Tonight’s polls

I am out tonight, so won’t be around to comment on any polls that appear until either late or, more likely, Sunday morning. Tomorrow’s papers are, however, our first real chance to see some polling on the Leveson report. We can expect to see the usual Opinium poll in the Observer and YouGov’s weekly poll in the Sunday Times – I don’t know of anything else yet, but obviously it is possible.


125 Responses to “Tonight’s polls”

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  1. AW

    While you are away we will just talk cr*p as usual

  2. @PAULCROFT

    When a judge is ruling on things,would you not consider it is better to be in his good books!

  3. smukesh:

    I have nothing to worry about: my moral compass is set to …… I dunno,,,, something moral anyway.

    Second BBC news headline was JK Rowling on Cameron. Very negative and combined with all the others I just don’t see this going well for him.

  4. Anthony:

    I am surprised that you get to “go out” – especially on a Saturday night – but, if you must then I hope you have a nice time.

    Paul

  5. Expect to see some of the most extreme leading questions and skewed reporting for a long time.

    Q: Do you agree that Government’s should not be allowed to censor the work of brave journalists (such as the MP’s expenses scandal) ?

    Q: Do you think the Government and MPs can be trusted to decide whether newspapers can publish stories about Politician’s behaviour?

    Q: So you agree that Cameron is a bold defender of free speech and that Miliband is a Stalinist Brownite control freak who wants to stop innocent Page 3 fun?

  6. rogue apostrophe alert

  7. NickP

    As your self-appointed monitor may I point out that, in the context used, “governments” is – wot we experts call – a “plural”.

    Glad to help………………

  8. got there before you

    (don’t know who put that apostrophe in…I suspect Government interference)

  9. NP:

    As you spotted it yourself detention will be halved.

  10. Can’t do detention, Sir, Mum’s ill with the plague.

  11. @ Paul Croft

    Your not helping with the flow of the thread with you’re tendancy to pick up on grammatical errors all the time!

  12. The problem with regulation of print media, is that in 10 years time, they may all be online and not sell many in paper format. The only ones in paper format will be the free papers like the Metro, given out to commuters.

    What will the government do about regulating mobile/internet media ? If I set up a small online publication that contained a small amount of local news, would I need to sign up to any new regulator ?

    I think Levesons proposals need careful consideration and there should be no rush to legislate simply to deal with the recent media scandal. Any new regulator backed up by statute needs to be fit for the next 20 years.

  13. PAUL CROFT

    @”Second BBC news headline was JK Rowling on Cameron. Very negative ”

    Well fancy that!

    Who would have thought ?

  14. R Huckle
    I think the problem with online publication, and why Leveson left it alone, is that it’s virtually impossible to regulate.
    If the government regulated websites over here, they’d just move abroad.

    BUT! And it’s a bit but..

    The internet operates differently from print media because the internet allows, almost, for unlimited competion due to the low cost of production and distribution.
    The print media requires large upfront and running costs, especially on a national level, so competition in print media is inherently restricted by economics.
    So there area fundamental differences between the two.

    So you’re comparing apples and pears and then saying the government shouldn’t regulate the apple market because the trend for the future is the consumption of pears.
    It’s a false dichotomy of ‘we must regulate both’ or ‘we must regulate neither’, and I suspect that you know it’s a false argument.

  15. Second BBC news headline was JK Rowling on Cameron. Very negative and combined with all the others I just don’t see this going well for him.

    Expeliecameronus!

  16. R HUCKLE

    Gosh-wish I’d said that.

    What a sensible post.

    Actually I think the revelations & self examination of the last year or so could result in a cleaned up Police Force, and a less gungho Press .

    …but a few stiff jail sentences involving policemen , newspaper staff & the odd public “servant” will help enormously.

  17. R HUCKLE,

    Absolutely, it’s just like international war crimes legislation, troops everywhere being forced to live within a legal framework with sanctions, just because of the Nazi’s…….

    Peter.

  18. PETER CAIRNS

    Bit of a mixed metaphor there I feel-plus the tell-tale Godwin.

    If you had said :-

    ” It’s just like the bereaved parents of road accident victims being able to demand hanging for all hit & run drivers-or someone who has just been burgled invoking public flogging for all burglars.”

    -it might have been a more accurate portrayal.

    The question is -should the victims of any crime be entitled to prescribe punishment for criminals?

    …or is due process & the absence of emotion, a better way to decide?

  19. COLIN………Attention seeking billionaire story teller criticizes Govt., where? In the papers! They can be useful, when they’re not tapping your phone, I do feel so sorry for her, it must be tough to be so vulnerable. :-)

  20. COLIN………Attention seeking billionaire story teller criticizes Govt., where? In the papers! They can be useful, when they’re not tapping your phone, I do feel so sorry for her, it must be tough to be so vulnerable.


    I think it was Her 5 Year Old daughter that was the victim of press intrusion and as J K Rowling is One of an exceptionally short list of the UK Uber Rich who pay their full whack of taxes the rest strikes me as sour grapes.

  21. STEVE…We have a, ‘ celebrity ‘ culture, she knows that, and yet she stokes the fire………..I don’t condone the behaviour of the gutter press, but it rather strikes me that she could be a little less strident and high profile, is this public statement going to help her daughter, or draw attention to her ? I would have thought that, for her daughter’s sake, she would withdraw from the spotlight and concentrate on counting her blessings. Sour grapes…could be I suppose. :-)

  22. Colin:

    Steve says it well enough re JK Rowlings’ daughter – still, probably matters little to you with her being a Labour supporter.

    Re: “Sensible post – wish I’d said that”

    No chance.

    Shev:

    “you’re tendancy”

    mostly I let sleeping thingies lie……………….

  23. @ Ken

    Attention seeking billionaire story teller criticizes Govt., where?
    ———————-
    That’s total tosh. JK rarely sought media attention & went to huge lengths to keep her children’s privacy intact. All she did was write a book, hoping it would make just enough money for to support her family until she wrote another.

    How many authors are the subject of media attention? Not very many! I can assure you, she regards herself as a writer & never wanted to be a celebrity.
    ———————
    where? In the papers!
    ———————
    In the Guardian, the paper which broke the hacking story & the TV media picked it up.
    ——————–
    I do feel so sorry for her, it must be tough to be so vulnerable.
    ——————–
    Read her article or continue to post ignorant guff? Which should you do? I know, I’ll save you the trouble: JK deals with exactly the point you are making: If somebody with her almost unlimited resources is vulnerable & cannot protect the lawful right to privacy of her children, who can?

    JK is writing on behalf of ordinary people, thrust into the limelight by events which are, for them, catastrophic; preyed on by the press when they are least able to cope with it. They do not have the resources to even attempt to protect themselves; nor to get redress when lies have been pubished!
    8-)

  24. I think Colin&Ken are upset that people listen JK Rowling who writes fairy tales, but not Cameron. who tells fairy tales.

  25. Re “attention seeking” JKR, as far as I’m aware she is a very private person. Of course the fact she is also rich and successful makes her fair game in the eyes of the jaundiced and cynical.

    However, my post was meant to very simply point out the political repercussions that may follow from “attention seeking” people who have had their child stolen and then been accused of murder [by our fair and free press] and other, similarly or differently affected individuals and families, criticising Cameron.

    That people then choose to be spiteful rather than engage in that point is, to be frank, rather sick. But the desire, amongst far too many people, to see wrong where none exists does make one realise why the gutter press have sucha a large readership.

  26. Colin,

    Not really a metaphor, I could have used hand guns and Thomas Hamilton.
    Should we curtail a previously lawful activity in the future because of the unwarranted activities of a minority in the past.

    The answer tends to be it depends on how terrible you view the acts that were perpetrated. If it is “never Again” then you will justify the restrictions. If you don’t think it was that bad then you won’t.

    Interestingly I think those who are against strict control might be, and I stress might, the same ones who thought the hand gun ban too strict, or don’t like the idea of people calling for British troops to face trial for war crimes.

    I am never quite sure if on issues like this people split on Libertarian or ideological lines in that you can be left of centre and oppose press regulation and right of centre and support it.

    To an extent what worries me is when it becomes about Us vThem rather than the issue itself. I’d like to see this rise above party trench warfare but somehow I don’t think it will.

    I personally see no reason that the media can’t be fitted into the same kind of framework as Lawyers or Doctors. I think there is a difference between Freedom and Licence and that the press have forgotten that and what is more can’t really be trusted not to abuse their position.

    As to using the “Nazi’s” as an example I’ve never bought the line that it shows a weak argument as such, although it can often be over used, particularly by people comparing minor government officials to the Gestapo.

    I could have used Stalin or Mao, as examples of people who’s terrible actions lead to a realisation that we need a system that means those who abuse power and do terrible things can be held to account, or that even better one that stops it happening again.

    But then as I said in the last thread I don’t se anything unique or special about the press.

    Peter.

  27. @ Ken

    I would have thought that, for her daughter’s sake, she would withdraw from the spotlight and concentrate on counting her blessings.
    ————————
    When you are in a hole, stop digging!

    JK was persuaded to testify at Leveson by David Cameron promising the victims that if they were willing to take the stand & tell their stories, he’d implement Leveson’s proposals provided they were not ‘completely bonkers’.

    JK wanted to keep a low profile but felt it was her duty to make a stand about this issue for the public good, knowing that it would harm her personally & result in anything she writes being routinely slagged by the media for the rest of her career.

    And does JK’s ‘public good’ statement align with what we know of her? Yes, it does actually. She pays full UK taxes on all her UK earnings; has a well run charitable foundation which does very good things & she, herself, lives very quietly here; Edinburgh being a city where even the most famous are ignored when they are shopping in waitrose or drinking in their local bar.
    8-)

  28. Ambereeeeeeee

    For some, when you are in a hole keep digging and then jump in is better advice.

  29. It is sad to see that with the deflation of almost everything that the coalition promised or rather undertook, Colin’s posts have become more and mor ad hominem, strawman-shaking and arbitrary choice of references to reporting anything that contrary to all evidence may suggest that everything is ok (and Palmerston is still PM).

    I really hope that this is the reason and something else for this

  30. @ Old Nat (from the previous thread)

    “I can’t believe that it’s 57 years ago today that Rosa Parks sat down in that Alabama bus!

    Is the anniversary celebrated at all?”

    No, not really I’m afraid. It does get marked occassionally by civil rights orgs. I almost can’t believe it’s been 57 years either. The progress is incredible yet sometimes, attitudes from 57 years ago still seem to persist.

    Btw, you as a former school headmaster are the perfect person to ask. Did you ever have elected student councils or student body presidents in your school?

  31. @ Croftee

    For some, when you are in a hole keep digging and then jump in is better advice.
    ———————-
    LOL… all the way to Australia :-)

  32. It is sad to see that with the deflation of almost everything that the coalition promised or rather undertook, Colin’s posts have become more and mor ad hominem, strawman-shaking and arbitrary choice of references to reporting anything that contrary to all evidence may suggest that everything is ok (and Palmerston is still PM).

    I really hope that this is the reason and something else for this somewhat gradual, yet radical change.

  33. AMBER STAR and fellow JKR fan-club members, I admire your loyalty………… :-)

  34. So celebrities were ‘asking for it’ because of the way they was ‘advertising themselves’?

    I spy with my little eye, a familar victim blaming meme that I’ve seen used in defence of other immoral behaviour.
    Funny how that one comes up when defending the powerful against their victims.

  35. LASZLO

    @”t is sad to see that with the deflation of almost everything that the coalition promised or rather undertook, Colin’s posts have become more and mor ad hominem,”

    Eh?

    I think your confusing me with Paul Croft mate .

  36. Ken:

    Do grow up. Personally I’ve never seen the films or bought into the “children’s books for adults” stuff.

    What on earth has this to do with our evil, prurient, nasty press one way ot the other though? I do wish people like you could be subject to press harassment and lies just to see if your attitude remains the same.

  37. SoCalLiberal

    Most Scottish schools have “Pupil Councils” – the exceptions are mainly our very small rural schools with only 1 or 2 teachers, where formal structures are less appropriate.

    Here’s an outline of what they do

    http://www.youngscot.org/info/149-pupil-councils

  38. They *were*.

    I began with a specific individual but the victim blaming meme applies across the board.

  39. PETER

    THanks.

    As already stated, I don’t buy the analogy with Lawyers or Doctors., but there seems little point in going through it all again after the previous thread.

  40. I advocate an independent self-regulator for critics of JKR…..the propensity of the Left to put their heroes on pedestals always intrigues me, Tony Blair, Gordon, and now the almost Saintly JKR. It must be so satisfying to have such faith. :-)

  41. @SoCaL

    Did you ever have elected student councils or student body presidents in your school?
    ———————
    They did have them at my High School. But the students were chosen, not elected. There was a protest about this when I was in 4th year (nothing to do with me); the purpose was to have a genuine representative of the students on the board of prefects (they were nominating me & I didn’t know anything about it! Being kids, they didn’t know that you are supposed to ask a person before you nominate them).

    The reason being, I met all the academic & sporting criteria but I was passed over for being a punk who wouldn’t wear the uniform & for being against corporal punishment. I thought it was wrong altogether; & that it was unfairly implemented: Boys were strapped for things which girls ‘got away with’. And when girls did get the strap, it was a ‘tickle’ compared to the whacking that the boys got.

    The irony was, had I been selected, I would have refused to be a prefect as a protest against prefects being selected instead of elected!

    LOL :-) I can’t help laughing at my younger self; & at how much about me has not changed in all those years!

  42. Ken

    Respect for JK Rowling extends well beyond “the Left” – whatever you mean by that.

    Talk of “pedestals” is really rather silly.

  43. Socal and Oldnat

    Well Rosa parks anniversary might not be celebrated but she is remembered in my household at least. My daughters middle names are Rosa parks.

  44. Amber

    I was appointed a prefect – then promptly led a prefect’s strike when it was clear that only “middle class” students had been selected.

    We won.

  45. OLDNAT…………I have to admit to not having read the Harry Potter books, or even seen the films, so I can only comment on the high profile public figure that the author cuts, she seems like a nice enough lady. :-)

  46. @ Old Nat

    Unless I missed it, the article on pupil councils doesn’t say they should be elected by the student body rather than appointed by staff.
    8-)

  47. SoCal/Oldnat

    They’re called ‘School Councils’ south of the border. Served on my one all the years I was in my senior school.

    Consisted of a representative from each class, totalling about 20 in an average school, plus the head teacher and year heads.

    Lunch menus were redesigned, changing rooms were redecorated, PE formats were changed to give pupils the chance to try more sports (local clubs were invited round to give us introductions of non-school sports), there were more career presentations by speakers from colleges and local employers, public sector/military organisations (I remember lots of ooh’s and aah’s for the RAF’s swanky videos of fast jets and low-flying helicopters)….

  48. Ken

    With you right wing toadies It’s St Margaret of course.

  49. I remember listening to a conversation in which Stephen Lawrence’s parents were accused of being glory hounds for seeking justice for their son. It’s sickening.

    One thing about phone hacking of celebrities…when it gets to court they won’t be able to claim a “public interest” defence. Fishing for prurient stories, more like.

    People are going to jail for the illegal stuff. But the “free press” angle looks a bit weak when you see how they use their freedom to break groundbreaking scoops about Welsh footballers shagging their sister-in-laws.

    What freedoms are they defending, exactly?

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