Tonight’s YouGov poll for the Sun has topline figures of CON 34%, LAB 44%, LDEM 8%, UKIP 8%, so bang in line with the leads of ten points or so that YouGov have been showing lately.

Meanwhile ComRes have their monthly poll for the Independent, which has topline figures of CON 33%(-1), LAB 42%(nc), LDEM 13%(+2), Others 12%. Changes are from ComRes’s last poll conducted by telephone a month ago, rather than their parallel online polls for the Independent on Sunday.

They also have one of my beloved “agree or disagree with this statement” question – in this case asking if people agreed or disagreed that “the Government is more to blame than the eurozone crisis for the lack of economic growth in Britain”. 43% of people agreed and 42% disagreed. To practice what I preach in the post below on how to report polls, this should probably be read in the context of similar questions from YouGov and Populus in recent weeks.

In the Sunday Times this week YouGov asked what single factor was most to blame for Britain still being in recession. 33% said the Eurozone crisis or global factors, 23% said the deficit left by the last government, 19% said the present governments policies or cuts, 13% said the banks for not lending money. Populus last month tackled the subject a different way, asking people to rate five different items seperately in terms of how much they were to blame for the present economic situation, and then taking those who rated each one at 8/10 or more. 64% of people blamed the behaviour of the banks prior to the credit crunch, 57% the crisis in the Eurozone, 49% the last Labour government’s borrowing, 47% banks not lending and 37% the current government’s cuts.

Finally ComRes also had a poll on people’s trust in various professions for ITV news. As usual in these polls doctors were top, trusted by 85% to tell the truth, they were followed by teachers (76%), judges (73%) and scientists (72%). At the bottom only 10% trusted bankers or politicians to tell the truth, 13% trusted journalists and 19% business leaders. And, before you ask, 27% of people trust pollsters to tell the truth, 41% do not!


56 Responses to “New ComRes and YouGov polls”

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  1. Mr Tyrie told the Beeb last night: “I’m certainly not going to want to run an inquiry that is in any sense partisan or perceived to be partisan. And I wouldn’t be prepared to participate if that were the case.

    “Indeed, if I don’t have the support of the whole House of Commons I wouldn’t be prepared to do it.”

  2. They are digging themselves a hole again!

    Osborne has appointed someone who seems to hate banking regulation to chair the inquiry into banking!

    Andrew Tyrie, Conservative MP for Chichester and chair of the Treasury select committee, co-authored a paper titled ‘Leviathan at Large‘, which was written in response to the Labour government overhauling City regulation with the creation of the Financial Services Authority (FSA).
    The bulk of the paper is focused on criticising financial regulation, with chapters titled: ‘The risk of over-regulation‘, and ‘The danger of oppressive and arbitrary regulation‘
    He specifically attacks the government bill of the day as failing to “strike the right balance” and say it was “biased in the direction of over-regulation”.

  3. For the funniest examination of the silly Citizenship tests see

    http://blogs.independent.co.uk/2012/07/02/confessions-of-an-immigrant-knowledge-of-life-in-the-uk/

    The opening paragarph reads

    ‘So I finally took the plunge, and naturalised as a British citizen, having lived here for twenty-five of the twenty-seven years of my life. Naturally, I’m one of those dastardly hordes of Swiss immigrants who’s come over here to deprive British workers of British jobs for British history lecturers. What should have been an affirmatory and celebratory experience was instead a combination of bureaucratic nightmare and Pythonesque farce’

    And continues in that style, not least pointing out the history errors in the book people are meant to study…

    Terrific…

  4. @ChrisLane / Colin,

    I haven’t read the Rochdale report, but I don’t find either of those statistics surprising, and I don’t really find the statistic about children being placed away from their home area all that disturbing.

    Very often it is a positive thing that a child is placed in a distant foster home or residential centre. Many children in care have a quite destructive relationship with their home area – whether it is the pull of their original abuse family, or the peer pressure of the “old crowd” they used to hang out with.

    Sometimes a move from urban Holloway to rural North Wales can make all the difference to a child who is in danger of drifting into drugs, crime and/or prostitution.

    Cost is of course also a factor. The running costs for residential care are staggering. If all the homes were provided in the areas where the children live I expect the costs would be doubly staggering.

    Finally there is the issue of supply. Areas of the country that are well supplied with stable families in large homes tend to provide fostering for areas of the country with unstable families in inadequate housing.

  5. @PAUL BRISTOL

    “The bulk of the paper is focused on criticising financial regulation, with chapters titled: ‘The risk of over-regulation‘, and ‘The danger of oppressive and arbitrary regulation‘
    He specifically attacks the government bill of the day as failing to “strike the right balance” and say it was “biased in the direction of over-regulation”.”

    Appointing such an individual is actually quite astute. Firstly, the individual is put into the position of having to actually come up with a solution, rather than criticise others. Secondly, if the individual is really against over-regulation, but understands that the banks cannot be trusted to self-regulate, then they might be more inclined to come up with the correct regulation.

    That’s my hope, at least.

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