There are two new polls in the Sunday papers. YouGov’s weekly poll in the Sunday Times has topline figures of CON 34%, LAB 42%, LDEM 7%, UKIP 9%. So far all three YouGov polls since the Jubilee weekend have shown Labour’s lead dropping into single figures, having been averaging at around 12 points before the Jubilee.

Meanwhile Angus Reid have a new poll in the Express, with topline figures of CON 29%(nc), LAB 43%(-2), LDEM 9%(nc), UKIP 9%(+1) – changes are from Angus Reid’s last poll at the end of May. Angus Reid tend to show the biggest Labour leads of all the pollsters (a reverse from the last Parliament, when they showed the biggest Conservative leads), so while the 14 point Labour lead is large, it is actually marginally smaller than the record 16 point lead they were showing last time round.


183 Responses to “New YouGov and Angus Reid polls”

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  1. @Jay,

    I think we should distinguish between the knockabout politics of the main parties, and actual real opinions of sensible people like us here.

    Of course the Tories blamed Labour for the crisis. That’s what oppositions do. Of course Labour blame the Tories for the recession. That’s what oppositions do.

    I personally have always said I thought the last government’s reaction to the crisis was reasonably adept. I do think they overspent during the good years – contributing to the problem (and leaving us less able to respond to it), but I don’t think that’s the core problem. I also happen to believe that the economic competence that Brown used to crow about was nothing of the sort, and that he was simply riding the wave of an unsustainable global boom, right up until it crashed onto the beach.

    But to claim that the current difficulties for the economy were caused by Osborne is, in my opinion, simply untrue. There might well have been slightly higher growth if the spending reductions had been lighter and slower (it’s impossible to know for sure). But the growth figure, and its attendant “Recession/No Recession” dichotomy, is not the sole measure of success. It is possible to have higher growth, but to be worse off than if you had lower growth, if the measures you took to increase growth cause problems elsewhere.

  2. @Amber,

    Hasn’t Colin pointed out that Spain is “A Tale of Two Banking Systems”. The proper, commercial banks like Santander are examples of good practice. It is the small, politically-compromised regional banks that are basket-cases. This bailout is not for the likes of Santander.

    You’re right that Spain seems to have been given an easy ride, compared to the other PIIGS. I suppose that’s the advantage of being a big country not a small one. As the old adage goes,

    “If you owe your bank £1,000 it’s your problem. If you owe your bank £1,000,000 it’s their problem”.

  3. AMBER STAR

    @”Throughout the tribulations of Iceland, UK, Ireland & US the Spanish banks were oft times alluded to as paragons which the others should have copied.”

    THey were and are. Spain’s multi-national players , like Santander were well regulated & capitalised.

    @”Then almost out of the blue, we hear they are in dire straits”

    Different banks-the 40 plus regional savings banks-the cajas.
    Responsible for over 50% of bank lending in Spain.
    These were badly / unregulated , mired in corruption and politically directed lending. The collateral on their massive real estate loans collapsed as Spanish property prices fell by 30% .The Spanish State started forcing them to merge-the largest merger being Bankia. It went to the market for capital, and within weeks was in trouble again. Bankia triggered a review of the whole rotten pack of cards & this massive bailout.

  4. And speaking of Spain- Andrés Iniesta really is a sublime footballer.

  5. @OLDNAT

    “I’m sure that among Anthony’s comments on polling misapprehensions there is one about people who say “the poll must be wrong. None of my pals think that”. :-)

    I was drawing a tentative conclusion from polling evidence, whereas you …. (goes off, shaking head in despair).”

    I wasn’t referring to ‘my pals’. I was referring to people in general in the passing. Normal people in shops. People shopping. Some have been flying union flags from their cars. Some have union flags in their gardens. Generally there has been a ‘feed good’ factor is all.

    Using polls as the only litmus test just as bad as reading too much into a poll. I hope your despair is short lived.

  6. On a seperate note, this article is quite interesting:

    h ttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-politics-18385522

    Flags and moods.

  7. Statgeek

    Nah. That answer doesn’t work – unless, of course, the community in which you shop, walk by gardens etc is a perfect microcosm of Scottish society.

    In any case, such exhibitions are presumably in favour of the monarchy (hardly surprising since polling has suggested that position attracts around two-thirds support in Scotland – less than the three quarters in England & Wales, but still very significant).

    My post referred to the contrast between support for the monarchy, and antipathy to the listed Jubilee Celebrations, as reflected in the poll.

    You choose to dismiss the polling evidence because it doesn’t equate with your personal experience. You are, of course, free to do so – but it would be unwise to expect approbation for your position on a polling website.

  8. Statgeek

    Interesting bit of research. The responses can presumably vary according to local circumstances.

    For example, overheard in B&Q, Paisley when a customer was confronted by a row of Union Flags at the entrance – “******, Is this the ******** Rangers store?”

    The impression given was that he didn’t view the Union Flag with positive feelings. :-)

  9. FRENCH GE 1st ROUND
    Socialists+Greens+various left 40% (+ 8 from 2007), all-time-high
    Left Front 7% (+3)
    TOTAL LEFT 47 (+11)
    UMP+various right 34.5 (-11), all-time-low
    National Front 13.5 (+9)
    MD-Center 2 (-5.5)
    Far Left 1 (-2.5)
    Others 2 (-1)
    Projection in seats after runoff (17 June) if usual vote transfers apply:
    Left 305-350
    Right 230-270
    Center 0-2
    NF 0-3

  10. Neil

    The issue is that there has been virtually no debate in the UK and the EZ over the last couple of years on the risks that go along with concerted and co-ordinated Austerity. Osborne has been a key player in the lack of debate. There Was No Alternative.

    We are now seeing across Europe just what those risks were. Of course a proportion of our problems are due to the problems in Europe, but the Europeans have only applied the Austerity approach that Osborne has preached for 4 years. He can hardly claim innocent surprise over the outcome! And that’s before we discuss the fact that we went double-dip a good 9-12 months before most of the rest of Europe.

    It all fits the same narrative. His coining of the “Deficit Denier” phrase was a genius tactic, in eliminating debate. But it also eliminated the possibility of having a more nuanced approach after the debate was won, and as such was bloody lousy strategy.

  11. @OLDNAT

    “You choose to dismiss the polling evidence because it doesn’t equate with your personal experience. You are, of course, free to do so – but it would be unwise to expect approbation for your position on a polling website.”

    Strange. I didn’t ask for approbation. Nor do I seek it. I just extended my experiences. Like I already said, polls are not the only source of opinion on a subject, and certainly not such a subject. My experiences were that most seemed neutral to the jubilee, and in favour of the monarchy. If that grates with your latest poll, I can’t help that.

  12. @Neil A

    Where I take issue with Osborne’s latest comments is that the Eurozone economies that he is trying to blame have been run by governments that by and large share his political outlook and have been signed up to exactly the same sort of austerity agenda as that he has been applying here for the UK. We aren’t members of the fiscal pact but might as well be for all the difference that it makes.

    Obama seems to be making much more sense of it all. Here are his comments of a few days ago, as reported by the Daily Telegraph:

    Mr Obama warned that the cuts in public spending being made by many European governments are actually making making it harder to address the debt crisis.
    “The problem is that when an economy is still weak and a recovery is still fragile and you resort to a strategy of ‘let’s cut more’,” he said.
    Spending cuts mean public sector staff are laid off and investment falls.
    “If you’re doing all those things at the same time as consumers are pulling back because they’re still trying to pay off credit card debt and there is generally weak demand in the economy then you get on a downward spiral where everybody is pulling back at the same time,” he said.
    “That weakens demand and it further crimps the desire of companies to hire more people. And that’s the pattern that Europe is in danger of getting into.”
    He added: “As some countries have discovered, it’s a lot harder to rein in deficits and debt if your economy isn’t growing.”

  13. @Phil,

    Obama is certainly more of a Keynesian than Osborne (or Merkel, or the IMF). As a Keynesian yourself, obviously that will make sense to you.

    I think we should also see Obama’s remarks through the prism of the election campaign in the US. The dividing line is very largely on public spending cuts there, so you wouldn’t expect him to be embracing examples of austerity elsewhere as best practice.

    Personally I’d rework the last sentence of your quotation.

    “It’s a lot harder to reign in deficits and debt if you’re not trying to reign in deficits and debt”.

  14. Statgeek

    “polls are not the only source of opinion on a subject”.

    Very true! You will be pleased to know that I view your experiences as having precisely the same value as those of the gentleman entering the B&Q store.

    You have both added to the sum of human knowledge (though one comment was more amusing than the other). :-)

  15. Well in my very humble opinion,a large number of people who were not
    Entirely interested in the jubilee,may well have taken advantage of the long
    Whitsun break,and may have only just come home.perhaps therefore the poll
    On monday or even Tuesday might be a more reliable version of where we
    Stand.

  16. Anthony,

    Thanks for that on the Express Poll.

    My reading is that it probably a fairly small sample and it might not even be weighted for Scotland.

    Even then although the write up is about majority for a referendum in Scotland the numbers indicate that Scotland is still less Eurosceptic that the Uk overall.

    I have to say that nobody at the Scottish hutch of the Express seems to have read your advice on how journalists should use polls.

    Peter.

  17. Oldnat

    The Union flag looks much better without the blue bit and with the welsh dragon in one corner. The flag has already been designed in preparation, so it is looking quite positive for the SNP.

    Looking forward to the debate, when it starts for real. I think many people outside of Scotland, will be arguing for Scotland to leave. It would not surprise me that if they polled people in England, Wales and NI, that it would probably be atleast 60% in favour of independence.

  18. R huckle
    The uk flag would not look good with the ddraig goch on it or any other symbol of Cymru on it,the best thing that could happen to the uk flag and the uk it self would for it be consigned to history

  19. Well, even as a fairly strong anti-Tory, facing the possibility of perpetual right wing government without the friendly Scots voting in Labour MP’s, I’d still vote for an independent Scotland.

    Then build a proper Hadrian’s Wall and get offended at Scots people living in England and buying up oor hooses.

  20. @Neil A

    I see no reason not to take Obama at face value. But whatever his motives, the record of the US economy is all the more impressive over the last two years when comparisons are drawn with Europe.

    The trick is to implement austerity measures at a sufficiently limited and measured pace to ensure that confidence in an eventual recovery doesn’t collapse and lead to an exponential collapse in private sector demand and negative growth.

  21. @mfcymru

    Forgot about Welsh nationalists for a second.

    My apologies.

  22. PAULCROFT

    Thanks for trying to gift us a significant part of Northumbria and Cumbria. While these folk from the English Marches would be welcome in an independent Scotland, it really is a matter for them.

  23. “… if they polled people in England, Wales and NI it would probably be at least 60% in favour of independence”

    Not according to a three-day-old ComRes… “people in England and Wales want Scotland to remain part of the UK by a margin of two to one. Asked whether Scotland should separate from the rest of the UK to become a fully independent country, 28 per cent agree, 57 per cent disagree and 15 per cent are “don’t knows”:

    h
    ttp://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/england-and-wales-want-scots-to-stay-in-the-union-poll-reveals-7821241.html

  24. @ Colin

    THey were and are. Spain’s multi-national players , like Santander were well regulated & capitalised.
    ——————————-
    I have my doubts. The ‘bad’ banks which you allude to top out at $40bn; Spain needs $100bn to recapitalize its banking system.

    IMO, you do need to recapitalize a banking ‘system’ to 2.5x the audited trouble areas, if it can be neatly split into good & bad per your comment & article link. Either the entire banking system, no exceptions, has issues & they are going to be swept into ‘one bad bank’ or this is a ploy by Spain to secure a bigger share of the bail-out fund than they actually need.
    8-)

  25. BILLY BOB

    ” “people in England and Wales want Scotland to remain part of the UK by a margin of two to one”.

    Not surprising really. Milliband has already told them that they will be economically poorer when Scotland leaves.

  26. Some signs already of market scepticism over the Spanish bailout. It seems that the use of the ESM, for internal EU political reasons, may yet scupper the chances of Spain accessing capital, as the ESM terms are that the bail out is treated as a priority, with other lenders taking subservient rights.

    This means any new lender will be at the back of the queue if things go wrong, and may actually end up making it harder for Spain to stay afloat.

  27. @Alec

    Do you share my impression that the length of time that the financial markets retain confidence in the various bailouts in the Euro area is diminishing with each successive bailout?

  28. @OldNat

    You might well convert most of us here to the cause of Scottish Nationalism if you extended Scotland’s territorial ambitions even further to covet most of England bar a relatively small part centred around the tidal reaches of the Thames.

  29. Phil

    You may be interested to hear the views of a professor – originally from Sussex, now at St Andrew’s Uni – explaining why he (and some of his friends from England) are likely to vote Yes for independence (15 min interview).

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01jhp6x/iPM_09_06_2012/

    He’d prefer to save Britain, but sees that as impossible, so ensuring that appropriate values are protected in Scotland is the next best thing.

  30. Independent reporting new poll (Comres ?) showing record Labour lead, as voter flock away from coalition parties.

    Could not find details of the poll.

  31. ole nat

    I said a PROPER Hadrian’s Wall – ergo [that’s Roman] I was thinking further mcNorth.

    Might need to be a bit North of Glasgow actually so that your footy team can play in a proper league, with other teams that can play, and not win by 600 points every season.

  32. @OldNat

    Being serious, significant regional and local autonomy would suit the West Midlands fine. But if I lived within a part of the UK that had already achieved that in spades, I’d be looking only for enhanced independence through loosened UK ties with the EU as well as retaining an independent currency whose monetary policy is set according to the needs of the country that I live in.

  33. @Paul Croft

    You meant the Antonine Wall then.

  34. R Huckle – nope, no new poll in there. It’s just their “poll of polls” (i.e. an average of other published polls in the last month – so basically it’s just picking up the higher ICM, MORI etc polls we’ve had over the last month)

  35. Phil

    No. Hadrian’s would be best after all – its only a bit of scrubland [and Berwick] anyway, plus Celtic would get demoted to the championship and there’d be cross-border feuding again [or visiting London as they call it these days]

  36. Phil

    I suspect that some of the confusion about Scots (and NI) autonomy that exists in England, is that no one ever really explained that, while legislation had to be passed through Westminster, our domestic governance has never (ever) been from Whitehall.

    On the few occasions in the 18th/19th century when this was attempted there was political revolt (quiet, civilized, but effective) in Scotland, and Whitehall had to cede control to Scotland.

    1999 simply saw the re-establishment of legislative control over what was already administratively devolved (or protected by the Act of Union).

    As for the West Midlands (part of Mercia, I presume) – to have retained control over your own affairs probably required a formal union with other parts of England much later than actually occurred. IIRC Cnut was your last independent ruler, and he was more concerned with keeping his Scandinavian based empire together, to pay much attention to the needs of Mercia.

    You allowed London too much power, too early. Your prospects of effective autonomy are very limited, if you keep voting for politicians who continue to see advantage in vesting power in Westminster and Whitehall.

    As for us, the UK and the EU, I have never seen a rational explanation of why we are better being represented in the EU by the Westminster Government, rather than being represented directly.

  37. Paul Croft

    If it’s the Hadrian’s Wall line, then Newcastle United would join the SPL.

    Doubtless that would cause you little concern. Arsenal is probably already too far north to be included in civilized society (OK maybe they shouldn’t be thought of as being in civilized society if they played in Dover). :-)

  38. @ Paul Croft (11.35)

    “its only a bit of scrubland [and Berwick] anyway”

    Paul, I strongly object to your comment above. As a geordie I firmly maintain that Northumberland has some of the best coastline and countryside in England. If you are not familiar with the Cheviots then I suggest you make a visit and experience some wonderful, if isolated, countryside. The Northumberland coast is the best in the UK bar none. Shame we don’t have the weather to enjoy it.

  39. @ Paul Croft (11.35)

    “its only a bit of scrubland [and Berwick] anyway”

    Paul, I have strong concerns re your comment above. In fact, I originally wrote this in stronger terms but it seems it was moderated.

    As a geordie I firmly maintain that Northumberland has some of the best coastline and countryside in England. If you are not familiar with the Cheviots then I suggest you make a visit and experience some wonderful, if isolated, countryside. The Northumberland coast is the best in the UK bar none. Shame we don’t have the weather to enjoy it.

  40. Paul Croft ,

    Thank god you didn’t mention Yorkshire!

    Peter.

  41. Much as I groan whenever I see the subject of ‘Scottish independence’ raised in every fifth post, this cannot go unmentioned:

    It has been in the news today that the SNP have “proof” that Scotland would be “the 5th richest country in Europe” if independent.

    They are claiming this is based on Eurostat data alone, when it really is a figure produced by the SNP also using data from the ONS, National Records of Scotland and something called the ‘Scottish National Accounts Project’, a unit set up by the SNP to “better calculate Scottish economic data”.

    They also claim that this is current data based on “the latest GDP per capita ranking table produced by Eurostat” but there is no mention that this actually means 2008-09, before the banking collapse that required bailouts of biblical proportions.

    Amber, I think you might enjoy that.

  42. @ Neil A

    “I do think that the view that the recession in the UK is “nothing to do with the Eurozone” is several times more absurd than blaming the EZ crisis for it exclusively.”

    I completely agree. Even the U.S. is affected by the problems of the Eurozone. It’s totally going to affect your economy. EZ countries are among your top trading partners. They also provide employment options for many Brits willing to go abroad. They also provide a huge base of travelers for tourism, which is a major part of your economy. Plus, given London’s role as the center of the global finance industry, disruptions in the Eurozone are going to cause economic pain for Britain.

    Your leaders were smart not to avoid going into the Euro. But even though you’re not in the Eurozone, you’re definitely affected by it.

  43. @ Virgilio

    “FRENCH GE 1st ROUND
    Socialists+Greens+various left 40% (+ 8 from 2007), all-time-high
    Left Front 7% (+3)
    TOTAL LEFT 47 (+11)
    UMP+various right 34.5 (-11), all-time-low
    National Front 13.5 (+9)
    MD-Center 2 (-5.5)
    Far Left 1 (-2.5)
    Others 2 (-1)
    Projection in seats after runoff (17 June) if usual vote transfers apply:
    Left 305-350
    Right 230-270
    Center 0-2
    NF 0-3”

    Congratulations!

    Don’t let it get to your head though. Work hard over the next week to bring home the victory in the second round. Now, the first round requires candidates to reach 50% +1 in order to win outright. Are there any seats that you can already project winners where candidates won over 50% of the vote? And any surprises at all in seats where you will see right wingers facing other right wingers or seats where you will have left wingers facing each other? I suppose you’ll have to wait for next week for any big upsets.

    Here’s another question. The French left gained, the UMP lost. But the National Front has gained, almost as much as the UMP has lost. Where are they gaining their votes from? Is the French Left gaining from UMP voters switching over? Or are they gaining from the voters of other parties, particularly the centrist voters?

    I think one thing I’ve noticed about French elections is that usually after a Presidential election, voters will go ahead and give the National Assembly to the victorious party in the Presidential race. The only exception seems to be 2007 where the Socialists gained seats but that seems to be more of a rebound from the terrible 2002 results.

  44. Steve

    There are some inaccuracies in your post.

    The figures were not produced by the SNP, but by the Statisticians Group of the Scottish Government.

    “All statistics branches in the Scottish Government are part of the Government Statistical Service (GSS) which comprises the statistics divisions of all major departments in the UK, Scotland and Wales plus the Office for National Statistics, which has a co-ordinating role.”

    To suggest that they are producing figures on behalf of a political party presumably means that you believe every statistic produced by the UK ONS is produced by the Conservative and Lib Dem parties.

    The Scottish National Accounts Project is not “a unit set up by the SNP”, but a continuous development of the work of the Scottish Economic Statistics Consultants Group (SESCG) which was first brought together in 2001 under the then Labour/LD Executive, and which was itself a development of the statistics division of the former Scottish Office

    As the Chief Economic Adviser noted in 2008, when introducing SNAP “There has been considerable discussion at SESCG over the past few years about how we can improve the measurement of change in the Scottish economy over time; how we improve coherence between short-term and longer term estimates; how we might speed up the production and improve the quality of key statistics; and how we harmonise different economic statistics, produced for different purposes, into a holistic package.”

    The latest OECD data is from 2010. It includes GDP calculated by expenditure, income and output approaches.

    http://stats.oecd.org/index.aspx

    I’m surprised that Kenny Gibson MSP asked for the 2009 data (which is specifically identified in the table), and not the 2010 data which was available from the Statisticians.

    h ttp://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/0039/00390896.pdf

    You will note that this data also places Scotland in 5th place in the EU table.

    The Scottish Government are not “claiming this is based on Eurostat data alone”. Both the Parliamentary answer specifically state that “This estimate has been produced using data from Eurostat, the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the National Records of Scotland (NRS), and the Scottish National Accounts Project (SNAP)”.

    Which leaves the only accurate part of your comment as “ I groan whenever I see the subject of ‘Scottish independence’ raised”

  45. @ Old Nat

    “1999 simply saw the re-establishment of legislative control over what was already administratively devolved (or protected by the Act of Union).”

    And I never got that. I think that explains much of my own confusion about Devolution and the role of the Scottish government.

    How many initial changes did Devolution bring to Scotland? That’s what I’m curious about. I have a feeling that the number of changes to Scottish policy has increased in recent years, especially with the SNP in charge. But back in 1999, I wonder how much the government actively sought change versus maintaining the status quo.

    By contrast, I look at the District of Columbia after the Home Rule Act in 1974. The citizens of the DC(having been halfway given the right to self-determination) enacted some major sweeping changes that they could not do under unelected federal control. In that case, DC in many instances was forced to create brand new institutions or radically remake old ones to actually have quasi-state like agencies. It wasn’t merely an issue of simply putting elected representatives in charge of existing organizations and allowing citizens to vote on their leaders (what a novel concept!). A lot of the government had to be created. It’s also why this act came to being in 1974 even though JFK and LBJ were the ones who began the process of democratization in the 1960’s.

    Similarly, when I look at the West Hollywood independence movement, independence for that city brought almost immediately some major sweeping changes by hey had citizens who finally had the opportunity to self-govern. Even though they continue to rely on services from the County that they gained independence from, the city had to create new governmental bodies out of whole cloth in many instances. Especially in light of the need to enforce new laws that citizens enacted within days of independence.

    In Scotland, these governmental agencies already existed (in many cases, they were operating differently than sister agencies in Great Britain).

  46. AMBER

    “The total exposure of Spanish savings banks to real estate and building amounts to 217 billion euros ($297 billion), of which 100 billion euros ($137 billion) is classified as “potentially problematic,” the Bank of Spain said today.”

    Bloomberg

  47. Last time France had a far left government was 1936. Not a happy experience

  48. Appears Cameron is very forgetful.

    http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/politics/4365514/David-Cameron-left-his-daughter-aged-8-down-pub-after-lunch.html

    And he left his 8 year old daughter in a cads den !

  49. @ Phil

    “I see no reason not to take Obama at face value. But whatever his motives, the record of the US economy is all the more impressive over the last two years when comparisons are drawn with Europe.

    The trick is to implement austerity measures at a sufficiently limited and measured pace to ensure that confidence in an eventual recovery doesn’t collapse and lead to an exponential collapse in private sector demand and negative growth.”

    The problem is that Obama doesn’t control all of the U.S. economy and every governmental decision that will affect it. So even though the federal government has not done any kind of austerity, many states are (a good chunk of the stimulus was to temporarily delay this). In fact, our economy has had private sector job gains for the last 27 months. But out monthly jobs gains numbers have been less than that due to public sector job cuts. Every single state except for one (Vermont) requires itself to have a balanced budget. This has been hampering the recovery.

    The problem with the stimulus of 2009 is that it was far too small. It was also unfocused and ladden with a great deal of spending that was for pet projects and fulfilling campaign promises, rather than for stimulative spending. Now, we can’t be entirely blamed for that. For the last several decades, we have not thought in terms of big infrastructure projects. We avoided them as too costly and too much work and effort. I look at a lot of neccessary mass translit lines that have gone unbuilt even though they were much needed. When the stimulus came into being, suddenly there was money to build these things but with the way that we do planning (very differently and far more slowly than in Europe), we couldn’t just suddenly jump and start building these massive projects. The Second Avenue Subway in NYC is finally being built thanks to stimulus money. But they’ve been trying to build that line since the 1920’s. The plans were there, the objections gone, it was easy to build. Building other things…like a nationwide high speed rail network…..that takes time and you can’t immediately spend money on it.

    The Republicans’ embrace of austerity is little more than oppositional disorder. The Tories are idiots to adopt any policies from Republican talking points as Republican policies can basically be boiled down as nothing more than racism. Basically, they can’t stand to see a black President in the White House. They still can’t believe he even got elected. Therefore, they resolve to oppose whatever he proposes or supports….even if what he supports is traditionally non-controversial stuff that is decidedly bipartisan or even what they used to support and embrace. This includes deficit spending, which they started to notice and care about on approximately January 20th, 2009.

    They’ve gone psycho and are emboldened by the fact that general discontent among the public, especially instant gratification Millenials, seems to drive up their votes (or drive down the votes of their opponents). Ramblings of racist psychotics generally don’t tend to be very good or accurate advice.

    And btw, I suspect that if Mitt Romney wins this year, there won’t be any move towards any deficit cutting in 2013. In fact, I think there is far more likely to be a second stimulus.

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