The full tables for the Sunday Times poll are now up here – as already mentioned last night, the topline figures are CON 36%, LAB 39%, LDEM 8%, Others 16%. The “others” include UKIP at 7%, a figure they also hit once during the week for the Sun, so they certainly seemed to have recieved at least a temporary boost from the issue of Europe returning to the agenda.

Economic optimism remains extremely low. 9% of people expect their financial situation to get better over the next year compared to 57% who expect it to get worse, a net “feel good factor” of minus 48. While this is extremely negative historically, it is fairly typical of 2011 so far, and actually an improvement from the last few weeks when it has been below minus 50. Hardly anyone (3%) expects the present economic problems to be over within a year, 21% think they will pass in the next one or two years, 32% expect them to last three or four years, 24% expect them to last five to ten years.

The bulk of the poll is questions on Europe. Only 5% of people think that Britain has a lot of influence in the EU, 32% think Britain has a little influence, 41% not a lot and 15% none. 34% of people think that Britain has less influence than we did under Tony Blair and 45% think we have less influence than under Thatcher.

41% of respondents thought that Britain would be better off if we left the EU, 29% think we would be worse off and 30% neither or don’t know – a familar pattern of Euroscepticism. 41% of people think that David Cameron should use the current problems in the EU as an opportunity to renegotiate Britain’s relationship with Europe, 27% think Cameron should wait until the present crisis has passed to renegotiate, 15% think no renegotiation is needed. 59% of people think that Conservative rebels were right to vote for a referendum, compared to 22% who think they were wrong.

On the wider Eurozone crisis people are evenly split about whether the EU should be attempting to save the Eurozone – 36% think it is right to spend money on trying to save it, 39% think it is wrong. A majority, however, think that countries like Greece who are unable to pay their debts should be made to leave. Respondents do have considerable confidence in Angela Merkel to make the necessarily decisions to solve the crisis – 56% of people said they had a lot or a little confidence in her, compared to 36% who have confidence in Nicholas Sarkozy and just 8% for Silvio Berlusconi.

82% of people think it is important for Britain’s economy that the crisis in the Eurozone is solved. However, a good majority people remain opposed to Britain contributing money to any Eurozone bailout – only 24% think Britain should contribute, with 58% opposed.

Turning to the employment questions, 38% of people would back laws making it easier to sack unproductive workers. 19% think that workers’ rights are not protected enough and there should be greater protection from dismissal, 31% think the current balance is about right.

On maternity and paternity leave, 39% think current maternity provision is about right, 29% think it is too generous and 18% not generous enough. 31% think paternity provision is about right, 24% too generous and 31% not generous enough. Men are more likely than women to think that both maternity and paternity leave is too generous.

On staying at home to look after children, very similar proportions of men and women would stay at home to look after their children if their partner earned enough. 65% of men with children and 62% of women with children said they would stay at home to look after the children. However, attitudes are different when we asked about respondents’ spouses – 82% of men would be happy for their spouse or partner to stay at home and look after the children, however only 56% of women would be happy for their spouse/partner to stay at home.

On the Royal questions, 76% of people supporting giving female children equal rights to succeed to the throne with only 13% opposed. There was less support for ending the ban on a Catholic becoming monarch – 48% thought it should be allowed, 33% thought it should not.

Finally on the London protests, while people are sympathetic to the aims of the protestors, they would tend to support legal action to remove them from outside St Pauls. 39% say they support the aims of the protesters, 26% do not and 35% are unsure. 47%, however, would support legal action to remove them with 39% opposed. 53% of people think St Paul’s Cathedral was wrong to close its doors (31% think they were right), while 42% of people think that Giles Fraser was wrong to resign (31% think he was right).


240 Responses to “YouGov/Sunday Times: full report”

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  1. Lots of interesting stuff here.

    The one bit which caught my eye is this

    “38% of people would back laws making it easier to sack unproductive workers. 19% think that workers’ rights are not protected enough and there should be greater protection from dismissal, 31% think the current balance is about right.”

    So, a majority of people effectively think the current law is at least right.

  2. Disappointing for the LDs, although it is early days, and in the last 18 months of this Govt, there is likely to be a significant rise in support for both Tories and LDs as austerity and restraint is seen to put the UK economy in a strong position.

    The Tories have an ace up their sleeve in the UKIP is now on 7%. Should there be a promise of a referendum in the Tory manifesto either relating to a new treaty (in which case all parties will be bound to hold a referendum) or perhaps suggesting that now is the time for a general EU referendum, most of the UKIP vote would go Tory.

    I am surprised that 38% would support tougher laws associated with sacking; that is 2% greater than say they would vote Tory. There seems to be a start of a cultural change associated with austerity. I think this will help both Tories and LDs but will damage Labour.

  3. Joe
    ‘I normally vote Tory (well always have) but would consider the right Lib dem. This is because the tory high church type annoy me less than Simon Hughes, Tim Farron etc. But yes id probably vote for Danny Alexander were I in his constituancy.’

    Excellent news, Joe, you would make a valued addition to the LD posters on the site, which are few and far between.

  4. 8% had confidence in Silvio, where were they polled in a lap dancing club?

    On the 38% who would support sacking incompetent workers, will include quite a few incompetent workers, In my experience the more incompetent you are the less likely you are to admit it.

    The UKIP number is the most interesting, when they pass the Libdems in a poll, (can’t be long now) then the Libdems will start to realise that their Faustian pact with Cameron will condemn them to the SDP’s fate.

    When UKIP start seeing some return electorally from the present situation, then the Tories will panic, cut the LIbdems free and dash to the polls, in the hope of getting a majority before things get worse.

  5. @Anthony;

    When will UKIP be separated from others? Is 8% the magic number? The highest UKIP have had is 7%, and the lowest Lib Dems have had is 8%, so if UKIP reaches 8%, will YouGov separate them from others? I mean, it seems slightly unfair to consider UKIP an “other” when they’re polling equivalently to the Liberal Democrats.

  6. Tinged Fringe
    ‘I’ve noticed that the telegraph has started to use ‘squeezed middle’ now.’

    I do not think the Telegraph (and even more the Mail) have any other than antipathy for DC. This is because they see him as a Liberal Conservative, proven by the forming of the Coalition with the LDs. If there is one thing the DT dislikes more than Socialists it is Liberals.

  7. David
    ‘The UKIP number is the most interesting, when they pass the Libdems in a poll, (can’t be long now) then the Libdems will start to realise that their Faustian pact with Cameron will condemn them to the SDP’s fate.’

    It would seem to be a good idea to independently show any Party who polls over 5%. I am sure that history will show how much UK will owe the Coalition partners for putting Country before Party. Both are likely to be rewarded by a grateful electorate in 2015.

    ‘When UKIP start seeing some return electorally from the present situation, then the Tories will panic, cut the LIbdems free and dash to the polls, in the hope of getting a majority before things get worse.’

    The Tories will dash to the polls as promised in 2015. If you believe differently then I suggest you visit a betting site as you will get tremendous odds. I would be surprised if the Tories do not pick up most of the UKIP support in 2015, which will be a pity as it will mean the end of the Coalition, which is serving this country so well.

  8. I always look at the relative proportions of Con and Lab voters in 2010 in the weighted sample, simply because YouGov control for identification and not actual voting, even though actual voting in 2010 is still a better prediction of current support than anything else in the published tables.

    On the old YouGov methodology, it was quite common to find a low % of 2010 Conservatives in the sample, so more often than not the poll findings seemed to me to be quite generous to Labour.

    Since the methodology change a couple of weeks ago, that pattern has disappeared, and we’re much more likely to get something close to 25% more 2010 Cons than Lab in the sample, which is in line with the actual voting and all well and good.

    In this poll, though, there are 30% more 2010 Cons than Lab, more than you would expected, which is an added reason to suspect that the m.o.e effects are understating the underlying Labour lead by a % point or two.

  9. @TopHat
    Had the positions of UKIP and the LDs been reversed in last night’s poll, presumably AW’s write up would have been as follows:
    “Tonight’s YouGov poll for the Sunday Times has topline figures of CON 36%, LAB 39%, UKIP8% and others on 16%….. As usual I will do a full write up tomorrow when the tables are published.”

  10. Anthony, how long before you have to remove he Lib-Dems from your polling average table and replace them with UKIP? :D

  11. David

    In my experience the more incompetent you are the more likely you are to get promoted

  12. Gin

    Not long!!! But AW may decide to keep the dems because they still have mps. At least until 2015 if Henry is correct

  13. More Labour supporters have confidence in Berlusconi than do Conservatives! Shame on us!

  14. @Henry

    “I would be surprised if the Tories do not pick up most of the UKIP support in 2015..”

    I don’t understand how you could possibly think this. Even under unusual circumstances, eg. the Tories offering an in/out referendum, I don’t believe the UKIP vote would go anywhere but up from last year. I’m sure there’d be people who cave like in 2010 but I personally wouldn’t vote Tory if you put a gun to my head. Votig UKIP is not just about the EU for many people.

  15. @ Oldnat.
    “The Isle of Man doesn’t seem to have sunk into chaos through giving the vote to 16 and 17 year olds.” Etc, etc..

    (1) No-one has claimed giving votes to 16 year olds would lead to chaos, so this is just rhetoric.
    (2) You mis-specify the debate by refusing to put it into context. 18 year olds have full rights including voting; 16 year old olds have numerous rights withheld from them. Unless you are arguing that the latter should be full citizens with full rights — & presumably you are not — then it will always be a matter of opinion what “adult” rights they are granted. There can logically be no automatic assumption that they get the vote & hence the debate about the appropriate age is irresolvable. All this stuff about “this was once said about 21 year olds” is irrelevant. Allowing 18 year olds to vote was associated with their coming to full citizenship; your proposal to allow 16 year olds to vote is not.

  16. @Robbie Alive
    I’m with OldNat on the principle. Governments are supposed to govern in the interests of all of their citizens. If 16 year olds had the vote, what might have become of the decisions to withdraw Educational Maintenance Allowance and to whack up tuition fees? As it stands, any party pledging to reverse those policies in 2015 will have to do so in the knowledge that few if any voting in that election would benefit personally from the change.

    But ideally, I’d like to see parents given the right to cast an extra vote for each of their children below voting age, whatever that is set at. Men for sons, women for daughters. I trust parents to care for the interests of their children a lot more than I do governments.

  17. @Robbiealive- You are absolutely right. The only thing I have to add is the specific case relating to that old phrase ‘no taxation without representation,’ which can be rearranged to ‘no representation without taxation’. The over 16 year olds would have to be taxed to make things fair (unless, of course, they were below the income tax brackets, which means they would have to have as much chance to work as those who are18-65, which would mean rejigging society completely). I suspect that most 16-17 year olds would not approve of being taxed as the price for voting.

  18. Stanley

    What makes you think that over 16s aren’t taxed, if their income is sufficiently high?

  19. RinN

    ‘Not long!!! But AW may decide to keep the dems because they still have mps. At least until 2015 if Henry is correct.’

    A good point about MPs.

    I think my comments may have been unclear. I believe that the Tories will benefit from picking up UKIP votes, and therefore win enough seats for overal control.

    However, I am confident that the LDs will return a healthy number of MPs. However, if the Tories have an overal majority they will not need to form a Coalition with the LDs. This IMO will be a loss to the country as it has benefitted from the current arrangements.

  20. Good Morning from a wet Bournemouth, but I still did my 5k run, before Mass, in latin. Not bad at age 56, I think.

    Two questions:
    Why are Lib Dems at 8% in the latest poll, is this not clearly an outlier?- too high a % it must be for tthem, i think.

    Most people do not support the ending of the Religious Test for the Succession to the Throne. Do more educated people than me know the reasons?
    (33% oppose, 44% support, 13% are agnostic on the question)

    I think Prince Charles dated european aristocratic catholic ladies, but he was warned off..

  21. “I believe that the Tories will benefit from picking up UKIP votes, and therefore win enough seats for overal control.”

    This is the big unknown. UKIP’s argument is that the Conservatives’ hardened stance on Europe is insufficient and anything short of a referendum on outright secession is a sell-out. They also imply (but stop short of saying it outright) that the Conservatives are just as bad as the other two parties.

    Under FPTP, the only bargaining chip small parties have is to punish the party they ideologically closest to by taking enough votes to cause them to lose to the mainstream opponent. I know I’ve speculated that “Vote Labour, get Tory” might work for the Lib Dems, but I’m not so sure that “Vote UKIP, get Labour” will work quite so well for the Conservatives. A lot of UKIP supporters may consider that a price worth paying.

    Ho hum, the Tory Right really haven’t thought this one through. If they’d quietly dropped their opposition to AV, they would probably have got a huge transfer from UKIP pushing things in their favour (not to mention a very strong argument of what the people whose votes transferred to them want). If UKIP splits the vote enough to give the election away to Labour, the Conservatives will have no-one to blame but themselves.

  22. @Oldnat
    True, but the unemployment rate among 16-17s is I am sure a lot higher than in other areas of society, principally because many are at school.

    But the point of my argument is that 16 year olds are generally speaking not mature/educated/old enough to vote. I quote from Robbiealive ’18 year olds have full rights including voting; 16 year old olds have numerous rights withheld from them. Unless you are arguing that the latter should be full citizens with full rights — & presumably you are not — then it will always be a matter of opinion what “adult” rights they are granted.’

    There is future potential for them to become more mature/educated and then perhaps they could vote. If the mess that is the state education system was sorted out, and Britain actually made sure that children can read, write and add before they leave school. Good luck Gove and your colleagues in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

  23. 2011 Q1 Trade cuurent account trade deficit of £9.4bn is revised down to £4.1bn
    Q2 is revised down to £2bn- 0.5% of GDP
    A current account surplus might not be too far away-The Sunday Times notes some interesting numbers from ONS’s periodic revision phases :-

    despite struggling exports.

    On household incomes, this year was supposed to be the second in a row real household disposable incomes had fallen. The revised figures show that rather than falling by 0.8% last year , real incomes increased by 0.1%

    The previous picture of the lack of savings ( as well as lack of spending) by households is now corrected by ONS.
    THe savings ration for 2009 is revised up to 7.8 ( 6%); and for 2010 to 7.5% ( 5.3%)

    The implication might be more potential for a recovery in consumer spending than previously thought.

  24. My mouse seems to be mixing stuff up when I “copy” prior to putting Captcha code in .!

  25. @ DAVID

    ‘8% had confidence in Silvio, where were they polled in a lap dancing club?’

    ‘9% of people expect their financial situation to get better over the next year’

    It must of been full of directors.

  26. Suspect in practice UKIP voters are quite happy to vote Labour – Harwich being the obvious example. Labour has tended to get a lot of traction from suggesting that many Tory anti-Europeans are Fascists.

  27. I do not make the following point to be partisan, merely to follow up a previous discussion. Some left wing posters, periodically make the claim that the public are more in tune with centre left views and policies, than Tory views and policies. Because this poll covers a number of cogent area’s that would prove or disprove that point, I find (as usual), that the left wing claims don’t stack up.
    The opinions which come out of this poll, if they are to be believed, are showing a centre right attitude in most area’s. I fully realise that this is not a guarantee of Tory success, but Tory attitudes are clearly not restricted to retired Major’s and city wide boys.

    Further, I hope the curtain measurements taken at number 10 during the week, will not be wasted, now we see the 7 % lead was probably an outlier.

  28. CHRISLANE1945

    ” I still did my 5k run, before Mass, in latin.”

    Well, if you did the run in Latin, you might at least have told us that you ran 3378 pedes!

    (Congratulations btw)

  29. Leader Ratings:
    Cameron down 4 , (got of very lightly i’d say)
    Miliband plus 2 , (the lads ripping away)
    Clegg down 1 ( no comment)

    Upshot, Cameron still well in front.

  30. @chris lane 1945
    I assumed from the 1945 after your name, that you were 66. However, a word of warning, in fact two. I was still running 30 plus miles a week 9 years ago, but my knees were by then reaching the point of no return, so be careful.
    Secondly, by disclosing your age, you leave yourself open to “old git” comments from those with nothing better to say.
    For years, (since I stopped running 8 years ago) I had a “Nordic Cross Trainer”. I did 90 minuet sessions 3 times a week. Excellent for heart and lungs, but still gave the knees some stick. Now, I have a water rower.
    I row 13.5 Km 3 x per week (bloody hard work). It amounts to rowing 8 miles per session. No knee issues at all. Regarding your devotions, I am unable to compete at all.

  31. Very interesting stuff for UKIP. Random variation may well soon see them poll above the Lib Dems. That’d be a fun day to be a fly on the wall of Lib Dem HQ

  32. Interesting that a majority are content with labour laws as they are – so why the clamour to ‘repatriate’ these powers from the EU?
    Also note that a clear majority do not want to leave the EU (if I read that correct) – so yet again the Tories are arguing amongst themselves about Europe for no purpose

  33. Eric Goodyear,

    Are you saying that the government should not undertake a policy if a poll reveals that a majority of people disagree?

  34. @ERIC GOODYER

    41% of respondents thought that Britain would be better off if we left the EU, 29% think we would be worse off and 30% neither or don’t know – a familar pattern of Euroscepticism. 41% of people think that David Cameron should use the current problems in the EU as an opportunity to renegotiate Britain’s relationship with Europe, 27% think Cameron should wait until the present crisis has passed to renegotiate, 15% think no renegotiation is needed. 59% of people think that Conservative rebels were right to vote for a referendum, compared to 22% who think they were wrong.

    I cannot see that your reading of AW’s above summing up, actually fits with the facts. Every poll we ever see on this matter, shows public opinion is much nearer Tory/ UKIP policy than either Labour or Liberal. The idea that people who believe we should come out altogether and have the hump with Cameron at the present time, are hardly going to turn to Labour – unless they are retarded. In your terms, that would be like saying, ” I don’t think Labour in power spent enough on social services. Therefore I am going to vote Conservative. Not likely is it.

  35. What’s with the comments about UKIP making electoral inroads? Their vote is fairly uniformly spread across the country (well, across England at least), with very little local variation. They’ve shown no ability to do the kind of targetting that actually wins small parties seats at Westminster or local council level. If they get around 7% at a general election, the most likely result the party will get is that they get all their deposits back and no MPs elected.

  36. @GREEN CHRISTIAN
    I agree entirely, however whilst it is probably good news to you, it is not to me. Such a result could land us with a LIB LAB PACT. Then the idiots who voted UKIP, because Cameron broke his promise and is “soft on Europe”, could sit back and enjoy total assimilation.

  37. chouenlai, are people who vote UKIP necessarily “idiots” then?

    On an earlier point I can see people who think the Tories should pull out of Eurpoe voting Labour because it might not be be too high a priority. So they wouldn’t necessarily be “retarded” either.

  38. @CHOUENLAI

    Really, it’s just more evidence that we need some form of PR (my preferred system would be AV+, or some other variation on AMS). Whilst my partisan hack side is pleased that my party got our first MP last year, whilst UKIP didn’t, it does worry me that UKIP can get just shy of a million votes and not get Parliamentary representation.

  39. There is a tendency for many people to exaggerate how many UKIP voters were formerly Tory supporters – I recall a study suggesting the actual figure is below 50% with many UKIP supporters having been non-voters.It is also worth recalling that many Labour voters have traditionally been anti -Common Market and would not find it difficult to switch to UKIP – at least in mid term..Labour was ,of course, the last major party to go into a general election – in 1983 – committed to EC withdrawal – much good did it do them!
    I attended the Norwich North by-election count in July 2009 when UKIP polled 11% of the vote, and from my own observation and the general comments of scrutineers it was very clear that their support came disproportionately from the normally strong Labour areas .Support was much weaker in the Tory wards.

  40. Colin
    2011 Q1 Trade cuurent account trade deficit of £9.4bn is revised down to £4.1bn
    Q2 is revised down to £2bn- 0.5% of GDP

    I am really surprised. I was thinking a minimum of 3 years of Coalition Govt before the current account would show noticeable improvement.

  41. Henry,
    It is quite normal for the current account of the Balance of Payments to improve at a time of economic weakness – indeed it would be very worrying if it failed to do so!.Any significant economic growth will lead to imports being sucked in and the figures will deteriorate once again.

  42. ‘If UKIP splits the vote enough to give the election away to Labour, the Conservatives will have no-one to blame but themselves.’

    But it won’t. The likes of Peter Liiley voted against referendum now because the timing was not right. The Tories will either take action on Europe, call a referendum related to a treaty change or promise a referendum in their manifesto in 2015.

    I will be very surprised if the Tories do not take the 2015 election easily. I am hoping the the strong economic postion in 2014+ will also help the LDs while undermining Labour.

  43. I see the UK is going down the line of privatising defence (of merchant ships) – presumably to keep the Marines available to attack other countries.

    Wouldn’t it be more sensible to offer the services of a Marine or two (armed with a large gun or two) to protect ships in piratical waters?

    The owners could even be charged for their services (as happened in the past), and make a bob or two for the Treasury in the process.

  44. Graham
    ‘It is quite normal for the current account of the Balance of Payments to improve at a time of economic weakness – indeed it would be very worrying if it failed to do so!.Any significant economic growth will lead to imports being sucked in and the figures will deteriorate once again.’

    I would agree if the growth relates to growth in GDP based on internal spending and consumption. What is happening is that we are getting closer to balancing our books (although not yet achieved). It is the job of the Coalition Govt to encourage growth in production particularly related to exports. This is why tax cuts when introduced need to concentrate on employer’s NI, Corporation Tax, and rasising the allowance for basic tax payers, rather the reducing VAT, which will do nothing for business but encourage consumption.

  45. Graham

    I think most of us on this site would agree with you that UKIP pick up support from Labour as well as Tory, and i remember some polls indicating that is the case.

    However, while Tories are likely to win back support from this quarter, including some ex Labour voters if they offer a referendum, Labour will not offer anything and therefore will not win back support from UKIP.

    LDs have lost most of their support to Labour, because many people still believe austerity is wrong to address ther present economic crisis. When the Coalition is proved to be right, LDs are well placed to regain lost ground.

  46. HENRY
    `I will be very surprised if the Tories do not take the 2015 election easily. I am hoping the the strong economic postion in 2014+ will also help the LDs while undermining Labour.`
    I feel LD will improve once they get rid of Nick Clegg…But they need to give the new leader atleast a year and half,otherwise they will look opportunistic…However,am not so sure of the Tory victory being easy…The Independent paper with it`s headline editorial has just turned anti-Cameron,joining the two other leftie papers…They can see that the next election can go either way with Milliband`s improved performance…Other posters have commented about the papers using his terminology including squeezed middle and fast-buck Britain…The Tory MP`s can see that too which is why the scale of the revolt was so high…Atleast half of Cameron`s backbenchers did not vote with the government…If they felt strongly that Cameron would carry them through the next election,they would have backed him

  47. Henry,
    There is little evidence to support what you suggest.Deflationary policies benefit the current account whilst expansionary policies normally have the opposite effect..’Balancing the books’ is neither here nor there except in so far as it has a deflationary effect on demand.The European economies are certainly not going to be growing sufficiently fast to generate an export boom for the UK any time soon.As for a ‘strong economic position in 2014’, I suspect you will be disappointed. It will require much more than faith and hope to bring about that.

  48. “But it won’t. The likes of Peter Liiley voted against referendum now because the timing was not right. The Tories will either take action on Europe, call a referendum related to a treaty change or promise a referendum in their manifesto in 2015. ”

    Hey, don’t get me wrong, I’m with the Tory leadership on this one. An in-or-out referendum now would be economic suicide, but there’s going to be plenty of chances to renegotiate terms later (especially if the rest of Europe’s getting as restless as I think it’s getting).

    Unfortunately, this isn’t enough for a large part of the public now. With the Lisbon Treaty and the Eurozone crisis the public mood is now absolutely toxic, and I fear that no amount of reasoning from the Conservative front benches, however persuasive, will shift this. Even a promise of a referendum after the 2015 election may not be enough – people may simply decide the Conservatives broke their promise last time and can’t be trusted this time.

    It would be staggeringly unfair if the Conservatives to lose to a pro-EU coalition due to a shift in public opinion AGAINST the EU, but, hey, they decided this sort of thing is fair, so they’ll have no grounds to complain.

  49. This poll shows again the unremitting negativity towards Europe by the English (I suspect the other home nations are not so negative) and it does get tiresome. If the current EZ crisis forces those to get their asses in gear and fix their shortcomings, the EZ could become a very powerful economic bloc within a decade (and it could happen, the 1997 crisis cleaned up the Far Eastern economies and saved them from much of the foolishness that precipitated the current one). If that were to happen, I suspect UK’s role and influence may be much diminished given their unhelpfulness in the EZ’s hour of need. The party the English public will blame for that outcome, if that should come to pass, remains to be seen but the public will certainly not hold themselves responsible for any of it :-)

  50. DH

    “This poll shows again the unremitting negativity towards Europe by the English (I suspect the other home nations are not so negative)”.

    Northern Ireland is seldom polled. Wales is buried in “the Midlands” so we don’t really know about them.

    The Scots polled in GB polls don’t show much of a difference in attitudes to the EU than in England. However, the underlying positions may be variant.

    There is a strong strand among SNP supporters that has never forgiven the UK/Heath for seeing fishing as being “expendable” in the Common Market negotiations. The EFTA/EEA model is seen by many as being better for Scotland’s interests.

    Whether those in England who wish to leave the EU are EFTA orientated, or simply want to have nothing to do with “foreigners”, I have no idea.

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