%, LAB 42%, LD 11%, UKIP 11%; APP -35

  19. @John Pilgrim

    “The reality of the electorate’s understanding of policy, I suggest, is not “a detailed understanding of the issues” or “crude impressions and heuristics” whatever they are – but rather the knowledge and understanding they draw from their everyday life and that of their families and workplace organisations and colleagues.”

    For the first time ever, I am not sure that you are right on a matter of some substance. Obviously the public base their VI on their experience but it is on their ;interpreted experience’ and the question for me is where they get their interpretation from.

    Economically, for example, the public have had a much better time under labour than under the coalition. However they ‘fairly uniformly believe that labour is rubbish at economics, and this seems to me to have a lot to do with the messages put out by Osborne, Cameron and the press.

    The Conservatives’ own reputation for economic competence recently took a hammering from the omni-shambles, And this was despite the fact that most people probably didn’t notice a change in the price of pasties and were not affected by the top rate of tax.

    I suspect in fact that I have misinterpreted your view and am attacking a position you do not hold. Could you rephrase in a way that I can understand and hopefully accept?

  20. CHARLES
    Good of you to be as tolerant of the no doubt poorly expresed view I was trying to get across.
    What I meant was that the electorate’s response to statements of policy by Labour may be less important in forming their voting intentions than their longer term experience and understanding of the effects both of past UK government policies and the practice of government, and of wider policies, including those of the EU. A social market, in which some controls, such as workers’ rights and fair taxation, has become generalised in European political and economic development, is reflected in recent electoral results throughout Europe, very well reported by Vergilio. I think it is a long term change which has taken place. It has been strengthened by losses caused through the behaviour of financial institutions, and of people priviledged by the system, which, rightly or wrongly, voters believe is associated with neo-liberal economic policies and with the right.
    Ed’s limited and gradualist interventions in policy debates have, in my view, not been tactical, but reflect his and his party;s views on what is happening in global economic and particularly in labour and demographic movements, including in this country. So, differentials in labour cost of immigrant and domestic labour and thus in employment of unskilled UK workers matter, but not as much as the language, educational, skills and social basis of the integration of immigrant communities, which would dissipate long-term inequality. “Pre-distributive” human resource development may be more effective in competing with low labour-cost emergent economies than any protectionism or outright trade war.
    I think we can expect more along those lines, but it won’t, in my view be directed to electoral tactics so much as preparatory to governnent. The election will be won on the broader playing field of a popular rejection of trickle down economics, wealth retention by a glutted private sector, and associated institutions of priviledge, and of the common ground of the potential for a fair and fairly governed society.

  21. @TINGEDFRINGE

    Interesting detail from the Ipsos Mori poll –

    Half the sample (482 weighted, so warning on figures) were asked

    “People have different ideas about the best way of dealing with Britain’s economic difficulties. Which of the following do you most agree with?”

    Two options
    “Britain has a debt problem, built up over many years, and we have got to deal with it. If we don’t, interest rates will soar. That’s why tackling the deficit and keeping interest rates low should be our top priority.” 52%

    “Without growth in our economy, we are not getting the deficit down and are borrowing more.
    We need more Government spending on investment to kick-start our economy and a temporary cut in taxes to support growth” 41%

    ———————

    Now this is more like it.

    A polling question that acknowledges that growth is a means of reducing the deficit…

  22. John Pilgrim
    Couldn’t disagree with you more. But I’m not going to get in to the discussion with you – the quote was from AW and not me.

  23. AMBIVALENTSUPPORTER
    The Tories only chance is to stick with Cameron and position themselves in the centre.

    ————–

    The issue with this is that it appears to be the case thus far that you get two-for-the-price-of-one with Cameron. In that you also get Osborne. ..

  24. TINGED FRINGE
    ‘ the quote was from AW and not me.”
    Thanks for the clarification – I’ld be happy to hear from either source what you mean by “heuristics”. “Gobbledygook” perhaps? I write as a hardened practitioner.

  25. @:AmbivalentSupporter – ” …she sometimes thinks we have kidnapped her from her parents”

    Bless her, she obviously loved her parents and still misses them.

    As for the Conservatives positioning themselves in the centre, the problem is that was the strategy of Cameron at the last election and it failed to win a majority. Ashcroft has looked at the numbers and doesn’t see the point of investing again in marginal seats – voters there just won’t be buying it again.

    Centre-right MPs are not in a majority within the party – and they themselves are not at all happy with the new Crosby inspired direction – in Easteigh it was basically to out-UKIP UKIP – and voters weren’t buying that either. Staying the course with Cameron could see votes leaching away to right and centre.

    Changing leader is the way forward to a rappochment with UKIP – the gamble then would be that campaigning heavily on immigration/Europe type dog whistle themes (as Howard did in 2005) might succeed where it failed before… in dragging the centrist voter righwards.

  26. I don’t think many outside the Westminster village see Cameron as ‘centrist’. He talks the talk, but his actions are rather more rightwing..

    This impression will no doubt be enhanced when the tax handout to the wealthy in the reduction of the 50% tax to 45% comes into force. I imagine Labour will not be slow to remind us all of this, contrasting it with the bedroom tax.

  27. @AMBER STAR

    “Indeed; I was alluding to the point that the Government are saying the social housing sector is being brought into line with the private sector when, of course, it isn’t. HB claims in the private sector are not reduced for there being a dining room or study (nor for them being furnished, as you point out) so there is certainly not the equivalence which the Government claim.”

    —————————

    Yep, and hopefully they won’t keep going down this road or they’ll have to increase benefits just so people can afford the charges…

  28. @John Pilgrim

    Thanks

    I agree that the electorate ‘s views are formed over time and that they react to individual policies in the light of these views.

    I also agree that a key part of their experience is in fact shaped by policies on the free movement of labour. capital etc.

    My only query is whether they necessarily interpret these experiences as coming from right wing policies,

    Your evidence for this is a shift left throughout Europe detected by Virgilio. Personally I hope you are right but I suspect that in the UK at least there is an argument to be won and that Labour has still to formulate (or at least publicise) policies that are right from the point of view of social justice and practical from the point of view the ‘global economic and .. labour and demographic movements’ to which you refer.

  29. I miss contributions from Paul Croft, of late, and wonder where he is. Anyone know?

  30. @Billy Bob

    The strategy might work if the leader were genuinely right-wing and of English ancestry.

  31. “As for the Conservatives positioning themselves in the centre, the problem is that was the strategy of Cameron at the last election and it failed to win a majority. Ashcroft has looked at the numbers and doesn’t see the point of investing again in marginal seats – voters there just won’t be buying it again.”

    Well, I agree that Ashcroft know nows from 2010 that ploughing money into marginal seats has little or no effect.

  32. @John Pilgrim

    “Thanks for the clarification – I’ld be happy to hear from either source what you mean by “heuristics”. “Gobbledygook” perhaps? I write as a hardened practitioner.”

    Lol. I’m like you; one of the advantages of being an occasional purveyor of gobbledygook, which indeed I am, is that it does enable you to detect it in others very quickly!

    @Charles

    “I miss contributions from Paul Croft, of late, and wonder where he is. Anyone know?”

    I agree. I miss his quick wit and humour and I hope he intends to return one day.

  33. AS
    Thanks for your contribution and you and your parents have my deepest sympathy.
    Billy Bob
    I would not dare to interpret what AS told us, of course not.. But be aware (if you were not already) that it is quite possible for a dementia sufferer to speak of her parents even if she had never known them and was an orphan, for instance. My mother frequently spoke of her carers as captors (which of course, although benevolent, essentially they were) and her several husbands, even though she and my late father had been a devoted and totally monogamous Darby and Joan. Not really knowing who they are any more, they have no way of relating to the world they find themselves in.

    I am afraid that the sheer fantasy world of dementia is not worthy of anyone trusting anything that the sufferer says. Their vulnerability, as a result, is horrendous to contemplate, unless they are in a secure care home, and the family relieved of the pain and worry.

    I won’t write again AW but thank you for the opportunity to air this. It needs all-party agreement.

  34. @Howard – ” …sheer fantasy world”

    I hope you’ll excuse me for being irreverent for a moment, but we on UKPR should perhaps be thinking about our future care needs.

    A UKPR care home could do with a Thatcher Years Nirvana day-room. The Thatcher Years Hell day-room would, however, need a sturdy partition between Blair Sinner/Saint areas.

  35. @Howard

    “I am afraid that the sheer fantasy world of dementia is not worthy of anyone trusting anything that the sufferer says.”

    True enough, I suspect, when the dementia is severe, However this does not mean that there is not a logic to their confusion. For example, my mother-in-law believed for a long time that she was living over a cake shop in South Molton. Once this was understood an enormous amount that was previously bizarre (e,g. her efforts to pay my wife for bringing in her breakfast) became intelligible. Similarly the emotional content of what they say may be clear even though the practical content is nonsense. And for both these reasons, I think that is often worth taking seriously what is said, even if to believe it would threaten one’s own sanity.

    “Their vulnerability, as a result, is horrendous to contemplate, unless they are in a secure care home, and the family relieved of the pain and worry.”

    Again true enough in my experience. I once had to do with some research which followed up a sample of elderly people who were being looked after by their relatives. The mental health scores of carers whose relatives died or went into some form of care took a sharp turn for the better. By contrast the mental health scores of those who continued to care became worse.

    That said, I feel that the decision to care for an elderly relative in this sort of condition is an immensely personal one and that it has to be an individual choice for which no one is blamed. Those who decide to look after the elderly person at home must be given decent support which fits their particular situation (which in the days when I knew anything about it was sometimes but all too rarely the case).

    This does seem to be something of which politicians are aware for one reason or another. Unfortunately their efforts to help seem to me too often clumsy or even misdirected. And the amount of research money devoted to understanding dementia at any basic level (as opposed to say cancer) is appallingly low.

  36. Martin Williams

    There is no “bedroom tax”.

  37. Heuristics, not to be confused with hermeneutics, is one of those terms which has passed beyond its original, useful meaning into jargon. Originally it meant finding out something for yourself rather than being taught it.
    Eg. (1) You can tell a student there is something called Pi, which can be used to measure [almost] the area of a circle or cylinder. OR (2) You can tell the student that such a constant exists and invite them to discover it for themselves.
    Whenever I encounter a piece of managerial gibberish, which I do approx every 11 minutes, I think of Orwell’s essay, Politics and the English Language, esp. the phrase “[language is not a natural growth] …but a social instrument which we shape for our own purposes.” [Modern linguists would disagree].

  38. The Other Howard

    There is no “bedroom tax

    It’s a lost cause I’m afraid. You’re no more going to get people to call it by its official name (what is it by the way?) than they will refer to the Community Charge Riots.

    Those that live by tabloid values must expect to suffer from them occasionally as well.

  39. Anthony

    It’s probably me being stupid, but the tables for today’s YouGov don’t seem to have appeared on the Archive. I traced them via the news ticker as here:

    http://cdn.yougov.com/cumulus_uploads/document/lmnft0nqbk/YG-Archive-Pol-Sun-results-140313.pdf

    but for some reason nothing dated today has appeared on the Archive page yet.

  40. ROBBIE ALIVE
    “Originally it meant finding out something for yourself rather than being taught it.”

    Heuristic, I always understood, and occasionally had recourse to, to weaken the resolve of those who did not know what it meant, refers to a proposition or hypothesis, or a pilot action, made with a view to finding out the reality (from the Greek). Heuristics. I should think, does risk taking the original far into the realms of gobbledegookism.
    Is it, possibly, related to decoy planning, which I have some claim to having invented, in which, when you do not know the factors likely to come into play in the planning of, say, an agricultural project, you make them up to look like the real facts? These you then display to attract a flurry of corrections from those who know or claim to know the true facts (as in decoy ducks used to attract passing flocks) and which you then collect and pluck to complete the plan, with or without attribution.

  41. “It’s a lost cause I’m afraid. You’re no more going to get people to call it by its official name (what is it by the way?) than they will refer to the Community Charge Riots.”

    ——–

    On top of which, it IS a tax. ..

  42. I must confess, I can’t quite fathom Cameron’s motives for declaring UDI on the implementation of the Leveson proposals and scuppering the cross party talks. Nick Robinson, who knows a thing or two about Cameron’s psyche, thinks it is an attempt, post his PMQs mauling by Miliband, to quickly reassert his authority and reputation for decisiveness. If it is, I’m not sure he’s going to succeed, especially if he’s defeated in the Commons on Monday by a Lib Dem/Labour axis. The organising things in a brewery analogy will get another airing.

    Do you think there might be another method in his madness and he’s calculating that it’s time to please his backbenchers and beat up on Clegg again? The loudest cheers and plaudits he’s received during his three-year Premiership have occurred whenever he has shafted the Lib Dems. Think AV, think EU Referendum and, possibly, think Leveson too. I get the feeling. probably for the first time, that Cameron is feeling vulnerable and starting to hear footsteps behind him. He might well think that the grandstanding on Leveson will renew his true blue Tory credentials within his party. He might also be signalling that he thinks there is political life after the coalition. Maybe he’s testing Clegg’s loyalty ahead of still choppier waters ahead for the coalition.

    Or do we think it’s another piece in the Crosby electoral strategy jigsaw? Get the Press on side, and keep them there, all the way up to May 2015. Cynical, maybe, but if he thinks that a lip-smacking, gung-ho press, gunning for Labour and Miliband, is essential for him to win in 2015, then I guess a few disappointed “luvvy” victims of press intrusion are just necessary collateral.

  43. @ROGER MEXICO
    The Other Howard
    There is no “bedroom tax
    It’s a lost cause I’m afraid. You’re no more going to get people to call it by its official name (what is it by the way?) than they will refer to the Community Charge Riots.
    Those that live by tabloid values must expect to suffer from them occasionally as well.

    Or as I learned by wrote at my catholic school:

    Converte gladium tuum in locum suum: omnes enim, qui acceperint gladium, gladio peribunt.

  44. I suppose we ought to call the “Bedroom Tax” something more neutral….

    How about “An Effective Reduction in Income for Owners of Surpus or Deemed Surplus Rooms where Beds are most often found as Opposed to TV’s, Baths or Sinks”?

    Then again… Perhaps not.

  45. The use of heuristics in the psychology of decision-making refers to resorting to shortcuts and rules of thumb to simplify decisions when matters are complex, or to speed decisions up when time is short and a full exploration would be laborious.

    These can be useful, but can also lead to error and bias. He can correct me if I’m wrong but I had the impression AW was kinda using the term in that way.

    An example of an heuristic might be to follow the herd, or to only listen to people you trust, or only invest in a business in which the owner has also got skin in the game etc.

  46. @That Old Bloke

    > How about “An Effective Reduction in Income for Owners of Surpus or Deemed Surplus Rooms where Beds are most often found as Opposed to TV’s, Baths or Sinks”?

    Unfortunately there a re a few flaws in your name:

    1) They aren’t owners by definition. They are renters.
    2) It only applies to people on low income and receipt of housing benefit.
    3) It’s a lousy acronym: AERIOSDSRWBMOFOTBS
    4) There is no evidence it’s effective.

    I suggest you alter it to:

    “A reduction in income for social renters who have more rooms in their property than decided in a quasi random fashion charge”

    I tried hard to make the acronym A.R.S.E, but it just wouldn’t work…

  47. Because social housing has been paid for direct from the government to the owners of the social housing, those placed into social housing have not had to pay any amount. This changes, and now the government will administrate levies on social housing residents where the government decide they have en excess bedroom.

    The government will take this money, but are under no obligation to pass the money on to the owner of the social housing. There is no link between the actual costs of the extra rooms in terms of rent, and the law simply uses fixed percentages of local rates. In cases where there is a local shortage of housing with the “correct” number of bedrooms (surprisingly common in some areas!), this may even be a charge for occupying housing that actually costs the government less.

    It is therefore a targeted tax on a certain behaviour. And that behaviour is living in social housing with more bedrooms than the government decides. (And let’s note, the decision as to who was allocated to live where, was made by government.)

    Saying it’s not really a tax imposed by the government is the same sort of sloppy argument for saying that the Congestion Charge isn’t really a tax, but an administrative fee.

  48. What about Rental Incentive to Change Housing.

    That would be RICH coming from the Tories.

    Peter.

  49. “I would not dare to interpret what AS told us, of course not.. But be aware (if you were not already) that it is quite possible for a dementia sufferer to speak of her parents even if she had never known them and was an orphan, for instance. My mother frequently spoke of her carers as captors (which of course, although benevolent, essentially they were) and her several husbands, even though she and my late father had been a devoted and totally monogamous Darby and Joan. Not really knowing who they are any more, they have no way of relating to the world they find themselves in.”

    Yes, I can totally relate to all of that. It’s because she sometimes slips into a mode (usually in the evening) where she believes she is a little girl. Then, in her mind, she has to get home to her parents and gets confused and upset.

    “That said, I feel that the decision to care for an elderly relative in this sort of condition is an immensely personal one and that it has to be an individual choice for which no one is blamed.”

    I agree. Most people only want what is best for their parents. We are fortunate in that there are 4 of us to look after her….without all of us, it would be impossible. I am going to try to get a job this year (a bookkeeping business, hopefully) but I am not at all sure how it’s going to work and what we will do. Guess I’ll just have to help out after work and accept that I will have to push the burden more onto my parents.

    Thanks for bringing up the issue and discussing it so openly, Howard. I agree that we desperately need cross-party agreement on the issue.

  50. @Crossbat11

    “…..a lip-smacking, gung-ho press, gunning for Labour and Miliband, is essential for him to win in 2015, then I guess a few disappointed “luvvy” victims of press intrusion are just necessary collateral.”

    Absolutely! And not only the “luvvy” victims, but the Dowlers and McCanns and even Osborne’s granny if it means they can retain a whiff of grapeshot for 2015.
    Nobody should have any illusions that the Conservative party exists primarily to win elections and if successful pay back through fiscal means those who finance it to get there (which is why the LD hand-break these 5 years is so internally damaging for them because they can’t deliver) – everything else good or bad is secondary – indeed very secondary to that primary raison d’etre.

    Since this needs to be applied to the potential impact on VI and this website, an interesting thought occurs to me. Might it be that some of their marginal support amongst the lower to middling aspirers who wait for some fiscally advantage crumbs to fall from their master’s table in the general tax cutting handout of a “real” Conservative government might be currently very disillusioned, and even influenced just a smidgen by “people like them” like the Dowlers and McCanns?

    A tactical balancing exercise by Cameron – I wonder if it is strategically the right call for his party’s electoral prospects in 2015 – for is that not what “ALL” decisions are ultimately based on in our wonderful democracy?

1 2 3 4 6