The Conservatives brief post-Jubilee recovery seems to have passed. After a month of YouGov’s Labour leads averaging at twelve points last week we saw three polls in a row with leads down into single figures, enough to suggest it was more than mere sample variation.

However, today’s poll has Labour’s lead springing right back up again, with topline figures of CON 31%, LAB 45%, LDEM 9%, UKIP 9%. While it’s possible that this lead could be an outlier and we’ll see smaller leads again tomorrow, it makes a lot of sense that the lead should return to its pre-Jubilee position. The fact that there were some Jubilee celebrations may have made people feel generally better about the ways things are going or taken minds off the government’s problems, but the fundementals hadn’t changed.


213 Responses to “YouGov/Sun – CON 31, LAB 45, LD 9, UKIP 9”

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  1. Amber

    “X-Breaks for tonight’s poll look more sensible than yesterday’s.”

    Yeah – but 7% for the LDs in Scotland? Far too high! :-)

  2. Amber I agree and appreciate the lack of ‘EU opinion’ gratuitous claptrap. It seems that Labour has a certain solidity and as it is in opposition, unless it makes the mistake of getting too involved in policy, it should be able to hold firm.

    It also does not seem that there is any dissident stuff from which the left so often suffers.

  3. @Hal – “The effect on UK politics is going to be massive… hard to say exactly how, though.”

    Absolutely. Intuitively we might normally expect trouble in Europe to benefit Tories, but I think the risks are so great this isn’t necessarily clear. The other factor is that we have a Tory PM. Capitalising on mishaps and misfortunes is much easier in opposition, and I think if a Euro sceptic Tory party was in opposition now, I suspect they would be having a field day.

    However, in power, you’ve got to pick up the pieces and make things work. I can see great conflicts for the Tories here, as they could be in a position of vetoing proposals that could save Europe, but risk accusations of collapsing economies for dogmatic purpose.

    And whatever happens, there’s the economy.

    I have an increasing sense that by 2015 or a little after, the EU could look radically different, and unthinkable things will be much more thinkable and doable.

  4. @Gary Gatter

    “A 10% Labour lead, so given yesterday’s 14% it looks like 12% is holding.”

    Maybe. The most recent polls have the lead at:

    10, 9, 9, 8, 14, 10

    …which puts yesterday’s 14 as an outlier, rather than the 12 holding. We’ll see tomorrow I suppose.

    However, looking at today’s data the trend is that the Con VI is on the up from last month, and the Lab VI is on the down. Not by much though.

    UK – h ttp://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/844/91290633.png

    Con – h ttp://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/403/cons.png

    Lab – h ttp://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/812/labd.png

    Indeed, the Lab trend in London shows an upward trend, however this is due to yesterday’s anomalous ’52’. The previous day was 44, and to day was 45, so I changed yesterday’s one to 45 and the trend took a downward slope.

    Obviously the trend data includes outliers, so always has to be treated with caution.

  5. HAL / ALEC……………..As a Tory, ( Conservative ) I should be fearful of the ramifications of an EU meltdown, but for some reason I experience a frisson of excitement when I contemplate potential chaos, I’m a banker of course, so I sense opportunity in disaster. :-)

  6. To give a little bit longer perspective to this poll, I had a look at the this poll compared with the last YG poll before the 2010 election for two geographic areas – London & S England : rest of England & Wales.

    Party, South England, Rest
    Con, 40% (-3%), 29% (+1%)
    Lab, 36% (+6%), 51% (+23%)
    L_D, 10% (-10%), 7% (-27%)

    UNS has always been a dodgy concept. This suggests that it is of even less value now.

  7. Makes you wonder whether some of the pension schemes will actually payout in 20,30 or 40 years time, when people retire.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/pensions/9327537/Black-hole-in-final-salary-pensions-hits-all-time-high.html

  8. Alec, Ken

    I don’t buy the idea that fiscal integration is going to solve the problem. It might in some theoretical world, but in fact the eurozone is never going to agree on how to do it, much less implement it in time. The worse the economic situation gets, the more political support for Europe is draining away. The idea that any electorates or national parliaments are going to say “yes” to immediate fiscal integration is fanciful.

    The best outcome I can see is that following a large-scale banking collapse, the target2 payment system is switched off over a weekend and each country uses only its own euro notes. Worse outcomes involve the collapse of democracies and/or armed conflict.

    I don’t see any scenario where there is a shiny new EU constitution and the UK has to have a referendum on it. It’s going to be far more serious than that.

  9. @ Chris Lane

    “Theologically, ‘marriage’ is between one woman and one man for life. So there is a clah between ‘canon law’ and statute law.”

    Do all theologians in Britain agree on this?

  10. SOCALLIBERAL.
    Good Morning.

    I do not know whether all theologians agree with the words of scripture and the church fathers, who include women as well.

    I wish my church would adopt an eirenic approach on this issue, and focus instead on good liturgy, spirituality and social justice; including justice for the un born.

    The day may well come, however, when a priest will be taken to the courts for refusing to preside over gay marriage, and here we will have a clash over what equality and liberty actually mean.

  11. So I have some happy news to report.

    Today a special election was held in Arizona’s 8th Congressional District to fill the vacancy left by Representative Gabby Giffords’s (D-AZ) resignation. She survived her assasination attempt and she appears to be recovering but the recovery has been slow and she couldn’t continue on in office. The Republicans were hopeful that their 2010 candidate Jesse Kelly (who narrowly lost in 2010) would pick up the seat. He’s the one who had his opponent’s image as a shooting range target and spent this campaign sending out flyers of himself with assault rifle in hand. Now I don’t mean to be the sensitivity police here but when you are running in a special election to replace a Congresswoman who was gunned down in a mass murder and you are running against a special election opponent (Ron Barber) who was present and injured at the shooting, that’s in poor taste.

    Anyway, with 86% of precincts reporting, here are the results for AZ-8:

    Barber, Ron, Democratic Party Candidate: 98,544 votes (53%)
    Kelly, Jesse, Republican Party Candidate: 84,957 votes (45%)
    Manolakis, Charlie, Green Party Candidate: 4,385 votes (2%).

    Democratic Hold. :)

    I don’t know what the future for Giffords holds but I am hopeful that she will make a recovery and come back to politics. She was well enough to make some campaign appearances for Barber (her former legislative aide) towards the end of her campaign. Representative Barber is likely a placeholder till November when AZ-8 will become AZ-2. Redistricting (boundary changes) will make AZ-2 a more Democratic seat than the current AZ-8 (which is nominally a Republican seat in terms of voter registration and presidential preference).

  12. Rain again here.

    I recommend Polly Toynbee’s article yesterday about poverty. I am not a natural fan of this Toynbee, but it is a very fine article, imo.

    Secondly, the Child Commission’s report is very frightening, and I hope ‘society’ takes action on it.

    Thirdly, from my forbears’ Land of Ireland, much more happy article about the big gathering in Dublin this week.

  13. @Hal – “I don’t buy the idea that fiscal integration is going to solve the problem. It might in some theoretical world, but in fact the eurozone is never going to agree on how to do it, much less implement it in time. The worse the economic situation gets, the more political support for Europe is draining away. The idea that any electorates or national parliaments are going to say “yes” to immediate fiscal integration is fanciful.”

    I would agree. I’ve posted previously that I consider the far right a much more worrying long term threat to European society that radical Islamists, and attempts to pursue fiscal integration without matching political and social integration will simply create a pressure cooker waiting to explode. It will create the final transfer of the crisis, from banks, to sovereigns to politics. Far right nationalism here we come – and it isn’t as if Europe doesn’t have form on this.

    I suspect that in the next few months we will start to hear about alternative structures for Europe, and increasing numbers in countries like our thinking aloud about what life outside the EU would really be like.

    We’ve been told for decades that this would be a ‘disaster’, which presumably must amuse the Norwegians, whose lives are clearly disastrous, but now hyperbole is crashing into reality, and definitions of ‘disaster’ are being redrawn in people’s minds.

    I don’t think the EU leadership realise how fragile the whole facade of acceptance within Europe has been, and they have convinced themselves of their own immortality. Oddly enough, I see the German refusal to pay for the weaker EU countries as a symbol of this – if the German’s are going to play the Good European game, why should anyone else?

  14. SoCalLiberal

    The Republicans were hopeful that their 2010 candidate Jesse Kelly (who narrowly lost in 2010) would pick up the seat. He’s the one who had his opponent’s image as a shooting range target and spent this campaign sending out flyers of himself with assault rifle in hand.

    Are you serious? He behaved like this in the special election? And 45% of people still voted for him? – even 45 people is shameful. Given that Fox will always be reassuring such people that they are the persecuted ones, no matter what outrages they commit, maybe something should be done to show them what it’s like to be on the receiving end for once. Though of course, like all people who like to portray themselves as rugged individuals, they’ll go running to Mummy as soon as anything goes wrong. See the case of Jeremy Clarkson and the kitchen window (Manx reference obscure to everyone except me).

    (from yesterday 3:41) I admire Hollande and Royal for the way in which they conduct themselves and how sophisticated their relationship has been. I think it’s amazing that they stay on good terms and serve as political allies even though their relationship ended

    It’s all your fault. If you hadn’t tempted fate like that none of this would have happened:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jun/12/french-president-partner-tweets

  15. ALEC

    @”Essentially, the ‘headbangers’ who have always been highly critical of all things EU, have in many ways been vindicated.”

    They have-who are the “headbangers” now?

    They are either still droning the old mantras of Euroland like some disfunctional robot who’s programme has seized up -like Jean-Claude Juncker; or strangely silent -like old Hush Puppy Clarke-all round Eurofan & blokey bloke .

    The day we get any inkling of reference to unfortunate euro facts from Hush Puppy , let alone an apology for all that claptrap, will be the day hell freezes over.

  16. Is Ed brave or totally mad?He`s practically made sure that 34%of the print media and Sky are going to support the conservatives at the next election

  17. SMUKESH

    Leveson was quick to respond that he wasn’t going to start suggesting rules for media competition-that is someone else’s job.

    He said his own brief was “mushrooming”-a hint that Ed can forget it.

  18. Some arguments against Greece exiting the eurozone from Özlem Onaran and Michael Roberts are outlined here:

    h
    ttp://systemicdisorder.wordpress.com/2012/04/04/charting-a-path-out-of-impasse-for-greece-and-other-countries-part-1/

    It should be said that in other posts Dolak seems to prefer an Agentinian solution for Greece which would involve a default and a return to the drachma. He talks a lot about neo-liberal policies which destroyed the Argentinian economy… though I think the real laboratory which so influenced Reganomics and Thatcherism was in fact Chile.

  19. @COLIN
    `He said his own brief was “mushrooming”-a hint that Ed can forget it.`

    Yes,Leveson probably thinks that to make his report too broad is a sure way of condemning it to the bottom shelf in a dusty file cabinet.

    But it is being reported that if Leveson won`t do it,then Ed will offer curtailing media monopoly in Labour`s manifesto…this is nothing short of declaring war on Murdoch…And he has supported the winning party in the last few elections apart from the last one which the Tories almost won.

  20. I hope no one will be too offended if I juxtapose “systemic disorder” with an earlier post on this page:

    “I experience a frisson of excitement when I contemplate potential chaos, I’m a banker of course, so I sense opportunity in disaster.”

  21. The Lib Dems leadership is clearly spinning like mad over the vote to refer Hunt to the adviser on the ministerial code. It’s the lead story at the moment on both Guardian and Telegraph websites. I’m not sure how well this sort of things will play with the electorate though.

    Firstly “look how brave we are – we’re going to abstain” is hardly to most convincing rallying cry in the world. Secondly the whole thing is very Westminster bubble. People may feel that a Lib Dem ‘revolt’ would have been better directed elsewhere. Though how abstaining in a way that means that Cameron will still win can be portrayed as ‘Coalition at war’ (Telegraph) rather confuses me.

    Clegg and his coterie really have to work hard to start to distinguish the Party within the coalition – if only to retain the increasingly disenchanted support they do have. I don’t think this sort of phony war will help, though a coordinated vote with Labour might have.

  22. SMUKESH

    John Major was at pains to tell Leveson that if the three main parties don’t get behind his proposals they won’t be enacted.
    JM was typically honest in saying that he didn’t act on the Calcutt Report, because he couldn’t get it through Parliament.

    I don’t think Leveson will go anywhere near competition law.
    He has enough of a job trying to produce a balance between freedom of the press, and right to privacy , and an acceptable regulatory regime to go with it.

  23. Ken

    … I’m a banker of course, so I sense opportunity in disaster.

    If you wanted a single sentence which exemplified the dreadful mess that Western capitalism has got itself into, it would be this.

  24. @COLIN
    `I don’t think Leveson will go anywhere near competition law`

    I agree and he asked Ed whether referring this task to the appropriate authorities(Competition Commission I assume) would be enough.

    According to the BBC,Cameron told Clegg noone cares about Leveson,so this doesn`t bode well for his report.

  25. BILLY BOB…………..Alternatively, I could assume the foetal position, thumb in mouth, until the bad things go away. :-)

  26. Indecisive though it looks, I think abstaining is the right decision for the Lib Dems (or at worst the least bad decision).

    If the Lib Dems had voted with the government on a pro-Murodoch’s friends issue, it would have undone all the distancing they’ve managed between themselves and the Tories. Plus the rank and file Lib Dem membership would be up in arms about that and could trigger a mass departure.

    However, if they voted with Labour on this, it could lead to Jeremy Hunt resigning. Publicly arguing with your coalition partners is on thing, getting rid of fellow coalition ministers is quite another. If the tit-for-tat escalates to that level, the Tories and Lib Dems would both end up as losers.

  27. @Ken

    Frankly, I wasn’t expecting you to be offended… more worried about the sensitivities of other people on this board. ;)

  28. SMUKESH

    Well we will see.

    I must say, you can easily gain the impression that Leveson has just been an outlet for a few lovies, & a lot of politicians to moan about the bad press they got-and a forum for the Murdoch haters to sound off.

    From what I have heard from Leveson , he does seem to have accepted the great importance of freedom of the Press. I get the impression that his focus is on providing real sanctions & recompense for ordinary people who are wronged, but cannot afford a court battle with a wealthy newspaper.

    Either way the PCC has been roundly condemned as hopeless by everyone.-so something has to change.

  29. @CHRIS NEVILLE-SMITH
    `Indecisive though it looks, I think abstaining is the right decision for the Lib Dems (or at worst the least bad decision).`

    With hindsight I agree…If this was end 2013 or early 2014,their decision might be different.

  30. ROGER MEXICO…………It’s a good job I didn’t take up parachute, or lifeboat, manufacturing, in fact, most business propositions are predicated on the opportunities arising from potential disaster, in one form or another, even social services exist to benefit. I suspect because of my stereotype you doubt my motivation rather than my calling. :-)

  31. Colin

    “JM was typically honest in saying………”

    Now, for those who have read my many posts over the years, will know that our old friend Mr Major doesn’t rank very highly in my pantheon of political heroes, so you won’t be surprised to discover that I think you’re being a little generous in your praise here! I thought his testimony to Leveson yesterday was vintage Major meets Mr Pooter; a mix of anecdotal reminiscing more suited to after dinner speeches at the Oval, revisionist and self serving versions of history, particularly on Black Wednesday and, quite possibly, some absolute whoppers, certainly if Kelvin McKenzie’s version of events is true.

    And I wouldn’t fall for all the self pity too. Remember, here was a man who sat back in admiration and scarcely concealed glee as he watched Murdoch’s newspapers monster Neil Kinnock mercilessly in the run up to the 1992 election. No thoughts then of controlling the overweening press or delivering pious homilies about bullying media tycoons.

    I thought he was a very impressive witness at Leveson yesterday and lived down to my expectations of him entirely.

  32. Oops. Obviously that should read “unimpressive” not “impressive” in my previous post when talking about Major! lol

  33. CROSSBAT11
    `I thought he was a very impressive witness at Leveson yesterday and lived down to my expectations of him entirely.`

    I quite enjoyed his evidence and found it entertaining and revealing…Regarding stopping Kinnock`s abuse by the media,Major probably changed his mind post-1992 when the boot was on the other foot.

  34. CROSSBAT11.
    Hello again, after a wonderful beach run, and before going to teach, half day today.

    I agree about JM, and remember well the attacks on Neil Kinnock.

    The ‘Back To Basics’ slogan was discussed yesterday, and he denied that this was a puritanical theme. However, The advisors around him turned the B to B theme into a campaign on sexual mores, which backfired I think.

    It was possible years ago to get a laugh from V1 Formers, referring to John Major liking curry for dinner…

    On other matters of the GE in 2015: Just my intuition following observing every GE since 1964. Dead heat IMO as we say, is beckoning.

  35. SMukesh

    Is Ed brave or totally mad?He`s practically made sure that 34%of the print media and Sky are going to support the conservatives at the next election

    Well I suppose he reckons they were never going to support him anyway, so he’s got nothing to lose. He can also now point to attacks on him from that quarter as being motivated by the fact that he wants to rein them in. And it may get him kudos from the other media groups who are clearly annoyed at the special relationship that developed between Cameron and News International.

    And it’s clear that the public support him. YouGov did a poll for the British Journalism Review (f/w 7-8 May)

    http://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/e0eksv1qzk/YG-Archives-BJR-Murdoch-110612.pdf

    They asked:

    As you probably know, Rupert Murdoch is the founder and chairman of News Corp, the company that ultimately owns The Times, Sunday Times and Sun, and is the largest shareholder in Sky Television. Recently a majority of MPs on a House of Commons Committee declared that “Rupert Murdoch is not a fit and proper person to run an international company”. A minority of MPs disagreed. Do you think Mr Murdoch is or is not a fit and proper person to run an international company?

    Only 16% thought he was a ‘fit and proper person’, 56% thought not (28% Don’t know). The nay-sayers included Conservative supporters at 43% to 27%.

    There were also a number of questions about the sort of stories newspapers should publish. There is overwhelming public support for publishing details of corporate or public service wrong-doing, but a majority (60-80%) feel that the details in various scenarios of the private lives of celebrities “should NOT be published”. Of course this is not the same as saying that publishing it should be illegal, but it’s an interesting insight.

    Interestingly even most of those saying such stories should be published say that they are “not necessarily in the public interest”.

  36. VI figures back to some kind of normality ie fluctuating around a 10-11 Lab lead.

    ………………..

    It seems to me that EM and Lab will benefit from a debate and vote about JH, and DC/Cons and NC/?Ds will suffer in the mind of joe public. This is the case IMO regardless of whether or not the vote succeeds.

    NC will look weak – yet again. Nothing new there I guess but frankly joe public will think he should have had the b*lls to vote with the motion.

    DC and the Cons will look like they are engaged in a cover up. In particular DC will be damaged by allowing the vote to take place. He needs to avoid it and refer JH for investigation.

    The sad thing about this affair, is that it does nothing to improve the way joe public perceive MPs, the office of the PM and indeed Parliament.

  37. CROSSBAT11

    @”revisionist and self serving versions of history”

    Well he would certainly have stood out from the pack had he not indulged.

    Indeed there was an example of staggering proportions from another former prime minister before Leveson very recently.

    But we musn’t prolong this exchange because a) Anthony won’t like it -and b) it is futile, because all “history” can be expressed with different emphases & conclusions.

    Professional historians earn a crust by doing so.

    Your version Black Wednesday is your version. John Major’s version is his version-at least he was there.

    :-)

  38. @ROGER MEXICO
    It is interesting that though the public feel that gossip is not in the public interest though a proportion of people feel it should be published anyway…Maybe we are at a turning point when it comes to tabloid news…But the circulation of the SUN suggests otherwise.

  39. Ken

    Nowt personal here – it’s human nature to get the most out of the current scenario, whatever that might be.

    Seems to me though that the logical and historical lesson is to bring the banks to heel. By all means let them speculate to gain advantage, but let the world fall in on THEIR heads when they f*** up, rather than have the rest of us to pick up the pieces and the tab.

    I’d have thought that a 21st Century Glass-Steagel type approach is the absolute minimum that should come out of the current catastrophe. My take (as a lefty, natch) is that the disparities of reward vs risk that we have allowed to develop over the last 30 years are morally obscene and (if history is your guide) a good metric of a capitalist system gone wrong. I suspect (or hope at least) that an outcome of our Little Depression will be the realisation that such disparities must not be allowed to develop again.

  40. Ken

    It’s nothing personal or about motivation. But it’s simply not true that “most business propositions are predicated on the opportunities arising from potential disaster” – never mind from actual disasters. Of course some people can always make considerable amounts from these situations, but in a healthy economy they should be the exceptions to normal economic activity, not the rule.

    And for bankers to become the exemplars of such an approach is to turn things on their head. Bankers are supposed to be all about stability and boringness. When they start thinking of themselves as buccaneers things are definitely going wrong. Though I don’t think pirates demanded to be bailed out by the taxpayer when things went wrong. :P

  41. @Chris Neville-Smith – “Publicly arguing with your coalition partners is on thing, getting rid of fellow coalition ministers is quite another.”

    This seems to miss the point – the vote is most certainly not about ‘getting rid of a minister’ – it’s about calling for an independent review of his behaviour.

    I think the Lib Dems have made a mistake her, although I can understand the pressure within a coalition system. Effectively, by abstaining they have guaranteed the government a majority, which in real terms belittles their protestations that they disagree with Cameron on whether Hunt should be referred.

    It also demonstrates a lack of principle – either you belief the PM is wrong not to refer the matter, in which case you must vote for a referral, or you don’t, in which case you support.

    Sadly, the Lib Dem stance degrades public faith in politics even further by saying you are aware that there is a problem but you are allowing it to pass unchallenged. Not good.

    It is also worth bearing in mind that Hunt has not faced any investigation at all over his handling of the ministerial code. Leveson pointedly didn’t do this, so the matter remains untested. Even Tory committee chair Bernard Jenkins has indicated he feels the matter should be referred, so I do feel the Lib Dems could have should more spine over this.

    On Important Matters; Italian bond rates on the rise – contagion now spreading to Italy. Cyprus negotiation for a loan from Russia – looks like they need a bail out but are seeking better terms than they will get from their EU friends.

    Vast amounts of cash withdrawals from Greek banks being reported in the run up to the election, and EZ industrial production figures show a 0.8% fall.

    Absolutely everything heading the wrong way, and Euro leaders obsessing about new treaties like a bunch of rabbits in the headlamps discussing which one should be nominated to ask the speeding juggernaut to slow down. Laughable.

  42. @CHRIS NEVILLE-SMITH
    `Indecisive though it looks, I think abstaining is the right decision for the Lib Dems (or at worst the least bad decision).`

    I disagree, but to keep on-topic re. polling, I think it leaves them open to so many accusations by their opponents (lacking principles or the courage of their convictions, hypocrisy, speaking with forked tongues, tacitly supporting the conservatives while saying something different, etc.) that it could tarnish their brand further and haunt them on other issues. I suspect that it could lead to a further softening in LD VI or at least make a recovery less likely.

  43. @ Ken
    “I should be fearful of the ramifications of an EU meltdown, but for some reason I experience a frisson of excitement when I contemplate potential chaos, I’m a banker of course, so I sense opportunity in disaster.”

    ……. just like an arms dealer making capital out of other peoples misery. Have you seen that film ‘Lord of War’?
    Not trying to cast you as Nicholas Cage, but have you no shame? ;-)

  44. @statgeek

    The figures for the last week or so all seem to be within moe rather than outliers. Plus bank holidays seem to give strange figures and so maybe last weeks polls should be taken with a small pinch of salt. I always feel that trends are a bit more important than any one days poll. Averages are all well and good but I prefer AWs method of weighting them, as we are looking at a snapshot and older polls should not be taken as being as relevant to current public opinion as a more recent poll. Likewise polling from different pollsters should be given greater weighting than regular polling from the same pollster. AW gets a bit of stick from some posters for not updating the average on the right on a regular basis, but I think you will find that He updates when polls from other pollsters come in, which makes sense. Otherwise we would end up with a YouGov avaerge rather than a polling average.

  45. Phew. Paul Mason’s blog on the Greek situation is rather sobering. Either his contacts are upping the ante ahead of the Greek election or we really ARE on the edge of the precipice.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-18424279

  46. Westminster politics as shown by todays PMQ’s is just an opportunity for each side to say that the other side are rubbish.

    This not a partisan comment, but I don’t find the exchanges between Cameron and Miliband of interest any more.

  47. @Chris Neville-Smith

    Your argument seems predicated on the assumption that an investigation on the basis of the ethics rules applied to cabinet ministers would result in Chris Hunt being fired for cause.

  48. ” Chris Hunt ”

    Who he?

  49. I can’t possible imagine why I subconsciously changed Jeremy Hunt’s first initial there.

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