Just back from the EPOP conference, so this is a rather brisker update than most Sundays! This week’s YouGov figures for the Sunday Times are CON 33%, LAB 43%, LDEM 10%, UKIP 6%, so back in the more normal range after the six and twelve point leads we saw last week. The rest of the poll looked at David Cameron, the reshuffle, planning and Heathrow.

Looking at the details of how people see Cameron, his biggest weakness remains being seen as out of touch. Respondents saw him as out of touch by 67% to 23%, although this was pretty much unchanged from when YouGov last asked in July. On other ratings there was a notable decline – Cameron was seen as weak rather than strong by 51% to 33% (down from July when the figures were 47% weak, 38% strong) and as having run of out of ideas by 57% compared to 26% who think he has plenty of ideas (again down from July when 52% thought he was out of idea, 32% thought he has plenty of ideas). His best (or least worst) figures was still being seen as likeable – 41% think Cameron is likeable compared to 45% who think he is not.

This month YouGov also threw into the mix whether people thought Cameron was a male chauvinist – only 27% of people did (overwhelmingly Labour supporters), 42% did not.

Moving onto the reshuffle, 32% of people thought it had made the government more right wing, 29% thought it has reduced the amount of influence that the Liberal Democrats had. Overall though the verdict was very much one of no difference – 9% thought it had changed the government for the better (almost all Tory supporters), 19% thought it had changed it for the worse (mostly Labour or Lib Dem supporters)…72% said no difference (55%) or don’t know (17%).

On the future of the coalition, YouGov asked a straight queston on whether people would prefer the coalition to continue, or for there to be minority Conservative government. The party results are interesting. Most Labour supporters said don’t know, as presumably they would really prefer neither, but of the remainder they were more likely to support a minority government… presumably as it would be less likely to last! Amongst the remaining Liberal Democrat voters a large majority (71%) preferred the Liberal Democrats to remain within the coalition. Amongst Conservative party voters 58% said they would prefer a minority Conservative government to the coalition.

The next set of questions were about planning. I’m always quite wary of these, since my experience is that the general public have almost no awareness of how the planning system works, and if you have to do quite a lot of explaining in a question you really risk measuring opinions that weren’t there to begin with! Anyway, general opinions of the existing planning system were very evenly split – 27% think it is too strict, 25% think it is not strict enough, 32% think the balance is about right.

Turning to the government’s specific ideas, 40% think extending permitted development rights for house extentions is a good idea, 44% a bad idea. People are slightly more opposed to softening affordable housing requirements, but it is still a farily even split (38% support, 45% oppose). The idea of spending money directly on building more affordable homes and guaranteeing loans to developers is much more popular – 65% support it with only 19% opposed.

Finally, on the topic of Heathrow 47% of people think Cameron delaying the decision until after 2015 is dithering, 33% think there is no hurry and the delay is the right thing to do. Asked directly if of they support or oppose the extention of Heathrow people are very evenly split – 32% support, 34% oppose, 33% don’t know.


181 Responses to “YouGov/Sunday Times – CON 33, LAB 43, LD 10, UKIP 6”

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  1. Anthony,
    Can you tell me whether YouGov has done the “which Pm is Cameron like” qustion before? Probably only of intereest to old farts, but that’s me.

  2. “Liberal Democrat voters a large majority (71%) preferred the Liberal Democrats to remain within the coalition”

    “Amongst Conservative party voters 58% said they would prefer a minority Conservative government to the coalition”

    …..

    Well I suppose if they were to be booted out of the coalition then they would become the Yeovil Tea Party but don’t mention expenses in or around Yeovil. ;)

  3. Does anyone know if (say, Lord Ashcroft) has done any polling around Yeovil?

    Steady as she goes so for the moment and we must conclude the two lead narrowings were blips (although 2 down one side and two up the other should not have led to misery and exultation, respectively.

  4. it’s almost a relief to see a poll in the middle of the range after all that flailing around last week.

  5. FPT – Nick P,
    What is the difference between Britain and the Britsih Isles?

  6. Last questions were very unsatisfactory. When asking about Royals, the answer ‘don’t care’ was not offered. Perhaps some forced themselves to answer ‘don’t know’ or gave up and gave one of the other answers, we’ll never know.

    On the coalition continuance, one was not given the answer ‘end coalition and force GE’ as an option.

  7. jim jam

    no idea. Want me to google?

  8. @AW

    Nobody asked you if you enjoyed yourself although the answer may have been impossible to answer truthfully.

    Socal (for instance) at his convention actually walked around Charlotteville (the first middle class American I ever have come across who walked anywhere).

    I once was on a boondoggle in Athens where my American colleagues took a taxi from the hotel in Syntagma Square to Praka (about half a km).

  9. Thanks Nick it is what i did but ON knows better and seems to think Britain and the British Isles are the same thing.

  10. @JimJam

    British Isles: the group of islands off NW Europe that belong to the UK and Republic of Ireland

    Britain (aka Great Britain): the biggest of the aforementioned isles that contains England, Wales and Scotland, but not Ireland

    Strictly speaking, they’re both geographical terms, although Great Britain is also a political construct.

    How long before Lab’s monotonously dull lead starts to erode? Not that I’m willing it. Any game changers in sight? Sigh …

  11. Postageincluded – no, never (or at least, not in a comparable form)

    Howard – Of course I enjoyed myself. I retained my undefeated record in the EPOP annual quiz

  12. @Tark,

    No, it’s the other way around. “Great Britain” is a geographical entity. If you are standing on the ground in Edinburgh, Leeds, Cardiff or Chigwell, the island you are standing on is Great Britain. You can hit it with a hammer, it’s a physical thing. It has geographical characteristics: the North part is granite, the South part is clay (hence no caving in Hampshire). It’s an island. Anglesey, the Isle of Wight, The Western Isles are not part of Great Britain.

    “Britain” is a nation, an ethnos even: a group of people who call themselves “us”. It’s a mental thing and you can’t hit it with a hammer.

    The “United Kingdom” (you know the full title) is a state. It has a head of state, a head of government and it has armed forces. It is a thing with defined borders (borders are important. I may have mentioned that… :-) ). It has a legal personality and can be bound by treaties signed by its head of state.

    If everybody on Earth died tomorrow, “Britain” would cease to exist but “Great Britain” would continue to exist. The “United Kingdom” would be deemed to continue to exist, having not been supplanted by another state.

    Part 2 will deal with something else: the concept of the realm.

    Regards, Martyn

  13. @Tark

    Part 2: the concept of the realm.

    Here’s a question that everybody knows the answer to, and everybody is wrong. How old is England?

    The clever person will go on about English unification in ~10th century, then the Norman Conquest, and Northumberland and Wales joining it. So far, so Wikipedia.

    But it’s wrong, because it’s a trick question.

    “England” as a state is as old as the concept of states, and they are far more recent: around about the 17th century, in fact. The cutoff point is the Treaty of Westphalia. Before then, the lines on the map didn’t denote countries, they denoted realms.

    A “realm” is a bunch of people headed by a Big Man, with the Big Man variously called a king, emperor, duke, tsar, whatever. Before Westphalia, “England” was an ethnos but the political entity was the “Kingdom of England”, a realm.

    The reason why I’m banging on about this is because fragments of the realm survive in places like the Isle of Man and Sark. They are not part of the UK but remain part of the Britannic Realm, rendering fealty to the British Crown.

    Hope that answers your question,
    Regards, Martyn

  14. It seems there is suffcient ambiguity for both Old Nat and I too be correct.

    I found this on project Britain which confirmed what i was taught at school.

    ”Is Great Britain the same as Britain?

    Sometimes people use the shorten name Britain instead of Great Britain, to mean the same thing, but really Britain only refers to England and Wales”.

    I accept though that many people do use Britain as another name for the UK (I don’t) hence ONs comment.

    Apologies to all for being like a dog with a bone but grrrr condescention is so annoying.

  15. @Martyn
    Crikey, thanks! I thought I had it all sewn up, but back to O Level history for me.

    When I teach undergraduates politics, England and France are the earliest examples of nation states that we use. Although Westphalia initially codified inter-state relations, England and France started centralising much earlier.

    Nevertheless, I stand corrected on GB and B. I noticed that ‘Team GB’ struck a slightly sour note in some circles over the Olympics as it excludes NI, although of course NI athletes can compete in Team GB if they don’t choose RoI.

    In terms of identity questions, I don’t mind the slightly nebulous ‘British’, and I like the way ‘British’ can be vague enough to exclude nonsense about blood and belonging.

  16. JIM JAM

    @”Apologies to all for being like a dog with a bone but grrrr condescention is so annoying.”

    It is-nearly as annoying as pedantry-so growl away. :-)

  17. ‘condescention’ is indeed annoying, almost as annoying as ‘extentions’.

  18. Re: which previous PM does DC most resemble?
    I am not surprised it has not been asked before.
    It is utterly fatuous and can produce no even vaguely interesting or informative result.

  19. Thanks Colin – I am done with the bone.
    Polldrums roll on conferences

  20. I see that the answers to “which previous PM does DC most resemble” question are heavily skewed to those incumbent in recent times. No big surprise. I wonder how many people thought he was like Lord North? Or even Spencer Perceval?

    Or did people think it was more about physical resemblance?

  21. @AW
    “Of course I enjoyed myself. I retained my undefeated record in the EPOP annual quiz”

    Very well done and i see you retain your enduring sense of modesty.

    I have only just caught up with Nick Harvey getting a knighthood. I cannot imagine to which depths politicians can sink, but they must, I suppose, exist. Apparently, it would have been ‘rude’ to refuse.

  22. KeithP

    to “which previous PM does DC most resemble”

    I would have gone for Lord Salisbury, my only surprise is that DC does not take the 1710 to Aylesbury each evening, first sliding into the waiting barouche parked nearby.

  23. @Tark

    You’re welcome

    Regards, Martyn

  24. @SoCalLiberal – ” …most conservative commentators were pointing out that even many of the second tier speeches at the DNC were better than the headliners at the RNC.”

    I’ll go along with that.

    The coverage here was not so comprehensive – just a two hour slice each day – so thanks to your post I went in search of the Antonio Villaraigosa and Deval Patrick speeches. Your Mayor talked about it being the most diverse and inclusive convention yet, and I do think there was something remarkable about it… the speeches were well prepared, but maybe the atmosphere contributed confidence and obvious enjoyment to the speakers performances. I liked his style.

    Patrick’s speech was powerful… towards the end he suddenly dopped tempo to talk about the Orchard Gardens kids and I thought he might lose momentum, but he timed the second upswing to perfection and reached a great climax.

    On Kamala Harris, maybe my mind did wander a bit… like most ‘Britishers’ slightly in awe of people with great teeth.

    At this point mention should be made of Obama reelection campaign co-chair, Eva Longuria, if for no other reason than the innocent pleasure that can be had rolling her name around in the mouth. The ‘Eva Longoria pets Jessica Alba at DNC’ sensation (it’s out there on YouTube folks) seems to have eclipsed the whole Bill/Barak in bro-hug, six back slaps, a back rub and another backslap thang. But is that good?

    Also liked Kerry Washington, though I haven’t seen her in anything… and of course the fiesty Scarlett Johansson, maybe she could run for president when she grows up.

    Seriously though, there will always be a significant number of political stategists from the UK studying US presidential election campaigns. This one merits special attention.

  25. Whereas VI polls in the UK do not seem to mark an important change since the last months, the main interest of the European electoral scene is now focused on Dutch snap GE of next Wednesday, Sept. 12. For the first time since the beginning of the campaign, Dutch Labour (PvDA) is given in a statistical tie with the senior gvt. partner, the “Orange-book style” liberals of VVD. Compared to the 2010 GE, it seems like a mere repetition (back then, VVD gained 31 seats and PvDA 30, whereas now both are between 32 and 35 seats). Nevertheless, in comparison with the beginning of the electoral campaign, there has been a tremendous shift toward Labour. In fact, from the very beginning PvDA was fighting for 3d place with far-right anti-Euro and Islamophobic PVV. In late August, the two parties were given at about 17-19 seats each, whereas the radical lefties of the Socialist Party (as in Eire, the Socialist Party in Netherlands is an extreme left one) seemed to have overtaken Labour as the stronger left-wing party and were competing with VVD for 1st place. Then, after 3 debates in TV where PvDA new leader D. Samsom was the clear winner, Labour first secured 3d place from PVV, then closed the gap with SP, then overtook SP and became again 1st left-wing party, and now it seems to do even better than in 2010, where it came second for less than 1%. Now there are 50-50 chances that it becomes 1st party ahead of VVD, but either way it is already seen as the winner of the election. In fact, the slight increase in VVD’s share of vote cannot compensate for the heavy losses predicted for both its actual partner, the Christian Democrats of CDA and its ex-partner, the PVV. The CDA, for the first time in Dutch electoral history, will probably have a single-digit score, and the PVV polls around 12-13% (15.5 in 2010). So a center-right majority is not arithmetically possible (politically it is already impossible, it was the PVV that pulled out of gvt and provoked the snap GE), therefore in any possible gvt (left, center-left or grand coalition) the PvDA is a necessary partner. The only thing that remains to be seen is whether Labour will come ahead of VVD even by a slight margin, in which case it is almost certain that D. Samsom will be the next Dutch PM, something totally unthinkable one month ago.

  26. Thank you for the excellent and fascinating Dutch analysis. Given France went left, it’s even more interesting that the Netherlands will also go left.

    The circle turns every few years…

  27. @Virgilio

    ‘Gilio! (to the tune of “Norm!” from “Cheers”)

    Admittedly that makes me Cliff Clavin, but there y’go.

    Regards, Martyn

  28. Thanks, Mr Wells. I suppose they were fishing for an interesting headline but found that people thought he was like Major, the last Tory PM, a result almost as dull as Major himself. Don’t think this question will be repeated soon.

  29. Martyn:

    So is even the Northern bit of France not a part of the British Isles? Surely Brittany MUST be.

    What was the point of the battle of Agincourt otherwise?

    Roll on the ole Scottish independence vote by the way. When it fails I think we should rename it “Northern England”.

  30. @PaulCroft

    It’s been done … :-)

    Regards, Martyn

  31. Martyn:

    ON will like the re-naming I’m sure.

    Maybe they could call the whole lot “North Northumberland”

  32. @Virgilio

    The only thing to rain on your lefty parade is that the same polls reveal 43% of voters in NL, undecided.

    Of course many of these will not vote, but it makes the ‘largest party’ outcome undecided.

    You are of course correct about the rocket recovery of the PvdA.

  33. @ Martyn & Paul

    I think Scotland has been called North Britain but not Northern England per Croftee’s suggestion. :-)

  34. @Paulcroft

    To be part of the “British Isles”, doesn’t the bit of land in question have to be an island? And fairly near the rest of them?

    Lumps of nearby continents don’t really count as islands, I think.

  35. They did in the good old days Keith. Have you not seen Eddie Izzard’s “Have youGot a Flag” sketch? Its brilliant.

    Anyway I think Amber is up for it so “Northern England” it shall be and we’ll just forget about France.

  36. Can’t see Cameron as Lord Salisbury. Salisbury was a master of inaction; he made doing nothing an art form. He’s no Dizzy either. Possibly a Pretty Fanny Balfour?

  37. @Jack

    “Thank you for the excellent and fascinating Dutch analysis. Given France went left, it’s even more interesting that the Netherlands will also go left.”

    Er, both France and now the Netherlands (if V is correct) will have gone *CENTRE* left.

    Just as the Trot melenchon did far worse then predicted at the start of the 2012 French presidential campaign, so the far lefties in the netherlands have collapsed in the polls the closer the election date has approached.

    T’were ever thus…

    :-)

  38. @Howard, Jack, Rob Sheffield
    Good morning, have a nice week, and wishes to everyone for a good new season.
    Of course the issue of which will be the 1st party in Wednesday’s Dutch GE is totally open, Howard you are correct in observing that the percentage of undecided voters is unusually high. My opinion is that both the two main parties, VVD and PvDA, will further strengthen their position, because of the very fact that the VI polls show this polarization. But what is already certain is that the PvDA has had an astonishing recovery from less than a month ago, and this proves that a strong campaign can overturn the pre-campaing VI polls. Unlike what happened earlier this year in Slovakia and France, where the victory of Social Democracy was predicted and the only issue was wether they would have OM (eventually this happened in both cases), in Netherlands no one would bet on a strong Labour showing. Even if VVD is first (which is totally possible, Ruute is the second most popular leader after Samsom and he benefits from the electoral bleeding of his actual of former partners (the junior partner curse strikes again!!), there is no possible government without the PvDA. Many political analysts speak about a new Purple coalition, i.e. a coalition between the two liberal parties, the right-wing VVD and the left-wing D66, and Labour, in the light of recent VI polls is the only one that is arithmetically feasible. An all-left coalition (Labour, SP, D66, Green Left and Party of Animals) is also possible, but it will be difficult for the “statalist” SP and the “libertarian” D66 to work together. Anyway, the leftward shift (either we call it center-left or left) is visible in the Netherlands (it is the first time that the 5 center-left and left-wing parties can have a majority, even if they do not form a gvt together), as it has been in Slovakia, France, and even Greece, with the rise of SYRIZA. Last but not least, the predicted catastrophic result of CDA is yet another incident in the black series of the EPP, making 2012 a real annus horribilis for them (all-time lows in Slovakia and France and predicted all-time lows in Lithuania and Romania later this year).

  39. @ Howard

    “Socal (for instance) at his convention actually walked around Charlotteville (the first middle class American I ever have come across who walked anywhere).

    I once was on a boondoggle in Athens where my American colleagues took a taxi from the hotel in Syntagma Square to Praka (about half a km).”

    Really? The first? Charlotte isn’t much of a walking city (it’s pretty sprawling) but they basically built a downtown area (it’s completely surrounded by a freeway) and that area was mostly easy to walk in though only in some small parts.

    When I’m in European cities, I walk everywhere and take mass transit everywhere (a city’s mass transit system tells you so much about a city’s people, culture, rythms, and energy). How old were the people you were with though who needed to take a cab for a half mile? In my family, my mom never walks and needs cabs for just a couple of blocks while my dad always wants to walk…..even if walking is totally unadvisable.

    LA is filled with great walkable neighborhoods….that all are easily connected by automobile! (Hence the expression about having to drive in order to walk).

  40. @ Billy Bob

    You should have seen this stupidity.

    http://reason.com/blog/2012/09/05/dnc-chair-villaraigosa-declares-super-ma

    “I’ll go along with that.

    The coverage here was not so comprehensive – just a two hour slice each day – so thanks to your post I went in search of the Antonio Villaraigosa and Deval Patrick speeches. Your Mayor talked about it being the most diverse and inclusive convention yet, and I do think there was something remarkable about it… the speeches were well prepared, but maybe the atmosphere contributed confidence and obvious enjoyment to the speakers performances. I liked his style.”

    His story is inspiring and compelling. He’s not always been the greatest speaker. Not always perfectly articulate. It was nice to cheer his mention of Westwood though. I think this chairing of the Convention was the capstone of his career.

    “Patrick’s speech was powerful… towards the end he suddenly dopped tempo to talk about the Orchard Gardens kids and I thought he might lose momentum, but he timed the second upswing to perfection and reached a great climax.”

    He really did.

    “On Kamala Harris, maybe my mind did wander a bit… like most ‘Britishers’ slightly in awe of people with great teeth.”

    Her speech didn’t get a positive reaction. My mom suggested to me that she’s not a strong speaker. I was happy that my mom and sister watched the Convention this year just to see if they could see me on television. Others saw me on tv but not them. She does have great teeth and she is a beautiful woman.

    “Seriously though, there will always be a significant number of political stategists from the UK studying US presidential election campaigns. This one merits special attention.”

    I don’t think JM was there though I suddenly wondered if he might be when I saw DM. Of course, there’s no guarantee that either one would have been friendly and posed for pictures (I’m not a potential voter nor a potential donor). I guess British politicians attend in part out of their role as political strategists. They can gain ideas from the themes and political attacks. Also, since we only do one once every 4 years and not once a year, they take on a greater meaning.

    I wonder if 2012 will go down with 1864 and 1936. Elections in which the public was quite unhappy and the country was mired in a great heaping pile of sh*t but the Presidents got reelected handily.

    I’m glad we had the celebrities that we did. I’m also glad that none of them decided to have arguments with chairs. The funny thing is (and maybe it’s from growing up in LA), I’m totally starstruck by politicians (and to a lesser extent, some judges and sometimes the occassional journalist) and I’m really non-chalant about famous actors and actresses. Eric McCormack (the guy who played Will on Will and Grace) sat in my aisle on the final night. My reaction was “meh.” But boy oh boy, waiting next to the distinguished gentleman from Oregon for a toilet stall….WOW…..and meeting Ed Rendell…..I could barely put words together to form a sentence.

    (This all begs the question: What is wrong with me?)

  41. “This month YouGov also threw into the mix whether people thought Cameron was a male chauvinist – only 27% of people did (overwhelmingly Labour supporters), 42% did not.”

    I stand with the 42%. :)

    @ Billy Bob

    “At this point mention should be made of Obama reelection campaign co-chair, Eva Longuria, if for no other reason than the innocent pleasure that can be had rolling her name around in the mouth. The ‘Eva Longoria pets Jessica Alba at DNC’ sensation (it’s out there on YouTube folks) seems to have eclipsed the whole Bill/Barak in bro-hug, six back slaps, a back rub and another backslap thang. But is that good?

    Also liked Kerry Washington, though I haven’t seen her in anything… and of course the fiesty Scarlett Johansson, maybe she could run for president when she grows up.”

    I think the two Presidents together said it all. There didn’t have to be anything more. It’s clear too that they seem to like each other far more now and that their dislike of each other has abated a good deal. That’s important. Did you see the picture today of the President being picked up a registered Republican body builder pizza joint owner who can bench press up to 350 pounds? It looks totally goofy yet also endearing at the same time.

    I did not see the Longoria/Alba petting thing until now but looked it up on Youtube just now. If JM had been there, I might have tried to do the same thing to him (but fortunately, I’m much too shy and reserved to have made a complete ass out of myself).

    As for Scarlett Johansen, all I can say is “you gotta get a chandelier!” (My favorite impression of hers on Saturday Night Live).

  42. @SoCalLiberal – “you gotta get a chandelier!”

    Wait a minute, what are you telling me?

    You already got marble columns? Phew! That place is gonna look like a mansion… like da king of England lives there or somethin’.

  43. Congratulations to Anthony on his EPOP success (was this one Pack-assisted?). You just know that the options for their version of “which past Prime Minister do you think David Cameron most resembles?” consisted of Spencer Compton, George Canning, Bonar Law and the 3rd Earl of Bute.

    The reaction in the ST poll to the proposed planning changes is interesting. I think it was Peewee who pointed out that the trouble with laxer planning rules is that, for every person you please, you annoy at least two of their neighbours and the results rather bear this out.

    Despite YouGov carefully wording the question to emphasise the limit nature of the changes (thereby giving more information in a poll than we got in the news stories) there is still a bare majority against the changes (44% to 40%) and this is particularly strong in the over-60s (50% – 39%) the group most Conservative policies seem to be directed towards. You can see it all producing vicious micro-battles and resignations from the Party all over the country – just so Everest double glazing can annoy us all with even more cold calls.

  44. Just a follow up and hopefully also for colleague Anmary who doubted my interpretation of Wilders party PVV as “Dutch UKIP /anti islam culture invasion’ party.

    I reproduce his latest words and translate. Rob S has some command of Dutch and can confirm my translation as reasonable. Wilders hopes to get 4 extra seats from VVD voters ‘behind the curtain’ (Dutch voters vote in a booth behind a curtain), what we would call ‘shy voters’ .

    He said about Samson, the Labour leader
    ‘Samsom is een grote islamknuffelaar, bijna net zo pro-Europees als Pechtold en ik las dat hij tien keer gearresteerd is’.

    ‘Samson is a big Islam hugger, almost so pro European as Pechtold (D66, the Dutch Liberal Democrats) and I read that he has been arrested 10 times.’

    So Anmary, I think I classed his PVV correctly. (I believe that Samson was a lot ‘leftier’ in his youth).

    The significance for we voters here is that it shews that there is a genuine choice for voters in NL that we are unable to enjoy here, due to our FPTP system. Would Respect (for instance) gain more seats on a PR basis? I think they certainly would. So might the BNP (although a 5% minimum would probably be too high).

    Would we want this? Over to you and would it not be great to have a proper UK PR debate, followed by a referendum? I think the starting position would be 50 50 at present, but another hung parliament could bring it on possibly?

  45. Top Hat
    ‘Salisbury was a master of inaction; he made doing nothing an art form. ‘

    Yes indeed, that was why i selected him as DC political lookalike. I just do not understand in these days of communication, why the fresher airs of Chequers do not beckon. Supplicants could otherwise spend an hour on the Chiltern train pondering their reception. By the time their taxi reached the house, they would probably have forgotten why it was so urgent to pester the PM.

    This is, you will gather how Howard would run the show, a bit like George Bush (in only that respect).

    ‘Now watch this drive’.

  46. Roger – EPOP was unusually Pack-less, so I had to win without my usual wingman. It was instead heavily Roger Scully-assisted.

  47. I wonder if these suggestions from some that Scotland could swing yet FURTHER to Labour in 2015 are correct.

    Quite frankly, if Labour gain seats like Argyll and Bute, Edinburgh West and East Dunbartonshire next time, ‘OldNat’, ‘John B Dick’ etc can count on my vote in the referendum after the next one (if that’s necessary!).

    Labour’s already massive Westminster dominance up here is completely unjustified and only exists due to the split Anti-socialist vote – i.e. the Scottish Tories being crap, to put it in the most polite possible way.

  48. calum

    I think you will find the “anti-socialists” will be shrinking onto the southern non-urban English Shires next time out.

  49. Shrinking because they’ve suddenly thought ‘Wow, Labour are fantastic!’ or shrinking because they think the Tories are crap and therefore not bother voting at all I wonder.

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