The full tables for the YouGov/Sunday Times poll are now up here, covering the budget, fuel strikes and party donations.

On the regular leadership trackers there is a sharp fall for David Cameron, down to minus 27 from minus 11 a week ago. This is his lowest approval rating as Prime Minister (and I think as during his time as leader of the opposition too, though I don’t have them all collated in one place. I think his lowest then was minus 26). Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg’s ratings are also down slightly, Miliband to minus 41 (from minus 37), Clegg to minus 53 (from minus 46).

YouGov repeated the overall budget question from last week now there has been a further week for news of the budget to sink in (and for people to row over pasties… a move the poll found 69% in disagreement with). A week ago 24% thought the budget would be good for the economy, 34% bad. That’s now fallen to 13% good, 45% bad.

Turning to the fuel strike, 25% would support a strike by fuel tanker drivers, 52% would oppose it. If it did go ahead, two thirds of people (66%) would support using the army to deliver petrol supplies. On the government’s handling of the strike threat so far, an overwhelming 86% of people think they have handled it badly (59% think they have handled it “very badly”). This includes 78% of Tory voters who think they have handled the strike threat badly.

On party funding and donations, the figures suggest people are equally negative towards both the two main parties. 68% think donors have a lot or a fair amount of influence over Conservative policies, 69% think the same about Labour; only 25% of people trust David Cameron to be honest about his relationships with Conservative donors, only 24% trust Ed Miliband to be honest about his relationships with Labour donors.

68% of people think that British politics are very (21%) or fairly (47%) corrupt, 56% think it is probably true that policies have been changed in exchange for donations, 80% think it is probably true that honours have been given in exchange for donations. On the specifics of the Cruddas case, just over half (53%) think that he was telling the truth and the Tory donors really would get preferential access and influence.

Moving forward, just over half (53%) would support a cap on individual donations to parties, with 63% and 62% supporting caps on business and union donations respectively.


371 Responses to “Full report on the YouGov/Sunday Times survey”

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  1. Hmmmm…..when was the last time that all three main party leaders were this unpopular?

  2. If the ratings slide continues,there could be a headline declaring Ed Milliband as the most popular leader amongst the three…Cameron`s ratings still quite high amongst conservatives perhaps indicating that ` cash for access` is factored into the Tory vote

  3. Well this is no surprise. Career politicians are not popular, as they are seen as out of touch, with the general public !

    The calibre of the current crop of leading politicians is pretty poor, because many have not had jobs in the real world and many have come from privileged backgrounds.

    If you listen to the debates in the House of Lords and compare them with the House of Commons, you wonder whether it is a good idea to have another chamber full of the same people as the HOC. The great thing about the current HOL’s is that it is full of people with an immense amount of knowledge and wisdom.

  4. R Huckle – wouldn’t really describe Miliband’s background as ‘privileged’. Son of immigrants and state-schooled. Lived in a fairly expensive house in London but certainly not privileged by any means.

  5. For Cameron to take a 16% drop in net approval and Miliband not to make any gains should really worry Labour – in the same way that the press viciously turning on the government but not then backing Labour should also be worrying. [1]

    If Government approval continues to drop, and along with it Cameron’s approval, but Miliband’s doesn’t start to improve I think there will be more serious calls for him to step down.
    And while the Blairites will call for his resignation at the drop of a hat, the rest of the party do need to seriously consider the option.

    On the press itself – there could be even more trouble ahead over the fuel crisis as it’s not just the telegraph picking up the ‘playing politics’ angle – both The Sun and Mail are running with the same ‘exclusive’ “A bit of fuel panic is not a bad idea” quote (which makes me wonder if it’s LibDem briefed) and if the press narrative sticks and the strike doesn’t go ahead then the government will probably end up taking all the blame.

    [1] Who they would back is another question entirely – if not Labour and not the LibDems, could the press try to engineer a ‘UKIP is our only salvation’ campaign, especially as we approach the Scottish referendum?

  6. @ Bobby501

    “Hmmmm…..when was the last time that all three main party leaders were this unpopular?”

    The last time we had a deficit of over 11% that had to be sorted out while also simultaneously dealing with massive consumer debt and a huge financial crisis right on our doorstep.

    Until living standards start rising again – which isn’t going to be until next year at the earliest – popularity of any kind is going to be in short supply.

  7. MJONES
    To be fair – Ed M may not have come from a monetarily privileged background but he definitely came from a politically privileged background.
    There’s no chance Ed would be where he was today without his father being who he was – in the same way that Cameron, Osborne, Clegg & co are in the same position.

  8. @ Muones

    I think son of North London intelligentsia does qualify as privileged.

    Going to a comprehensive was merely the choice of his parents.

    He grew up in a middle class household in a wealthy area of London.

  9. In this poll,UKIP,Greens and Respect have all gone up indicating some level of disillusionment with the two main parties…I sense a Euro veto moment coming up shortly and also pressure on Milliband to deliver a balancing act

  10. TINGEDFRINGE
    `If Government approval continues to drop, and along with it Cameron’s approval, but Miliband’s doesn’t start to improve I think there will be more serious calls for him to step down.`

    People underestimate Ed`s role in government approval slipping…Had he not scored on Budget day,the news coverage would have been about how useless he was,given the drop in income tax for higher earners…He took the focus off himself and placed it exactly where it should be-on Osborne and Cameron.

    The Bradford by-election setback has stopped the media from backing Labour…They`ll wait for the May elections to see which way the wind is blowing before they back Ed.He does need to come up with a plan to stop Respect becoming a factor in Asian areas

  11. I think the real problem is that none of the messages provided by the three mainstream parties and their leaders is at all palatable to the electorate.

    They just don’t want to believe that none of the answers to our current problems are easy ones that don’t involve blaming someone other than themselves for the mess we’re in plus spending a whole lot of money that we just don’t have.

    There is a lot of free floating anger and frustration out there that has yet to coalesce around any particular movement or party.

    Thankfully I think we have sufficiently balanced media that no-one is able to create a bandwagon that enough people will want to jump on.

    However, there is more potential for polarisation to extreme left and right than at any time for decades.

  12. “He does need to come up with a plan to stop Respect becoming a factor in Asian areas”
    And the smartest plan would be ‘engage with Respect’ in the same way that he should be engaging with the Greens.
    As support for the three main parties drops over time (this has been a decades-long situation), Labour need to start making allies with those who share a similar vision for the country – they have nothing to fear from Respect (or Green) wins in certain areas if they have mutual support for certain shared policies.

    I’m not saying that Labour should give up on those areas where these third-parties would do well – but to turn these people in to enemies (and alienate their voters) would be the same mistake they’ve had with dealing with the libdems (and their voters).

  13. ROBERT C
    `I think the real problem is that none of the messages provided by the three mainstream parties and their leaders is at all palatable to the electorate.`

    Maybe a coalition between UKIP and Respect at the next election perhaps

  14. Shaun Ryder to advise the government on class…Aren`t there any working class Tory MP`s who can provide advice?

  15. “Maybe a coalition between UKIP and Respect at the next election perhaps”

    A coalition between a group of xenophobic right wing little Englanders and a group radical Muslim youth disaffected by a what they view as a decade of wars on Muslims?

    That really would be a match made in heaven.

  16. Shaun Ryder to advise the government on class…Aren`t there any working class Tory MP`s who can provide advice?

    I thought it was the Guardians April Fool

  17. REDRIDING
    `I thought it was the Guardians April Fool`

    Oops…that makes sense

  18. HOODED MAN
    Thanks…Cheered me up

  19. TINGEDFRINGE
    `I’m not saying that Labour should give up on those areas where these third-parties would do well – but to turn these people in to enemies (and alienate their voters) would be the same mistake they’ve had with dealing with the libdems (and their voters).`

    The problem of engaging with Respect is that you might end up alienating the white voter if you are seen as kow towing to the Muslims…As regards the Greens,I see Jenny Jones,Greens mayoral candidate has already endorsed Ken Livingstone for London Mayor,so perhaps this is happening already

  20. Ukip invisible but now on 7%.
    LD largely invisible during the week (apart from Ed Davey’s “Fill up, fill up, top up” intervention) now on 8%.

    UKIP
    1997: 0.3% (Referendum Party 2.6%),
    2001:1.5%
    2005: 2.2%
    2010: 3.1%

    EU elections:
    (1994) 1%. (1999) 7%. (2004) 16.1%. (2009) 16.5% – in second place.

    Pearson campaigned for the Conservatives in 2010 and offered to stand down all Ukip candidates in return for a referendum, so expect more pressure on Cameron, not least from his own back benches, in the run up to the next election. Difficult to balance that with continued cooperation from LDs.

  21. @Tinged:

    I’ve been thinking about a some sort Lab-Green co-operation for a little while. Assuming the boundary changes fail: if Labour let the Greens hold Brighton Pavilion in return for anti-coalition Green support in (say) Cambridge or either Norwich seat, both parties come out well electorally. There’s already a certain level of cooperation (e.g., the recent London Green endorsement of a second preference vote for Ken) and doubtless tactical voting going on in various places.

    I’m skeptical of whether Respect have enough to offer Labour in a similar deal for the next election. Their electoral machine is much weaker than the Green one at a fundamental level; if a few key people retired tomorrow, you’d probably never hear from Respect again. I feel that if there’s a threat from the left to Labour, it’s going to come from the GPEW and not Respect.

    The question is how willing Labour is to work with exogeneous leftist organisations, and how willing they are to work with Labour. There are reasons to doubt both, but I think that there are manifest benefits to it.

  22. @TingedFringe

    “There’s no chance Ed would be where he was today without his father being who he was – in the same way that Cameron, Osborne, Clegg & co are in the same position.”

    I think you’re overstating things a little here, certainly in Miliband’s case. Like most of us, we inherit some of our father’s interests and there’s no doubt that the Miliband brothers will have acquired their initial interest in politics from their parents but to then claim, as you do, that there is “no chance Ed would be where he was today without his father being who he was”, is just the sort of hyperbole and misplaced certitude that sometimes brings this blog into disrepute. How can anybody know this? Ralph Miliband wasn’t anything to do with the Labour Party and was deeply antipathetic to it. He was a Marxist intellectual with no leverage inside Labour at all. His zeal for politics probably inspired Ed, but to suggest he owes his position as Labour leader to his father is, frankly, a risible notion. Not only guilty of fratricide, but a beneficiary of nepotism too. Is there no end to Ed’s crimes??

    ” For Cameron to take a 16% drop in net approval and Miliband not to make any gains should really worry Labour – in the same way that the press viciously turning on the government but not then backing Labour should also be worrying. [1]”

    Again, too much overstatement for my liking here. The press hasn’t “viciously” turned on the government at all. They’ve heavily criticised them, quite rightly, for recent pratfalls and mistakes, but their instincts remain sympathetic and largely supportive. What on earth makes you think that they would suddenly back Labour at this stage in the Government’s life-cycle? In fact, what on earth makes you think that the Mail, Mail on Sunday, Express, Sunday Express, Sun, Sun on Sunday, Times, Sunday Times, Telegraph, Sunday Telegraph etc etc would be backing Labour now, or ever? Why should Labour be “deeply worried” about right-wing newspapers not “backing” them? I expect you’ll soon tell us that the current Pope should be deeply worried that he hasn’t yet had an endorsement from Ian Paisley.

    As for the approval rating movements for the three party leaders, I don’t share your cause for “deep worry” either. Miliband and Clegg are still mired in unpopularity, but when the sitting PM plunges as significantly as he has in such a short space of time, why should a Leader of the Opposition, or his supporters, be “deeply worried” that he hasn’t become an immediate beneficiary? Approval ratings aren’t interchangeable in the way that voting intentions are and, even if I was a party leader who would rather like to be more popular than I was, or a supporter of such a leader, I’d still be cheered and not worried if my direct rival was starting to plumb similar depths!!

  23. TF

    To ‘make common cause with Respect’ is one of the daftest, most nonsensical posts I have read on here in a long time.

    If certain sections of the community want to vote for apologists of fascist dictators, for supporters of terrorists and homicide bombers and for anti Semites then that is their moral funeral.

    EdM gets many things wrong- but I can tell you right now: laying down alongside Hezbollah-Hamas UK won’t be one of them.

  24. While deploring the election of Galloway, there is one good thing to come out of it. If the old clan-based voting typical of communities of Pakistani origin is starting to break down, that can only be a good thing. It is a sign that the younger generation in these communities are becoming less deferential and more independent in their thinking, and offers an opportunity for a much more healthy relationship between political parties and these communities.

    Although it can be argued that political engagement of political parties (not just Labour – this applies to other parties) via the paternalistic bradree system helped to maintain it, it’s difficult to see how it would have been easy to break out without potentially alienating those communities. It was perhaps always going to need someone from outside the established parties to challenge bradree.

    Whatever else we may think of GG, in doing this he has done us all a favour. And in this ‘respect’ at least, I would agree that there is common cause to be made.

  25. Would you support or oppose giving the security services the power to monitor people’s email and internet activity without the need to get a warrant?

    26% – Con
    15% – Lab
    22% – LD

    22% of LibDem voters support this! I find that astonishing after the hacking scandal & the allegations of police/ ex-security services people leaking private information to the media.
    8-)

  26. Crosbat11

    “… but the worst sound in politics is laughter. Ridicule precedes lost credibility ….”

    Obviously I rely on interpretation of polling or I wouldn’t be posting here, but corroboration is good to have. Pratfalls are a greater threat to the coalition than are the Labour party. One every three months for the next year is all it will take for them to lose the next election.

    If they manage that, Labour will lead the next government. There is no need for them to win if the coalition lose enough votes to “won’t vote” and minor parties.

    In Scotland there is anoher party which could win a majority of the Scottish seats notwihstanding that it’s key policy is rejected in the referendum.

    Nationalists must hope that the ineptitude of out of touch ministers and their ignorance of Scotland will deliver them the means to ridicule ot only the UK government, but the entire Westminster system.

    They may well be in luck.

    There is certain to be at least one pratfall that has salience in Scotland because of rurality. DC needs sensible informed advice. He needs to have Annabel Goldie or Murdo Fraser handcuffed to him all his waking hours.

  27. “Would you support or oppose giving the security services the power to monitor people’s email and internet activity without the need to get a warrant?”

    On Friday my daughter lost her mobile ‘phone.

    My son in law downloaded her contacts list, blocked the further use of the ‘phone and gave the police the address and image of the house where he traced it to.

    The police were quite impressed.

  28. Cruddas’ comments in the ST regarding Scotland simply say what we knew already: i.e. David Cameron wants the UK to stick together; Osborne doesn’t – or would be easily consoled by the assumed political advantage that he thinks his Party would gain from Scottish independence.

    Of course the SNP should try to get some political advantage from it. But I’m not sure that Scottish citizens care one way or t’other what Dave thinks about it. And I see this as being quite good for Labour, actually.

    There’s only one Party which really wants to keep the UK together & that’s Labour – so, if you are not for independence, vote for us.
    8-)

  29. Rob S,
    Not everybody involved in Respect is equal to that caricature and I’m pretty sure that calling Respect ‘Hezbollah-Hamas UK’ is exactly how Labour wants to treat the voters they’ve lost to them, to win them back.
    This sort of arrogance of ‘We don’t need the lefties, we don’t need the liberals, we don’t need the [trying to find a way to rephrase what you said that wouldn’t be offensive to politically alienated communities]’ is exactly the attitude that alienates voters from Labour, who should be their natural and core supporters.

    “The problem of engaging with Respect is that you might end up alienating the white voter if you are seen as kow towing to the Muslims”
    I’m just talking about finding common ground with a party that shares some values with Labour – the Environmentalism, Socialism and Trade-Union parts of Respect. Not that Labour should ‘chase the Muslim vote’ – just that it shouldn’t ignore where it does have common cause.
    If Labour want to be in the position, with an increasing plurality of political parties, where it cannot make friends, allies or ‘the enemy of my enemy’ allegiances, then it’ll find itself increasingly left out – just as is the case with nationalists and Europe.

    And you could rephrase your argument to be ‘might end up alienating the white voter if you are seen as kow towing to the blacks/the jews/the irish/[historical group here]’ – if Labour chases this pseudo-racist popularism of ‘THE OTHERS who’re out to destroy our way of life/jobs/etc’ then it’ll end up losing because The Conservatives/UKIP/BNP already have that voter in the bag and they’ll start to lose their ‘natural supporters’ (liberals, the left and urban voters) who’ll go elsewhere.
    I’d imagine that they’d also have to get rid of Ed M as a leader, given that his heritage is coming from ‘THE OTHERS’ since his dad was a Jewish Immigrant Marxist – I can’t imagine he’d want to take that sort of attitude.

    CrossBat,
    I’m just saying that I doubt Ed would be where he is today if he wasn’t his father’s son and thus didn’t have his father’s connections to the political left (and through those like Tony Benn, the Labour party) – I’m not saying that he hasn’t worked for his position, only that personal connections has made his getting in to that position a lot easier than otherwise.

  30. @ Sam
    ‘I’ve been thinking about a some sort Lab-Green co-operation for a little while. Assuming the boundary changes fail: if Labour let the Greens hold Brighton Pavilion in return for anti-coalition Green support in (say) Cambridge or either Norwich seat, both parties come out well electorally. ‘

    Labour has good hopes of winning all the seats you have mentioned next time.They certainly won’t need Green support to pick up Norwich South and have a good prospect of recapturing Brighton Pavilion. In 1992 Labour won Cambridge from 3rd place – and is well placed to do the same again.

  31. Amber

    Its possible that the Lib Dem vote is too small a sample size :P
    But I can’t say am 100% surprised, the remaining Lid Dem vote are surely majority Tories who like their local Lib Dem administration.

    Basically the Lib Dems as a national movement are well…pointless…what do they stand for now?

  32. @TingedFringe
    Very good post, IMHO.

  33. Sam, Graham
    Even if Labour are able to win all the seats that the Greens are going for (or the seat that they have), it’d be unwise in the long-run, given the historical decline of ‘the big three’ (especially the big two), to ignore potential allies.
    But if Labour want to remain in long-term political decline, they can decide that they ‘don’t need’ the voters they’ve lost, the groups they’ve alienated and keep chugging on with arrogant partisanship.

    Just as the Tories can do the same and hope UKIP doesn’t start to reach a FPTP tipping-point, like the SNP did in Scotland.

  34. @AmberStar
    “Would you support or oppose giving the security services the power to monitor people’s email and internet activity without the need to get a warrant?
    26% – Con
    15% – Lab
    22% – LD”

    22% of LibDem voters support this! I find that astonishing after the hacking scandal & the allegations of police/ ex-security services people leaking private information to the media.”

    Sadly, it’s no longer a surprise. A more positive way of looking at this is that 74% of Cons, 85% of Labs and 78% of LDs do not support the proposal.

    *

  35. I don’t think Labour will need to get ‘chummy’ with GG & Respect. I’ve heard & read in other places that GG’s team sold him in Bradford as the ‘Real Labour’ candidate & part of his campaign was: Vote for me, if you want a Labour government in 2015. The implication, allegedly, was that Hussein was a bradree candidate foisted on the Labour Party by an elite of vested interests & that GG was Labour’s ‘real’ candidate.

    That’s partly why the canvassing returns didn’t show that Labour were in trouble. The canvassers asked would people be voting Labour without including the candidate’s name. People who intended to vote for GG replied that they would be voting Labour because of the assertion that GG was the ‘real’ Labour candidate.

    It sounds weird, I know but I believe that’s what happened.
    8-)

  36. @ Anthony

    Oops, did I say something which you thought might get us sued? :-)

  37. @TingedFringe

    The SWP’s involvement with Respect would probably be a blockage on both sides. After the impact of Militant in the 80s Labour is rightly suspicious of entryism. For their part the SWP have a deep hatred of Labour… It is all a bit reminiscent of the Judean People’s Front, but that doesn’t make it less real.

  38. TF

    “Not everybody involved in Respect is equal to that caricature”

    The (main) problem with your fine words is that it is not a caricature.

    Have you actually listened to any Galloway speeches whilst on the stump- either this time or against Oona King? Have you ever read any Respect ‘literature’??

    I doubt it, otherwise you would not be proclaiming the need to stand alongside this odious alleged ‘party’.

    Mostr pertinent of all: Galloway IS ‘Respect’: without him they are absolutely nothing.

    So then: should Labour do a deal with George Galloway….??!! Now that DOES sound idiotic doesn’t it when phrased clearly that way.

    **
    n.b. The only far left party I would consider working with is the AWL: the only Trot party (left standing) that refuses to kow-tow to homicide bombers and anti semites abroad, and populist tosh about ‘a blameless community under siege’ here.

  39. @ Tinged, RAF

    I think that Labour are doing the best thing. We are going to look very hard at why GG suceeded in Blackburn ;-) & make sure that our future election strategy doesn’t facilitate a ‘Bradford West’ type contest.

    Labour already has some ‘pointers’ as to why canvassing didn’t show the collapse of the Labour vote & what some of the particular issues were. I’m not going to repeat them here because I wrote a comment already, which Anthony had to moderate. I thought I had been careful enough in my wording – but Anthony picked up on something which he was concerned about & modded it, for which I am grateful.
    8-)

  40. If labour associated themselves with Trots that would be a huge vote loser. Labour wont be that stupid.

  41. FWIW here is my take on the Bradford West result.
    The Conservatives as well as Labour have a problem in that they can not win a GE with their base support alone and have to reach out to the middle ground.
    Triangulation enabled Blair to win one GE easily, one comfortably and scrape a third due to FPTP, boundary advantages and a still weak opposition.
    Cameron’s task was harder due, rightly or wrongly, to a large ABT (anti-Thatcher) element in the Electorate but he managed to pull the cons up to be the largest party.
    To get the extra votes requires yet more triaingulation until such a point is reached where some core supporters go elsewhere or more likely (97 and 10) don’t bother at all.

    Scotland and to a lesser extent the Green Brighton seat, showed us that where a credible alternative exists many voters will take that option.
    Bradford West has unbdoubtedly specific factors exaggerating the effect but the fundamental issue for me is that in chasing middle ground votes Labour lost site of its’ core support pushing some of them elsewhere.
    I would suggest that this approach can only work for so long and that the length of time it can work is reducing in the modern age and that to blame specific politicians misses the point; although of course they can make a difference at the margins.

    Two related questions for me are; first will it be possible for Labour to get the balance between appealing to centrist voters without alienating too many core supporters and, secondly, if there appears to be a good chance of Labour winning does the amount of trimming tolerable to the core support increase.

    As above, the Conservatives have the same dilema and I wonder if we will see a working majority for a few GEs until a re-alignment tales place or we may get Electoral reform frist?

  42. the possessive of it is its

    it’s = it is

    there is NO SUCH CONSTRUCTION as

    its’

    just sayin’

  43. JimJam

    Labour should just draw a line under BW and move on: nothing I can see in it at all (with 3 days of reflection) that is of any use for future guidance.

    Now, conversely: IF Liam Byrne does cause a Hodge Hill by-election and IF Respect don’t put up a ‘celeb’- say for example the wonderfully simplistic logic rants of a black tee-shirted Mark Thomas (or is he already taken by SWP?)- i.e. they put up a local Muslim or a local ‘Worker’, and IF- having not put up a celeb but a local unknown- they win as they did in Bradford West ONLY THEN would what you post be of any relevance.

  44. Rob,
    I don’t mean this an insult as we both want to see the same thing (a Labour Government) but I do view you (along with Chris L) as the biggest admirer of TB and the strongest advocate of further triangulation/trimming amongst Labour supporters on this board so your opinion is of no surprise to me.

    Bradford West does not lead me to the position I outline above it merely confirms it, Scotland and 2010 stayaways is where I started from

    Would not a local candidate taking a large share even if Labour won a hyperthetical Hodge Hill by-election be enough for you to deign my post with relevance?

  45. This is priceless.

    A local prospective LD London Assembly member has just knocked on my door. I was unable to answer the door, but he posted a booklet.

    The thrust of the document is that people should vote for him because he is local and is the only challenger who can win. So far, so normal. But…

    It also says this:

    “it’s LD or Con here! On May 3rd it will be a close fight between local LD Sam Webber and the Conservatives. Labour can’t win here. More and more Labour voters are backing Sam Webeer to beat the Conservatives this time.”

    Eh? The LD’s in coalition with the Cons are courting Lab votes to oust the Tories? I have always voted LD in bromley, but to expect Labour voters to switch in the current climate is a bit rich.

  46. I think there was something of a one off “cleggmania” effect in Bradford West.
    In otherwords, Galloway got in under Labour’s radar, and (unlike Clegg) timed the razzmatazz of his campaign to perfection. Something not easy to replicate.

    Dispite all the mentions he gave to the party on the day after the by election – media outlets will be only too happy to give him the odd soundbite – Labour won’t be paying court to him (much as he would love that to happen).

    I think Cameron was right not to pay court to UKIP (much less the Eng Nats… defenders of St George etc) because that would have eaten too far into his support among the Indy/Guardian/OneNation type centrists. Whether he will be able to resist the pressure next time is another matter.

    The broad mass of the centre-right/centre/centre-left, mainstream unaligned, absolutely certain-to vote “responsible” members of society, so absolutely dwarfs the idiosyncratic might/might-not-vote for the fringe candidate types… I wonder why we are having this conversation.

    Moving debate about equality (green issues etc) on to the centre ground is the way ahead for thoughtful young intellectuals in the Labour party.

  47. That there has been damage to the Government is not worth denying.

    However, the lack of any shift to the 2 other parties show the ball is in the Conservatives’ court to regain people’s trust.

    Two things come out of this poll –

    The handling of the possible fuel strike has been inept and receives a thumbs down from all parties,
    and the Tories have completely failed to get across the good things in the budget – namely the raising of thresholds and the corporation tax, which will help business and be proved right.

  48. …”the lack of any shift to the 2 other parties…”

    Labour has gained about 3 points, no?

  49. The point of this Tory government, it seems, is that they don’t do anything constructive. They demolish what’s there & let business go fix everything. But business doesn’t exist to fix things. It exists to make money for its owners, executives & shareholders. Anything which does benefit society is simply a by-product.

    The UK faces significant challenges. The idea that these challenges can be faced & over-come simply as an accidental by-product of something else, that is very naive, is it not?

    So, the Government can’t do anything to regain support. They have to hope that others regain it for them, accidently, as a by-product of doing something else.
    8-)

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