The post-speech polls

The first poll conducted after Cameron’s Europe speech, YouGov’s on Friday, didn’t appear to show any impact on voting intention. However, this weekend we have a further four polls conducted after the speech (the Opinium one was mostly done prior to the speech). Here they are:

Angus Reid/Sunday Express have the Conservatives on 30% (up three) and Labour on 39% (down three) – the online version of the article doesn’t mention the UKIP or Lib Dem scores. The poll was conducted on Thursday and Friday.

ComRes/IoS/Sunday Mirror has the Conservatives up 5 on 33%, Labour unchanged on 39%, UKIP down 4 points on 10%. As I wrote yesterday, some of this appears to be due to ComRes treating likelihood to vote differently in their December poll, but even with consistent treatment of likelihood to vote the poll would have shown the Conservatives up 4 or 5 points, though it would probably also have shown Labour down slightly.

Survation/Mail on Sunday has the Conservatives on 31%, up two, Labour unchanged on 38% and UKIP down two on 14%.

YouGov in the Sunday Times has topline figures of CON 35%, LAB 41%, LDEM 12%, UKIP 7%. Compared to the average of YouGov’s polls last week that equates to the Conservatives being up by about two, Labour down by about two and UKIP down by about one.

In each individual poll the changes are relatively small, but they are consistent across the pollsters, so we can be fairly confident that the Conservatives have enjoyed a small boost from the referendum promise and the positive publicity around it. UKIP appear to have dropped slightly, but not massively (the biggest drop they had, that in the ComRes poll, was mostly due to methodological variation). The shift is hardly a game changing degree though.

Looking at the other questions, there is some stark variation in how people say they’d vote in an EU referendum. YouGov’s figures are very similar to what they were showing early in the week – in a straight referendum question 37% say they would vote to stay, 39% say they would vote to leave. If David Cameron were to renegotiate and recommend a yes vote then 50% of people say they would vote to stay, compared to 25% who would vote to leave – the contrast is almost entirely down to Conservative voters, who would currently vote to leave, but would vote to stay on renegotiated terms.

Angus Reid asked how people would vote if Cameron did manage to repatriate some powers, 34% said they would vote to stay in, 34% said they would vote to leave.

Survation found 50% saying Britain should leave the EU, 36% that they should stay. If Cameron wins back some powers, 43% of those saying Britain should leave say they would consider voting to stay.


408 Responses to “The post-speech polls”

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  1. Re: Cyber bullying,

    Nobody deserves cyber-bullying, regardless of what they have allegedly or otherwise said. That said, if true, her comments on September 11th were ill-advised and very offensive. But cyber-bullying is never the answer (or justified) against anyone imo.

  2. AMBER

    @”I’m thinking that Helle Thorning-Schmidt’s desired reforms will align more closely with Ed Miliband’s ideas than David Cameron’s. I expect we’ll have to await more details from Mr Hague’s competency committee before we can properly take a view.”

    That would have been my assumption-but she doesn’t sound entirely antagonistic to DC’s ideas either.

    Actually , being a Borgen fan , and -shall we say-an admirer of Birgitte Nyborg, it comes as something of a shock to be told that another woman claims to be Denmark’s Prime Minister. Indeed another woman who is related to Neil Kinnock.

    This cannot be true………can it ?

  3. Red rag,M in M,
    Yes you do have to wonder how secure Cameron is.Firstly the stalking horse
    And then Johnson with his anti hair shirt rhetoric.Sometime Cameron is going
    To say what the details of renegotiation are and then the fur will really start to
    fly.

  4. I don’t consider it bullying to throw insults at someone in retaliation for throwing them at you.

    Mary Beard as well people like David Starkey, Owen Jones and Edwina Currie simply thrive on scandal and causing offence, and they shouldn’t act surprised when that scandal and offence leads to them receiving insults back from those they have offended. To argue that its ok for them to make such offensive statements, but is somehow wrong to throw offensive statements back online is baffling, again I draw the line at threats of violence, those should be reported to the police.

    But for some reason it all depends on your tribe, if your Labour you probably feel that Mary Beard and Owen Jones are perfectly entitled to say what they say but David Starkey and Edwina Currie are out of order, similarly if your a Tory you probably think the reverse.

  5. And in case anybody is wondering how Louise Mensch is doing, there’s some good news about her on ConHome.

    “Former Tory MP Louise Mensch has replaced Toby Young as The Sun on Sunday’s star political columnist.”

    Fortunately for Toby, there was a slot for him at the Telegraph so it’s worked out nicely for all concerned.

  6. So Ms Mensch has her payoff. Didn’t take long.

  7. @ Colin

    This cannot be true………can it ?
    —————
    LOL :-)

    The WestWing had that ‘Borgen’ effect on me at the time!

  8. MitM

    The USA has always been a country of immigration and the percentage of US residents who were foreign-born was actually higher a hundred years ago than now. The only difference is then the majority of incomers were white[1] where now they tend to be Latin American or Asian in origin. Immigration did drop off after the World War II and didn’t really start picking up again till the 70s, but it’s not at unusual (relative) levels. This Wiki article has some interesting tables:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_to_the_United_States

    [1] Though oddly enough they weren’t seen as such at the time. Italians, Jews and even Irish were all at various times as non-whites

  9. “But for some reason it all depends on your tribe, if your Labour you probably feel that Mary Beard and Owen Jones are perfectly entitled to say what they say but David Starkey and Edwina Currie are out of order, similarly if your a Tory you probably think the reverse.”

    I don’t actually really like any of these individuals or their opinions! :P

  10. @ MitM

    I don’t consider it bullying to throw insults at someone in retaliation for throwing them at you.
    —————–
    Mrs Beard didn’t insult anybody whilst appearing on QT; Nor did Anna Soubry, as far as I’m aware. IMO, Don’t insult the person, ‘insult’ the policies, when/if you can’t challenge the facts & need to let off steam.

  11. AMBER

    I never watched that.

    Not too keen on American tv progs-but we have become addicted to the recent output from Denmark & Sweden.

    The Killing / The Bridge/ Borgen-not to mention Wallander.

    Superb.

  12. “I don’t actually really like any of these individuals or their opinions! :P”

    That is, of course, with the usual caveat that I can only go by what they have allegedly said. To be honest, I didn’t know who Mary Beard was until today….but I certainly don’t agree that American deserved to be slaughtered during September the 11th!!! Or that America was/is/will only be getting what it deserves. I also found Starkey terribly grating and offensive during his rants!

  13. @ Colin

    I like all the versions of Wallander; & also the Killing. I am going to get the entire Borgen series when its on DVD or download & watch it as one continuous TV feast when I have time!

  14. “I don’t actually really like any of these individuals or their opinions! :P”

    That’s because Ambi, like me, you are free from viewing everything through red or blue tinted glasses.

    “Mrs Beard didn’t insult anybody whilst appearing on QT; Nor did Anna Soubry,”

    Yes they did, in seperate ways, they both dismissed peoples concerns, their suffering, to be told that the problems in your lives are myths as Mrs Beard put it, or that actually the opposite of what your experiencing is ture as Mrs Soubry put it (provision of public services is apparently increasing) is very insulting and offensive. Mary Beard had her biased report, Anna Soubry didn’t even have that she was just saying the opposite to what everyone else was going through, you talk about cuts and she tells you actually there are no cuts, only spending increases. I was surprised when people then referred to “the coalition”, Anna Soubry didn’t deny such a thing existed.

  15. @ MitM

    Can you really not tell the difference between playing the ball & playing the man? Because, if you are able to tell the difference you are just trolling; & if you can’t, there’s zero point continuing this because I’m not qualified to ‘help’ you.

  16. Amber

    You will enjoy Borgen.

    The PM is a Centrist-but there are some terrific Lefties around-Old Labour types !

  17. “That’s because Ambi, like me, you are free from viewing everything through red or blue tinted glasses.”

    I’m one of those who believes in the right mixture of socialist and capitalist policies; I believe in the right to accumulate wealth (within reason, and only IF you earn it – none of this banker/CEO excessive pay nonsense), but I also believe in a national health service, a welfare state (one that is not excessively bloated but really looks after those who need it i.e. the short-term unemployed/ disabled/elderly etc.). Although my opinion on all the three parties is generally quite negative, I think it’s healthy for all of them to go through regular stages of having or sharing power – that way it negates some of the worse effects of all of them. It’s what I love about the British system – none of the parties are likely to stay in power for too long (i.e. more than 15 years).

  18. @ Colin

    Dennis Skinner has a part! ;-) Now I’m really looking forward to it!

  19. For me, the wealth creators are not CEOs or bankers, but those who contribute their own funds and money, at their own risk, to help grow a company and create jobs (i.e. entrepreneurs). They are the ones who you must encourage and reward IMO.

    I also think it would be incredibly beneficial to those at the bottom of the pay scale, if they had their wages increased. I think Miliband’s suggestion of a working wage is a good one. I would also love to end all this job snobbery that seems so commonplace these days….for me, the unsung heroes are not just entrepreneurs or ‘wealth creators’ or managers but the people cleaning our streets and public toilets for such appalling wages. They should be accorded more respect within our society. Same goes with carers etc.

    I won’t hold my breath though.

  20. @Amber

    Again showing your hypocritical side, it’s so outrageous to make offensive remarks about Mary Beard, but you find it acceptable to make insults about and question my mental health? Nice to see your so predictable with your double standards. No doubt if I made the same remark to you it’d be sexist, or misogynist.

    @Ambi

    “I’m one of those who believes in the right mixture of socialist and capitalist policies; I believe in the right to accumulate wealth (within reason, and only IF you earn it – none of this banker/CEO excessive pay nonsense), but I also believe in a national health service, a welfare state (one that is not excessively bloated but really looks after those who need it i.e. the short-term unemployed/ disabled/elderly etc.).”

    I agree with all of that completely exactly to the dot,

    But for the stuff you wrote about the parties, I can agree that its good that its rare to get them in power for too long (13 years is too long, 18 years (79-97) is even worse.

    But I really do think we need the emergence of some new parties in the UK, I’m not talking about UKIP, I’m talking about new parties that just do what is right and what the public wants, as Ian Hislop said on question time (or maybe Amber thinks he didn’t) politicians should be listening to and bending to public opinion, that’s democracy in action.

    We need to get rid of the party that’s owned by the trade unions, and get rid of the party that’s owned by big business and private school kids. They all put party interest ahead of national interest. It makes finding a party to vote for in 2015 very difficult for me.

  21. @MIM,

    “But I really do think we need the emergence of some new parties in the UK, I’m not talking about UKIP, I’m talking about new parties that just do what is right and what the public wants, as Ian Hislop said on question time (or maybe Amber thinks he didn’t) politicians should be listening to and bending to public opinion, that’s democracy in action.”

    I agree. I have voted for small parties in the past….I have voted for the greens at 2 GEs before now, but when I read through their manifesto before the last GE I found it a bit lacking in substance. Plus, it was a bit too much to the left IMO. So I didn’t vote for them last time round. I would love a small party alternative though.

  22. @ MitM

    What do you want from people here? Permission to cyber-bully? Approval for it? Validation of your approval for it? If so, you’re not getting it from me. So if you want the last word, go ahead & have it because I’ve reached saturation point…

  23. @Colin/Amber

    So who plays the Danish version of Eric Heffer part in this Borgen series then??!!

    @Paul C

    I’ve enjoyed your references to the F.A. Cup this afternoon but as a Villa fan, I couldn’t possibly comment!

    @Ambivalent Suporter/MiM

    I fear that your quest for a political party that meets your every aspiration and ideal will be a fruitless one. They’ve never existed and I doubt that they ever will but parties are an essential part of a functioning representative democracy. I think you parody the origins and qualities of the two main parties, by the way, but where I think I may have some sympathy with you is that we don’t have enough parties in this country. By dint of that, we have ended up with just a few monolithic parties that attempt to be all things to all men and, in so doing, span too wide a breadth of opinion. Accordingly they can be quarrelsome coalitions a lot of the time where the art of low politics becomes an essential modus operandi. Of course, a PR system would go a long way to transforming our current sclerotic party political structure but that’s another argument for another time. I remain a Labour supporter not on an uncritical, my party right or wrong, basis but because they represent my many and varied bundle of beliefs and hopes better than any other. That’s why I’d like them to gain power and win elections. Pretty simple basic stuff really.

  24. One or two have mentioned possible plots against DC. I wrote earlier, before all this irrelevant verbiage about QT, which thankfully, I, like the vast majority, never watch, that I think DC will bask in his few points steal from UKIP, but apparently the ‘b*stards’ are still not satisfied.

    If true, then sleeping with the devil will prove unwise for DC in the longer run.

  25. Amber

    I’m here to discuss issues that arise and their impacts. If you are incapable of the maturity required for such discussion and feel the mere mention of the topic should be censured then I humbly recommend you do indeed excuse yourself from the debate as you’ve stated you would.

    @Ambi

    I voted for the independent in the Kent PCC election, which was refreshing to be able to vote for something other than the current stale parties. I was considering the Greens too actually. On the face of it, they are quite appealing, but as you say when you dig deep down they are a little too far left.

    In 2010 I voted for the Tories because I found Gordon and Labour may have started with good intentions had become a big mess after 13 years. But now I feel the tories have just made things worse, the choice is between the guys who made the mess or the guys who made the mess worse.

    I think we need a new hybrid system, we need the America system of having primaries, but we need to take out the American element of big money donors.

    Why do I ask for primaries because even in the parties which I dislike there are individuals within them who I think are very good, and would make great leaders. Alan Johnson and David Davis spring to mind for me personally as they understand the working class, as they come from it, and wouldn’t be as quick to harm them with their policies, alas the oxbridge elite have a tight grip on power.

  26. @CrossBat1,

    “I fear that your quest for a political party that meets your every aspiration and ideal will be a fruitless one.”

    Of course it will. It will for everyone beyond the real tribalists….though, I expect even they are unhappy at some party political and policy issues. I’ve never sought a perfect party….merely one that better reflects my views. The problem with the three main parties IMO is that they are too driven by self and party-political interest.

    “I remain a Labour supporter not on an uncritical, my party right or wrong, basis but because they represent my many and varied bundle of beliefs and hopes better than any other. That’s why I’d like them to gain power and win elections. Pretty simple basic stuff really.”

    That’s why I have voted for the greens twice….not because I supported everything they stood for, but because they were a ‘better fit’. At the next GE, I will no doubt choose a party that best does the same.

    “By dint of that, we have ended up with just a few monolithic parties that attempt to be all things to all men and, in so doing, span too wide a breadth of opinion.”

    I totally agree with you there. Nothing to add to that.

  27. Colin
    You are tempting me to Borgen, but I watched only a portion of the first episode and gave up (no perseverance stamina) but I too was glued to the ‘tecs’. Of course they involved the political scene too. What I liked was nobody was perfect (a la USA and UK output); all were flawed, even the bereaved of the murdered children. That made it all the more believable we thought. I need to believe when watching or reading fiction.

  28. @MIM

    Have you ever been active in a political party, I wonder?. Labour is NOT “owned by the trade unions”, and the Conservatives are NOT “owned by big business and private school kids”, either constitutionally or in practice. I know that from 40 years experience as an LP member and 35 years experience as a policy civil servant. Neither party would have survived so long as mainstream parties of Government if they were so narrowly based. I’m Labour but some of my best friends are Tories and Libdems and Greens and Plaid : your comments are as insulting and dismissive as Mary Beard was, actually, to anyone who has spent time working (often for nothing) within our political parties. Tolerance please !

  29. Howard,what was that old saying that when you sup with the devil you need a long spoon.Perhaps that could apply to either of the coalition leaders.LOL.

  30. Just a very general point: can I suggest a moratorium on continuing debates with any poster unable to at least TRY to understand a valid counter- argument? Especially when they become consistently offensive and personally rude.

    Re September 11th by the way: I have just read Mary Beard’s article in the London Review of Books and she begins her comments with

    “There is a feeling….. ”

    which undoubtedly there was and still is. Whether she shares it I don’t know but one can’t conclude definitively that she is doing any more than observing and reporting it.

    It seems unlikely in a way as it was a very large number of innocent men and and women who lost their lives and they certainly couldn’t be said “to deserve it”.

    However if we are unable to accept others saying things that we vehemently disagree with then we are on the slippery slope to censorship. I am proud that we live in a country where, as in The Life of Brian, it is considered acceptable to see humour in religion for example, and we at last have a law that says clearly that offending people or being offended oneself is part and parcel of living in a democracy.

    Since “offence” is clearly subjective its about bloody time.

  31. Just a very general point: can I suggest a moratorium on continuing debates with any poster unable to at least TRY to understand a valid counter- argument? Especially when they become consistently offensive and personally rude.

    Re September 11th by the way: I have just read Mary Beard’s article in the London Review of Books and she begins her comments with

    “There is a feeling….. ”

    which undoubtedly there was and still is. Whether she shares it I don’t know but one can’t conclude definitively that she is doing any more than observing and reporting it.

    It seems unlikely in a way as it was a very large number of innocent men and and women who lost their lives and they certainly couldn’t be said “to deserve it”.

    However if we are unable to accept others saying things that we vehemently disagree with then we are on the slippery slope to censorship. I am proud that we live in a country where, as in The Life of Brian, it is considered acceptable to see humour in religion for example, and we at last have a law that says clearly that offending people or being offended oneself is part and parcel of living in a democracy.

    Since “offence” is clearly subjective its about bloody time.

  32. I have recently been tempted by Borgen as well, despite being quite into politics, and watching Question time and this week, I’ve never watched parody shows such as The Thick of it, yes prime minister, or this Borgen, but have recently been tempted by friends to do so.

    But then some of these friends are the same friends who recommended the avengers to me, I’m watching it now, I’m 60 minutes through, another 77 to go and to be honest its not that good at all.

    I understand trying to best find a party that represents your views, but for me, all the parties have big flaws that I couldn’t bring myself to vote for.

    The left wing parties are all ridiculously pro immigration, and the right wing parties all seem a little heartless towards the poor, and then the BNP who I don’t count as left or right, are too hostile to immigrants.

    I agree with the call for PR, but none of these weird methods that have been cooked up like STV or AV+ or the EU one which requires some maths equation to work out who gets how many seats. It’s something like, total votes divided the number of seats you have + 1 and then if your highest you win a seat, but then you have to recalculate to see who gets the next etc etc.

    It should be simply 1% of the vote = 1% of the seats. I know that will let in a few crazies, but that’s preferable to the current system.

    I doubt it will happen in the near future, but with the ever amazing evolution of the internet maybe direct democracy will one day be a reality? And our descendants will laugh at us how undemocratic and primitive we were that we had to pick someone else to represent our views for us.

    Switzerland has a lot of direct democracy and it doesn’t seem to have done them any harm.

  33. I dunno why my posts are now turning up twice but I expect its ‘cos they’re jolly good.

    “If you are incapable of maturity………….”

    Ha! Now that IS a guddun.

  34. PaulCroft,

    Good point. Though, I would say that her comments were at best ill-advised, poorly chosen and likely to cause offence. A bit like Starkey’s. But she certainly didn’t deserve to be cyber-bullied.

    According to wikipedia:-

    “She opined that many people, once “the shock had faded”, thought “the United States had it coming”, and that “[w]orld bullies, even if their heart is in the right place, will in the end pay the price” (the so-called “Roosting Chickens argument”). In a November 2007 interview, she stated that the hostility these comments provoked had still not subsided, although she believed it had become a standard viewpoint that terrorism was associated with American foreign policy.

  35. @Paul Croft,

    “However if we are unable to accept others saying things that we vehemently disagree with then we are on the slippery slope to censorship.”

    I totally agree.

  36. Welsh Borderer

    I agree Labour is trying to move away from the Trade Union grasp, but the fact that their leader owes his position thanks to their votes does in my opinion weaken his position. The members and MP’s wanted DM, both these 2 segments of the electoral college preferred DM to EM, but was overturned by the trade union vote.

    I think the problem is worse for the tories, as they derive so much of their funding from rich businessmen, it’s pretty hard to say no to the guy who writes the cheques. The cash for dinners scandal is an example of this, £250,000 or as its also known 10x the average yearly wage, buys you dinner with Cameron and the chance to influence policy. They may deny it, but it’s unrealistic that the Tories would ever seek to offend their big money backers, as then they would be left with no money to fight the next election on.

    That’s why a cap on individual donations to something like £1,000 per person is needed to stop big money buying parties. Just thank god we’re not like the states where the problem is even more extreme and you are actually expected to have dinners with wealthy donors to try and raise cash.

  37. MIM
    Then do what Farage did and build your own party and stop moaning about it, or become active in an existing party and influence.
    No party can offer everything, I tend to vote blue as I believe more in their general ethos than any other party. My best friend is somewhere to the left of Dennis Skinner. His politics are shaped by his upbringing as are mine. He, father a docker, hired at the dock gates each day, then Fleet St. printworker, me middle class farming. Ironically, he went to grammar school, I did secondary modern. We both respect each others point of view.

    As for Mary Beard, she is only guilty of being condescending, in the manner that acedemics often are. They no nothing of the real world & quite why they make it onto QT always baffles me. Obviously the backlash against her was quite outrageous and more akin to Berlin 1933, than London 2013.

  38. @MitM
    Ed Miliband owes his no more to the Trade Unions and their boisses than David Cameron owes his to the businessmen who wrote letter to the press, expecting their customers to vote en bloc for the Tories.

    Labour leadership elections are based on the prinicple of one person one vote – and the “trade union” section of the ballot was made up of millions of individual ballot papers cast by trade union members. IN fact, the electoral college is most unfair to trade union members, whose votes are worth a fraction of an ordinary party member. Likewise a party members vote is worth a fraction of an MPs.

    It has been said that if David Miliband had managed to gain just one extra MP, he would be leader.

  39. @Welsh Borderer

    Perceptions are in many cases larger than reality. You say
    that the Labour Party is not a party run by the trade unions
    – so who pays for it, why are its MP’s and councillors mostly members of trade unions , why do trade unions leaders say the Labour must follow policy they lay down?
    Similarly why is the Tory Party cabinet full of people that have been to public school? The Tory Party once had an MP , Ray Mawby, who was a member of the AEU but I can’t think of any others.In fact Ray Mawby became famous for being ostracised by many fellow Tory MP’s – by all accounts he was a rather puritan man with a strong West Midlands accent which may explain things.

  40. I would quite like my own party, but I’d only bother if we had PR. Farage has spent 20 years of his life on Ukip and has achieved what? Polling in 4th, no seats in the commons, no control over any local councils, a few MEP’s but so what, 12 out of 700+ and not part of a big group means little influence.

    And actually compared to other startups that’s quite good, the Greens have been going for 33 years and have even less success, ok they finally got 1 MP after 3 decades but that’s about it.

    As for the academics on QT, they exist to cause the scandal we are talking about, even the BBC has viewer targets and need to cause a stir to get people watching. Some historian whether it be Mr Starkey, or Mrs Beard saying something outrageous is exactly what they want. Remember when Mr Griffin appeared? They claimed they had a legal duty to invite him on because of the BNP’s “success” in the Euros, but since they got slated for it, seem to have been relieved of that legal duty, making me doubt there ever was a legal duty and they did in fact just want to cause a few headlines and get people tuning in.

  41. Robert

    Thats odd, I had you down as an orange booker libdem

  42. Mitigation

    Would a sensible judge accept that it is reasonabe to shoot someone if, in answer to:

    “why are you watching that rubbish on tv?” replies

    “there’s nothing better on.” ?????????????

  43. John again with the cherry picking “@MitM
    Ed Miliband owes his no more to the Trade Unions and their boisses than David Cameron owes his to the businessmen who wrote letter to the press, expecting their customers to vote en bloc for the Tories.”

    Did you not see my comments slamming the tories for this? It was in the same post!

    The tories rely on the businessmen cash, and Labour rely on trade union cash, both need to be removed immediately. Organisations should be banned entirely, it should be regular people donating anything up to £1,000 that way no one can have too big a stake in any party.

    The trade union system is slightly less worse than big business I grant you that, but it still needs to be removed in my personal opinion, if the trade union members really are that keen on a party, they can donate the money themselves to the party and cut out the middleman.

  44. Its OK: I’ve assumed they would.

  45. RIN Me an Orange Booker? Why so?

    John Ruddy – 1 man 1 vote – not quite accurate, some individuals get 3 votes don’t they? MP vote, Union vote & then a vote as an individual. I stand corrected if that’s changed.

  46. Rob don’t forget organisations associated with the party also get votes, my friend got 4 votes and he’s not even an MP, because he’s an individual labour member, and a member of the fabian society, and some other think tank based thing and a trade union.

  47. cb11

    villa

    who dey?

  48. Robert

    Im not sure, you must have posted something dangerously liberal at some point

  49. @Wolf

    “In fact Ray Mawby became famous for being ostracised by many fellow Tory MP’s – by all accounts he was a rather puritan man with a strong West Midlands accent which may explain things.”

    During Mawby’s time as a Tory MP and Minister in the 1960s he was also a spy for Czechoslovakia and provided information to communist agents in return for money. He had no ideological axe to grind but used the money to pay off gambling debts.

    @Paul C

    “villa
    who dey?”

    Now, up to now I had you down as a decent bloke but this is quite beyond the pale!

  50. Having now stripped my 1971 Norton down to all it’s component parts which are now neatly spread on the Shed floor, I’ve come across something that at first glance seemed to be part of the engine it is like a long rod but it’s not actually attached to anything and seems pretty pointless. I don’t know what it’s technical name is I want to call it a Clegg anybody got any idea what it is.

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