The Guardian have published their monthly poll from ICM. Topline figures with changes from December’s poll are CON 33%(+1), LAB 38%(-2), LDEM 15(+2), UKIP 6%(-1). None of the changes are outside the normal margin of error, so are nothing to get particularly excited about, although for the record it is ICM’s lowest Labour lead since last August (ICM do, anyway, tend to show some of the lower Labour leads because of their reallocation of don’t knows, which tends to help the Liberal Democrats and hinder Labour).

The other question in the survey is yet another contrasting result on capping the increases in benefits – this time showing only 36% of people thinking that “squeezing benefits” is fair and 58% thinking it is unfair. As we have seen earlier, polling on this policy has produced some sharply contrasting results with no easy explanation for the variations. The suggestion in the Guardian that the contrast is a result of opinions changing after the autumn statement doesn’t hold up as YouGov was showing continuing support for a cap this month. It seems to be one of those issues that really does depend entirely on how it is framed, and with no obviously superior or more neutral wording to go far, I don’t think we can conclude much more than that how the public react to the policy probably will depend on how the political parties manage to frame it in the media.


106 Responses to “ICM/Guardian – CON 33, LAB 38, LD 15, UKIP 6”

1 2 3
  1. @ Colin

    THe USA of course, is our biggest single export destination.
    ————-
    Hence the expected US/EU trade deal being perceived as a ‘game changer’.

  2. Laszlo

    Exports to India :-
    2009 £ 2.9 bn
    2011 5.7bn
    2012 Q1/Q3 pro rated £ 4.7 bn

    Exports to USA:-
    2009 £ 33.9 Bn
    2011 £ 39.9 bn
    2012 Q1/Q3 pro rated £ 41.9 bn

    Exports to Switzerland:-
    2009 £ 4.0 bn
    2011 £ 5.5 bn
    2012 Q1/Q3 prorated £ 6.0 bn

    Exports to China :-

    2009 £ 5.4 bn
    2011 £ 9.3 bn
    2012 Qi/Q3 prorated £ 10.3 bn

    @”I really don’t care if the UK stays in or out in this respect ”

    I do-I hope it stays in -I think it will

    @” I don’t think that the Conservatives can win the next elections,”

    I tend to agree -and that makes me anxious too.

    @” Leaving the EU is purely (and I speak only about the political classes and not you) about disciplining the lower classes…”

    What a strange thing to say.

  3. ICM have released the tables already!

    http://www.icmresearch.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2013/01/2013-jan-guardian-poll.pdf

    Before the DKs were reallocated, the Lab lead was 8.0%

    i.e.
    Lab 40.4%
    Con 32.4%
    LD 12.6%
    UKIP 6.7%

    In the original sample, before reweighting to close to GE shares, the disclosed 2010 votes of those responding was Con 225, Lab 224, LD 122, resulting in heavy downweighting of the Lab and upweighting of the LD shares. All well and good, provided that you can rely on the assumption that false recall of 2010 VI isn’t a major issue.

  4. LASZLO

    @”Leaving the EU is purely (and I speak only about the political classes and not you) about disciplining the lower classes…”

    In 1975 Tony Benn wanted the UK to leave EEC , in order to rescue the lower classes.

    Something has clearly changed in left wing thinking over the last 36 years.

  5. I await the redoubtable Virgilo’s inside track on this, but the FT is reporting an interesting election result in Germany that will no doubt give the centre-left parties, particularly the SPD, a significant boost ahead of the general election in September. The FT report goes as follows: –

    “German voters have dealt a new blow to the ruling centre-right coalition government of Angela Merkel, handing the narrowest of victories to the centre-left opposition in a critical election in the state of Lower Saxony, according to the final forecasts of German television.
    The Social Democratic party and its Green party allies have won a one-seat majority in the state parliament in Hanover, according to predictions from the ARD and ZDF broadcasters, after hours of speculation that the result would be a dead heat or give a single-seat lead for the government.”

    It would appear that the real winners were the Greens, although the SPD candidate for Chancellor to run against Merkel later in the year, Peer Steinbrück, will be greatly relieved to see the centre-right parties being defeated in Lower Saxony. On a personal popularity level, he’s still running way behind Merkel, but equally it seems that Merkel is running way ahead of her own party, the CDU and her badly wounded coalition partners, the FDP.

    The good money, and over to you Virgilio on this, is that a resurgent Green Party might well be the kingmaker in September considering that neither the CDU or SPD is likely to gain a majority on their own and the FDP look like they’re facing a near death experience. Could an SPD/Green alliance be forming the next German Government I wonder and what might that do for the balance of power inside the EU if a Steinbruck/Hollande axis is formed? I’m probably getting ahead of myself here, but if the centre left get elected in Italy in a few weeks time, well, what a different place Europe starts to look from the one of only 12 months or so ago when the Sarkozy/Merkel/ Berlusconi centre right triumvirate ruled the roost and largely dictated the EU response to the recession and eurozone crisis.

    Is the centre of political gravity in continental Europe starting to shift, I wonder?

  6. On the trade with EU vs Rest of the World surely looking at the situation now is the wrong perspective. It is what the situation will be like in 10, 20, 30 years time.That would point towards promoting exports to developing economies – China, India, Brazil etc. The question really is: who would negotiate a better deal with those countries – the EU as a whole or the UK (assuming a no vote in 2014) on its own?

    On the benefit policy issue – does any polling ever get done asking people what they think the policy actually is?

  7. AMBER

    THanks.

    Clearly it would be significant, subject to the details.

    I can’t resist bringing this take on the prospect , to your attention though.

    http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/danielhannan/100199046/eu-usa-hold/

    Like you-I do miss those smileys-and your shades .

  8. Colin – Social Chapter?

  9. @ Phil Haines

    “ICM have released the tables already!
    http://www.icmresearch.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2013/01/2013-jan-guardian-poll.pdf
    Before the DKs were reallocated, the Lab lead was 8.0%
    i.e.
    Lab 40.4%
    Con 32.4%
    LD 12.6%
    UKIP 6.7%
    In the original sample, before reweighting to close to GE shares, the disclosed 2010 votes of those responding was Con 225, Lab 224, LD 122, resulting in heavy downweighting of the Lab and upweighting of the LD shares. All well and good, provided that you can rely on the assumption that false recall of 2010 VI isn’t a major issue.”

    I know the way ICM redistributes its Dont Knows is controversial but it may well be their way proves to be a better way of predicting seat totals by happy (or deliberate) accident.

    My take is that the LDs will outperform their UNS seat total as per their average VI. This is because in seats where it matters to vote LD to stop a Con or Lab candidate taking that seat the natural enemies of Con and Lab will vote accordingly.

    However the relevant voters in these seats will probably tell pollsters they are not voting LD right up until they are walking into 2015 GE ballot booths.

    I definitely think that, whatever the methodological differences and irrespective of whether the final % predicted by ICM for the LDs is accurate or not, putting the ICM figure into any UNS seat calculator will give a more accurate figure.

  10. Trade with the EU will happen whether we are members or not.

    However inward investment from non-EU countries would be badly affected as would the status of the City of London. Much EU finance is conducted there but if we leave the EU I would expect there would be significant barriers to conducting any EU business outside the EU. EU regulations would be re-written to exclude London.

  11. No discussion of this important by-election in Westminster?

    http://www.parliament.uk/documents/lords-information-office/2012/candidates-list-e-ferrers.pdf.pdf

    SoCalLiberal will love this evidence that pre 1832 electoral practices are alive and well in the UK Parliament. :-)

  12. Crossbat, not only that but McAllister was being talked of as a future Kanzler, so this could mark the end of one of the CDU’s rising stars, which is yet more good news for the SPD & Greens.

    In other news, leading article in the G-spot says ‘2013 could be a year of great turmoil that sees the debate about welfare move away from slogans about skivers and towards questions of ministerial competence – and the conventional Westminster wisdom that says the Tories can only win on welfare would then come entirely unstuck.’

    To anyone who’s been paying close attention, that myth has already come unstuck. Just look at the YouGov poll the other week showing Labour 8 up on dealing with benefits reform, and all the polls showing Labour ahead on dealing with unemployment. This is because the perceived intentions of a party matter greatly, and many people simply don’t see the Tories as well-intention, no matter how much superficial appeal some of their attack lines may have.

    It’s also why they can talk about immigration all they like, but never mind not helping them, it may actually be hurting them because many people think it’s all hollow talk and it also reminds people of how powerless they are to get net migration down.

  13. If “omnishambles” was the word of 2012, wonder what we’ll get in 2013?

  14. @crossbat11

    A Stern-RTL poll out last week put Angela Merkel’s CDU on 43% and the SPD on 23%.
    Peer Steinbrück gets absolutely thrashed in head to head polling with Merkel, only winning 18% to her 58%.

    I don’t know, was a kind there a kind of Oldham East & Saddleworth effect? Gary Gibbon reports:

    “In Lower Saxony, swathes of CDU supporters lent the troubled FDP their votes to stop the coalition partner becoming extinct. But the CDU supporters collectively miscalculated, as is easy to do, and ended up lending them more than the CDU could spare. The SPD/Green victory couldn’t have been narrower making the miscalculation particularly excruciating.”

    He goes on to speculate about that the SPD may move closer to CDU on EU policy as the election approaches.

    Fwiw view from the US (some commentators anyway) seems to be that nothing happens in Europe without Merkel’s approval… from an article titled Cameron Leading Britain Into Minefield on EU:

    “Britain’s 26 partners would have to be confident in the prime minister’s ability to win a national vote and make an agreement stick over the long term to justify significant concessions. But many EU officials are not convinced Cameron’s Conservatives will win a 2015 general election. There is no incentive to give him more than polite sympathy until then.”

    h
    ttp://www.cnbc.com/id/100394107

  15. @CROSSBAT11
    Indeed a thrilling electoral night yesterday in Germany, with victory changing hands from one minute to the other!!! Finally the Red-Green alliance carried the State of Lower Saxony by a margin of just 0.35% (12,409 votes)!. Detailed results are as follows:
    SPD 32.6 (+2.3 compared to 2008)
    Greens13.7 (+5.7)
    TOTAL RED-GREEN: 46.3 (+8.0)
    CDU 36.0 (-6.5)
    FDP 9.9 (+1.7)
    TOTAL OUTGOING CENTER-RIGHT: 45.9 (-4.8)
    The Left 3.1 (-4.0)
    Pirates 2.1 (+2.1)
    Others 2.6 (-1.3)
    Thus SPD Stephan Weil will replace David McAllister, the CDU German-Scottish Minister-President of Lower Saxony. What is more important is that now the center-left opposition governs 8 out of 16 States, the center-right just 3 and the remaining 5 have grand coalition governments. This means that, out of 69 seats in the Bundesrat (or Federal Council, where German States are represented), the federal opposition now has 36, the gvt. 15 and 18 are “neutral” (grand coalitions), i..e OM for Red-Green. The major surprise came from the score of the Liberals, who on a federal level struggle, according to all VI polls, to cross the threshold of 5%. What really happened is that a number of CDU voters voted “tactically” for the FDP (pre-electoral polls had them between 4 and 5%) so that the center-right have full representation. Many CDU leading figures indirectly encouraged this behavior, and were criticized for this by McAllister himself. And indeed it could have worked, given the very narrow margin of Red-Green victory. On the other hand, these “suggestion” have perhaps urged some potential Left of Pirate votes to vote “useful”, i.e. Red-Green (especially the Greens are at all-time high, which might be due partly to this trend). Of course this result does not prefigure the September GE outcome, but it is a clear sign of center-left turn. What complicates things on the GE level is that The Left will be very probably represented (the get 6-9 in VI polls) mainly due to its strong showing in former East Germany, and thus no clear majority will be possible, so either there will be a Red-Green minority gvt supported in Parliament by the Left, or a grand coalition – it is, at any rate, certain that there cannot be a center-right gvt again, not with these numbers, because 46% in Lower Saxony means 43-44 in the whole of Germany, so even if FPD finally makes it to the Parliament (e.g. 39+5, or 38+6), it is still insufficient. Wait and see, certainly a very interesting electoral year!!!

  16. Hal

    “However inward investment from non-EU countries would be badly affected as would the status of the City of London. Much EU finance is conducted there but if we leave the EU I would expect there would be significant barriers to conducting any EU business outside the EU. EU regulations would be re-written to exclude London”

    I would think that the euro countries will be very keen to get euro based trading under their own control with their own regulations. It’s a bit odd for London to be the financial center of Europe when it doesn’t use the regions main currency, even odder is that the euro countries allow it

  17. @ Colin

    I used the EU :-) trading statistics 2009-2011. Will check it again once I can be at my computer.

  18. Laszlo

    My numbers were from

    ONS.
    Monthly Review of External Trade Statistics.
    November 2012 Edition

  19. Sun/YouGov poll tonight: Labour lead down to single figures – CON 33%, LAB 42%, LD 10%, UKIP 10%. Cameron is closing the gap a bit.

    The Sun tweeting tonight’s poll. Have the polls been released tonight because they are excited about the 1% change or are we going back to polls being released in the evenings rather than the following morning?

  20. Liz H – They do that every time they think it is a good poll for the Tories. It shows how far Cameron has fallen if the sun think being 9% behind is a good poll.

    If it goes back to double figures in the next one the tumbleweed will roll across the sun twitter feed :-)

  21. Speaking of the Sun, has anyone else seen the poll on YouGov’s site where people are asked if they knew what ‘statutory’ means?

    The result were broken down by newspaper and I think Guardian readers came out best with 93%. The rest of the papers generally scored in the 80s, leaving the Sun/Star with 48% not knowing what statutory means.

    Says it all about what tacky, trashy bog roll it is.

  22. The US is our single largest export market…. but only if you count the EU as 26 separate destinations.

    Like it or not the EU is the worlds largest economy and trading zone and we sell almost as much there as in the rest of the world.

    It is a bit disingenuous in a debate about the relative merits EU not to view in as a single entity.

    Peter.

  23. Re the EU being in or out will be an irrelevance in a few years time, Europe is on a downward spiral economically with far to many lame duck countries within the EU for it to ever to be a true economic success.
    British business has begun the slow process of looking outside Europe for new markets this will gain momentum in the next few years and trade with the EU will decline
    One of the problems with being in the EU was that business and politicians came to believe that it was only trade with the EU that mattered and because of that successive governments have been prepared to give more and more powers to Brussels almost to the point that nearly all new laws affecting this country come from Brussels.
    Originally the Common Market was a good idea but because the EU is run by a vast unaccountable bunch of bureaucrats with Leaders who have lost powers in there own countries to act independently, it’s gradually becoming a rather dull witted fellow.
    Britain being in or out of the EU is not so much about trade but more to do with confidence of this country to succeed on it’s own.

  24. Richard,

    Yes, the Eurozone countries would love to move all Euro business from London into the Eurozone. But they can’t do that while we are a member of the EU because it is against current EU trading rules and we can veto any changes.

    My point is that all that changes if we leave the EU.

  25. @LizH

    “Cameron is closing the gap a bit.”

    Judging from the 5 poll averages, Con have picked up ~1% from UKIP since Xmas, presumably a consequence of the non-speech. Lab and LD have been rock steady.

    It remains to be seen whether Con will hold onto that shift in VI once Cameron actually gives his speech.

  26. @Turk: “Europe is on a downward spiral economically with far to many lame duck countries within the EU for it to ever to be a true economic success.”

    I suspect there is a hint of wishful thinking in this statement.

    The US is also a collection of disparate economies with a spread very similar to the EU’s.

    The poorest US state has a GDP per capita roughly half that of the richest, as does the poorest EU member when compared to the richest*.

    *Although, I concede that we have to exclude Luxembourg and Romania/Bulgaria. However, I hardly think these three outliers are sufficient evidence for such doom-saying.

  27. @Red Rag
    “They do that every time they think it is a good poll for the Tories.”

    I agree. I wish Anthony would bring the evening polls back. It is never the same seeing them in the morning buried among several comments. Maybe that is deliberate as long as Labour is doing well in the polls.

    @Robin

    “Cameron is closing the gap a bit” – I should have made it clear that those were the Sun’s words rather than mine by putting them within inverted commas. I agree that Labour has been rock steady, not sure about LDs.

  28. Not sure Tony Benn is a fan of the EU even now.

  29. Turk,

    It’s one thing to not like the EU or even to think we would be better off out of it, but claiming that the largest fee trade bloc in the world with a combined GDP of over $17.5 trillion will be ” an irrelevance in a few years time” is just nonsense.

    Please let the rest of us know just where exactly is 22% of the worlds $80 trillion GDP going to disappear to.

    Peter.

  30. @OldNat

    Thanks for the delightful link. I feel a medley of top tunes from “Iolanthe” coming on.

    As you know, this particular electoral process is nowhere near as old as 1832, but haven’t we disguised it beautifully so that it matches the Gothic interior of our constitution!

    PS. Why not start a new tradition on UKPR by providing a topical quote from your illustrious countryman on the 25th? Or is he to be thrown out of the new modern easy-clean Scotland too.

  31. POSTAGEINCLUDED

    I’m sure that your post originated in a thought process within your head.

  32. Old Nat

    It’s rather disappointing that the Returning Officer isn’t the Garter King of Arms and the ballot papers of the finest vellum, hand-illuminated.

    Still after all this rigmarole, the successful candidate will still have marginally more democratic legitimacy than most of his fellow Peers, chosen by a single Party leader.

  33. ROGER MEXICO

    Interesting point!

    If the democratically elected Tory peer has armorial bearings registered in Scotland, then the Lord Lyon’s court would have precedence over the Garter King of Arms. :-)

    Would they have to contest at the lists to determine precedence? We should be told these essential details!

  34. NICKP
    If “omnishambles” was the word of 2012, wonder what we’ll get in 2013?

    —————–
    Let’s hope it isn’t “omnidip”…

  35. POSTAGEINCLUDED

    Alas, i noted only your “PS”.

    Can we combine our voices in a G&S song?

    How about “Spurn Not the Nobly Born”? – as long as those unnobly born such as Lords Forsyth Foulkes et al are recognised as being beyond the pale.

  36. Odd comment on BBC News that Head Teachers might be closing schools because keeping them open with few pupils able to attend would affect their attendance records.

    Do Ofsted standards in England not allow contingencies for such situations?

  37. @OldNat
    Glad you got back to me on that, I’ve been trying to find “your post originated in a thought process within your head” in my Burns Complete Works for the last 2 hours. Never mind. I found this instead to confound the philistines:

    “Your friendship, Sir, I winna quat it,
    An’ if ye mak’ objections at it,
    Then hand in neive some day we’ll knot it,
    An’ witness take,
    An’ when wi’ usquabae we’ve wat it
    It winna break.”

    I’ll not sing with you, however, as to do so would violate many byelaws and a high court injunction.

  38. POSTAGEINCLUDED

    :-)

    Burns’ thoughts frequently originated in a different part of his anatomy from his head!

    an injunction has no relevance in Scotland, where you would need an interdict to achieve the same result.

    I could stand in England/Scotland, and you in Scotland/England across the border, and sing a duet free from legal interference!

    “A plague o’ both your houses” might be appropriate – though which of which of us was Capulet or Montagu or didn’t give a damn for either would need to be resolved.

  39. @OldNat
    If a suitably remote and beautiful spot on the Tweed can be found (not too hard a problem) then it’s a deal. Bring your own earplugs.

  40. Turk

    Very drolll.

  41. GRHINPORTS
    Mike Smithson linked to this paper about incumbancy bonus –
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261379412001485
    I can’t access it (restricted journal access is a real barrier to self-education), but it argues that Labour MPs had a 2% incumbency bonus, Conservatives had a 1% incumbency bonus and LibDems had a 6.8% incumbency bonus.
    Labour candidates standing against LibDem incumbents had a 1% ‘penalty’ and Conservatives against LibDems a 5.1% penalty.

  42. Peter Cairns

    @”but only if you count the EU as 26 separate destinations.”

    An interesting remark.

    ermm….that’s what they are.

    The decline in exports to EU countries has not been of the same magnitude for each country. Italy , & France have seen much larger declines than Germany for example.

    EXporting is not just a matter of regulation. It requires the exporter to respond to & exploit cultural, social , and other drivers of demand. These differ. As you will know, the EU economies did not “converge” according to the grand plan. So there are different economic factors dictating price barriers for exporters.

    Of course these countries are different destinations.

    They are different markets.

  43. The difference in YG and ICM is just down to method so no change there.

    DS
    ‘Speaking of the Sun, has anyone else seen the poll on YouGov’s site where people are asked if they knew what ‘statutory’ means?
    The result were broken down by newspaper and I think Guardian readers came out best with 93%. The rest of the papers generally scored in the 80s, leaving the Sun/Star with 48% not knowing what statutory means.
    Says it all about what tacky, trashy bog roll it is.’

    Surely it ‘says it all’ about the readership?

  44. @Billy Bob

    You’re right that some miscalculated tactical voting by CDU supporters may have let the SDP and Greens sneak in in Lower Saxony and that Merkel’s personal popularity is boosting the CDU in the current polls vis-a-vis the SPD, but this isn’t translating into actual votes when they’re cast in real elections. Lower Saxony is the latest example of this, but only 8 months ago in North Rhine Westphalia, the SPD gave the CDU a drubbing in a regional election that accounts for about a quarter of the German electorate. As Virgilio points out, the centre left in Germany is now in control of half of the regional assemblies and this gives them a strong base in the forthcoming national election.

    That said, maybe Merkel’s personal standing may swing it for the CDU in September, but she and her party have never won outright and have had to form a coalition with firstly the SPD and then the FDP in order to form a government. It’s difficult to see that changing and it’s quite feasible that the Bundestag arithmetic may give rise to a centre-left coalition in September, especially if the Greens continue on their upward curve.

    Of course, another CDU/SPD coalition can’t be ruled out either and that’s always an intriguing proposition. Anybody think we’ll see an equivalent Labour/Tory coalition after the May 2015 election – all in the national interest, of course! lol

    @Liz H

    The latest YouGov poll showing a Labour lead of 9% and a L 42 C 33 LD 10 UKIP 10 configuration is indeed earth shattering news and well worthy of what is always the harbinger of apocalyptic events; a Sun tweet!! Why, we haven’t had a poll like this for, er, wait for it…………………4 whole days!

    And we also had one on December 20th…and January 7th…..and January 16th………………………..zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

  45. On the trade with EU vs Rest of the World surely looking at the situation now is the wrong perspective. It is what the situation will be like in 10, 20, 30 years time.That would point towards promoting exports to developing economies – China, India, Brazil etc. The question really is: who would negotiate a better deal with those countries – the EU as a whole or the UK (assuming a no vote in 2014) on its own?

    -Well trade with the rest of the World will probably rise.

    However, the demographics in China and population pressures in India make this not at all certain in the medium to long term.

    Membership of the EU hasn’t prevented Germany’s exports to the rest of the World being 300% the UK’s.

    Currently UK exports to the little economy of the Republic of Ireland exceed that to China,India and Brazil combined.

  46. Virgilio, BB and CB11,

    The ‘victory’ in Lower Saxony is only down to the fact that the voters have two votes, so CDU supporters could give second preference to FDP. The overall percentage made CDU the largest proportional vote (ok, 6.5 down) and I don’t think SPD has any confidence that its leader can swing it in September, not according to my reading of German press, anyway.

    I’ve got ‘Göttingen’ by Barbara running around my brain this morning. It’s all to do with the continuing EU speech nonsense (deary deary me).

    I think, as a West Country man, I prefer her German version (we Saxons, eh) , but both are beautiful (sigh)..

  47. @ Tinged Fringe

    Thanks for such an informative link! It confirms something I have always felt that whilst its very difficult for the LDs to get an MP elected in the first place, once they do these MPs are incredibly “sticky”

    It also confirms the point about the LDs benefiting from tactical voting, particularly, but not exclusively (witness Simon Hughes in Bermondsey & Southwark and Sarah Teather in Brent Central) when this has been driven by an anti-Tory coalition of voters.

  48. Of course there are many who believe anti-Con tactical voters will desert the LDs at the 2015 GE because of the LD involvement with the coalition.

    At times the anger felt by this type of voter has been palpably expressed in the public domain and in VI.

    The open question remains though (and I believe at this stage in the absence of much serious polling on it one can only theorise) is whether this anger will directly transfer to the ballot box in constituencies where when expressed it can only really result in an extra Con MP being elected.

    Clearly in his recent open letter about Cameron winning in 2015 Peter Kelner believes this anger will be demonstrated. Personally I am not convinced.

  49. Times reports Hessletine & the pro-Eu Con MPs are considering supporting DC’s call for a referendum.

    Said to follow concerns that the message from Hezza that a referendum is too risky, is not voter friendly.

    That will leave EM as last man standing on the “can’t trust them to say “In”” platform.

    ………apart from Clegg I suppose.

  50. @Colin

    “That will leave EM as last man standing on the “can’t trust them to say “In”” platform.”

    Taking an isolated position, as long as its principled, isn’t always a bad place to be politically. I thought Martin Kettle was interesting on this recently and his article is well worth a read, especially considering that he’s a political commentator who’s been very supportive of the Coalition in the past and highly critical of Labour: –

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jan/17/labour-must-leave-eu-schisms-to-tories

1 2 3