Full tables for the YouGov/Sunday Times poll are now up here. This week’s topline figures are CON 36%, LAB 42%, LDEM 10% – so there is no obvious sign of a conference boost for Labour. Ed Miliband’s own ratings are almost unchanged from last week. His net approval stands at minus 32, from minus 33 a week ago.

More positively Miliband was seen as the leader most able to understand the problems faced by ordinary people (or at least, the leader least unable to understand them). 35% thought Miliband was able to understand ordinary people’s problems, compared to 30% for Clegg, 29% for Cameron and 22% for George Osborne.

David Cameron’s approval rating is also steady at minus 8, unchanged from a week ago. Wider perceptions of his premiership so far are pretty average – 37% think he has been an average Prime Minister, 21% a good or great Prime Minister, 39% a poor or terrible Prime Minister. 40% of people think it was the right decision for the Conservatives to go into coalition with the Liberal Democrats, 42% think it was the wrong decision. When we asked the same question for the Liberal Democrats a fortnight ago, 36% had thought it was right for them to go into coalition with the Tories, 45% thought it was the wrong decision.

The public remain divided on the economic strategy, 36% saying the government should continue to prioritise the deficit, 38% that they should prioritise growth. However, there were majorities in favour of all the suggested growth policies asked about (extra capital spending, VAT cuts and increasing personal tax allowances). There is little support for Britain helping in any further bailout in the Eurozone. 63% agree that Britain has its own problems and should not contribute any money to help the debt crisis, 22% think it is in Britain’s interests to contribute money to help solve the crisis.

Finally there were some questions on Tony Blair. Blair is regarded as the best Labour party leader by 24% of respondents, followed by John Smith on 16% and Harold Wilson on 11% (Clement Attlee receives only 6% – suggesting a not unsurprising bias towards more recent leaders). 39% of people think Blair was a good or great Prime Minister, 24% an average one, 35% a poor or terrible one. Despite the broadly positive perception of him, 47% think that Miliband should distance his party from Blair, with 27% disagreeing (though they also think Labour party members were wrong to boo his name).


426 Responses to “More from YouGov/Sunday Times”

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  1. Deeply disappointed by the lack of Attlee.

  2. “47% think that Miliband should distance his party from Blair, with 27% disagreeing”

    Though it is really Conservatives who are most agreeable about Miliband distancing Labour from Blair and his legacy:

    Agree/disagree
    Con 51%/24%, Lab 41%/37%, LD 44%/35%

    Elinor Roosevelt once said: “Great minds discuss ideas, mediocre minds discuss events, small minds discuss personalities.”

    Truth is we are “small minded” in the main, personality is important and events cannot be ignored. It is not so much a case of “Blair worship” as that he has become the personal focus of a righteous hatred for some.

    A ny PM of either Tory or Labour stripe during 2001- 2009, would have found it extremely problematical to streer a same world course compatible with the frenzied NeoCon US administration.

  3. A very bitter week-end for European center-right. On Saturday,Jean-Pierre Bel became the first socialist ever to be elected President of the French Senate, exceeding by 2 votes the total of 177 seats of the new majority (Socialists, Communists, Greens and Left Radicals). The center-right presented two candidacies, a sing of its divisions, who obtained between them 163 votes, 8 less than their sum of seats (5 blank votes, 1 absent, 2 cross-overs). Meanwhile former PS secretary F. Hollande leads very comfortably the polls both for the open center-left primary of October and for the PE of next year.
    In Italy, the center-left alliance has for the first time a double-digit lead over Berlusconi’s alliance: 47 to 34.5(I remind that an alliance has just to be first even by 1 vote to get OM). The Democratic Party is the first Italian party, ahead of Berlusconi’s PDL (28 to 24,5) and the new star of Italian politics, the SEL (Left, Ecology and Freedom) is at 8% and very close to snatch the 3d place from the Northern League (8.5).
    In Germany, all VI polls show now the Liberals at 2-4% and out of the next Bundestag, irrevocably dooming the incumbent center-right gvt. of Frau Merkel. Their recent U-turn to euro-skepticism was apparently the kiss of death: they cannot convince euro-skeptics of their sincerity and they lose (mainly to the Greens, but also to the Social Democrats and to the Pirate Party) what had been left of their pro-European electorate.

  4. I agree with Top Hat about Attlee. It is worrying how little history people living in England know.

    Who, apart from committed political activists, took much interest in the Labour Conference, or come to that the LibDem one? If people don’t notice party conferences, these events are hardly likely to change voting intentions significantly.

    Ed Miliband’s approval rating is so low that his Conference performance, which in my opinion was inadequate, can’t make it much worse.

  5. You can’t help loving Attlee, Denis Healey quotes Wilfred Fienburgh:

    “… a conversation with an ordinary man was like a game of tennis; a conversation with Attlee was like throwing biscuits to a dog – all you could get out of him was yup, yup, yup.”

    The demands of a modern media would not be able to tolerate him.

  6. Unfortunately, it is arguable that the modern media would not be able to tolerate any great leader. Churchill had a bad enough time in the 1930s as it was, and Lloyd George wouldn’t have lasted a week, behaving as he did, with today’s press, television and internet.

    On the other hand, some inadequate leaders might have been shown the door by today’s media. Asquith’s semi-detached behaviour, specifically in that he is believed to have been writing letters to his mistress during the Cabinet meetings that ruined Britain in three days by deciding to go to war against Germany in 1914, was disastrous. If Asquith had been strong enough to resist the small minority of ministers who made Beglium a cause for war, Britain might not be the debt ridden place that it is today. Asquith was a decent man, but he developed fatal flaws that a tough media might have prevented.

  7. Camerons speech may well be a real challenge to Ed Milliband.

    Given that a main theme for him was the squeezed middle and an end to something for nothing at the top and the bottom how will he react to expanded Right to Buy?

    On one level it will be popular with the very people he needs and wants to win over, while many on the Labour left hate it and the prospect of 80% market rents for new council houses will go down like a lead ballon in many Labour constituencies.

    From a Scottish perspective what does a new Scottish Labour leader do if Ed backs it, go along with national policy and be seen as a poodle, or use it to show his independence and go another way by adopting the same policy as the SNP.

    That might improve his standing but it would hardly put clear water between them and Alex Salmond.

    Peter.

  8. Ah Atlee!
    Had the advantage that his govn was full of tough-minded, if disputatious, intellectuals & operators who had just spent 5 years in Government — Morrison, Dalton, Bevin, Cripps + Healy, Wilson, Gaitskill, Bevan, etc. [I know I’m getting old but what non-entities the modern lot seem.] Trouble was by 1951 they were worn out!
    And how wonderful to have a politics free of modern-day security mania. It is said that Atlee was driven to Pol meetings in ’45 by his wife: he sat in the back doing the crossword.

  9. @ Robbie Alive

    [I know I’m getting old but what non-entities the modern lot seem.]

    Absolutely! 8-)

    Sorry, I forgot you dont like yellow blobs!!

  10. ‘FREDERIC STANSFIELD
    I agree with Top Hat about Attlee. It is worrying how little history people living in England know.’

    Why? People live in the modern world and watch modern news. It’s true in all countries. The longer in the past something or someone is the less relevance to modern life .

  11. @ Valerie
    “Absolutely! Sorry, I forgot you dont like yellow blobs!!”

    Yellow blobs are bad nuf but the current posts about sport are worse! While a civilized person like me can take a modest interest in fashionable football, Rugby is beyond the pale. At my Social Mobility Academy [formerly known as Grammar Schools] I was forced to play the silliest of games: muddy, violent, pointless.
    The fact that England players are now being disciplined for lewd harassment of some poor hotel worker says all you need to know about it.

  12. Billy Bob – I think I recall Anthony Howard writing once that he had had a conversation with every British Prime Minister since the war. His conversation with Attlee, however, was along the lines of.

    12 year-old Anthony Howard: “Can I have your autograph please sir”
    Clement Attlee: “No, bugger off”

  13. I await to see if May’s commitment to ‘Abolishing’ the Human Rights Act will be repeated formally at the party conference, or if she’s become yet another loose cannon within cabinet. Neither really look good for the stability of the coalition.

  14. @ PETER CAIRNS

    “expanded Right to Buy?”

    I missed this announcement & Googled it after reading your post.

    It came up just ahead of a report that Raul Castro has announced that Cubans will have the right to buy & sell cars.

    An official government decree published on Wednesday said Cubans and foreign residents would now be able to do with their cars what they wanted “without any prior authorization from any entity.”

    I wonder whether Raul influenced David Cameron-or vice versa ?

    :-)

  15. @ AW

    ” Ed Miliband’s own ratings are almost unchanged from last week. His net approval stands at minus 32, from minus 33 a week ago.”

    pb has a piece which says EM’s ratings have moved from :-
    -17 (+33-50) on 28th September

    to

    -32 ( +28-60 ) in this ST Poll.

  16. Attlee’s support comes partly from the over-60s (but then you’d need to be over 75 to have a chance of remembering his government) but most strongly from TopHat’s generation, the under-24s. Still 6% isn’t bad after all these years.

    I was suprised by the strong showing for John Smith – 16% as opposed to 3% each for Brown and Kinnock. Obviously the only good Celt is a dead one. :( Sorry, prolonged exposure to Manx politics makes me even bitchier than usual. It’s also notable that support for Smith over Brown is even stronger in Scotland.

    Although the feeling that Miliband should distance himself from Blair’s legacy is strongest among Conservatives, it’s true among all Party supporters. There’s also a suggestion that the feeling is stronger among those who voted Tory or Lib Dem in 2010 but who aren’t now.

  17. In his conference speech Labour leader Ed Miliband described Britain as dominated by “fast-buck capitalists” and “predators, not producers”. Do you agree or disagree with this description?

    This was an interesting question & the response was interesting too.
    55% agreed, including 28% of Tories & 54% of Dems.
    26% disagree & 19% (including 17% of Tories) are not sure.

    So one the big messages of Ed’s speech, despite the monstering it got in the media, has struck a chord with the majority of voters. I’d say that’s good news for Labour.
    8-)

  18. @ A Wells
    “12 year-old Anthony Howard: “Can I have your autograph please sir”
    Clement Attlee: “No, bugger off””
    Howard was lucky! In one of his autobiographies BBC Simpson reports that when, as a cub reporter, he had the temerity to ask Wilson in public for his opinion on policy, Wilson replied by punching him v. hard in the stomach.

  19. @Colin

    Personal popularity polling tells us that people are not enthusiastic about EM.

    Voter intent polling tells us that if there is an election soon, EM would be PM.

    Combined they show us that if there was an election soon, EM would be PM and no one would be enthusiastic about it.

  20. @ Colin
    “It came up just ahead of a report that Raul Castro has announced that Cubans will have the right to buy & sell cars.”
    I hold no brief for Cuban government. But when I was there a few years ago I noticed that the kids [limited in number by effective family planning] were cherished & well-behaved & universally educated & literate. In the Oriente, where there was v. little transport of any kind, we hired a car: the back seat was always occupied by goggled-eyed schoolkid hitchhikers in their bright Orange sashes, some as young as 6/7. In Britain I would never dare pick up a footsore child, while in Cuba it would have seemed callous not to do so.

  21. @ Colin

    I saw the poll which had a bounce for Ed M to -17. It’s in YG’s archive. There was no VI question. The leader question was only asked about Ed M, not the other Party leaders so I discounted it as being out of its usual context. It seems I was right to do that, because it’s back to usual for today’s poll.
    8-)

  22. COLIN
    It looks like he got a ‘Look he’s on TV’ boost that then fell back to his ‘normal’ dreadful approval rating when he no longer was.
    I expect it to fall further by the end of the Tory conference unless there’s a major blunder (which it’s unlikely there will be).

    The new housing policy should be a big vote winner – one that, unlike the HRA, speed limits, etc announcements, has substance.
    Selling council houses, to pay for the building of more is a great way to create jobs, create growth and secure housing for more people (especially on low incomes).

    If Labour oppose the plans (for partisan reasons), they’re really shooting themselves in both feet.

  23. @ Peter Cairns

    From a Scottish perspective what does a new Scottish Labour leader do if Ed backs it, go along with national policy and be seen as a poodle…
    ————————————
    What if the expanded right to buy proves popular with Scottish voters & the SNP decide to go along with it? Would that make the SNP wee Tory poodles?
    8-)

  24. @JayBlanc,

    “Combined they show us that if there was an election soon, EM would be PM and no one would be enthusiastic about it.”

    I don’t agree with that at all.

    If we had an election campaign as of tomorrow, the polling ratings would probably alter and leadership ratings would become a lot more important. Ed would have to demonstrate to the British public that he was capable of becoming PM – something he hasn’t done so far. It’s worth remembering that it is during election campaigns that leadership qualities become extremely important., especially during a time of global economic and social instability.

    Also worth mentioning that the Labour and Tory vote is currently very soft. This has been demonstrated so many times over the past year. There is certainly nothing to suggest that the lead wouldn’t narrow right down again -or even reverse in favour of the Tories.

    I’m certainly not saying that Ed wouldn’t win if a GE were called today, just that you can’t assume he definitely would on the basis of current Yougov polling.

  25. The problem for Labour at the mo is that any gains made from a disproportionate swing in the marginal seats would currently be undone by their current demise in Scotland. Therefore, using current polling and assuming the new boundaries go ahead, I still think we’d be looking at a hung parliament situation, but with Labour as the largest party.

    Personally, I think this is still the likeliest scenario in 2015. I can foresee the coalition parties both being very unpopular as the UK economy goes back into recession, but I just don’t have faith in Ed as a leader at all. I think he’s very poor. Therefore, I’d be surprised if Labour gets a majority, but I think they probably will get the most seats.

  26. @ Tingedfringe

    Labour shouldn’t do anything about this announcement, only asking for the details. It’s unlikely that there is any judging from the interview. So there will be plenty of holes (the 400 th. jobs is certainly taken from the air).

    Then they should let others to create a narrative that it is to lock people in unsustainable debt and tax and give a free hand to Tories’ donors from the real estate sector.

    It will not be a vote winner.

  27. David Cameron has apologised to any woman he may have offended by remarks he made to two female MPs as he acknowledged that the Conservatives need to do more to attract women voters.
    —————————————
    FYI – The PM has, at long last, decided to apologise. To all who said I was over-reacting to Cameron’s anti-women jibes at PMQs, I blow a big rasperry :razz:

  28. Expanded right-to-buy is another headline-grabbing policy that will be dead in the water when it starts to be examined.

    Most council tenants already have right to buy, so an expansion can only mean increased discounts. And most of those who don’t buy now are generally those who can’t get/afford a mortgage (pensioners, the unemployed or disabled, low paid), and none of these are going to be able to buy irrespective of the discount…

    …unless the discounts are so huge that the money that comes in is nowhere near enough to build a rewplacement house. So how will the housing stock be replenished as claimed by Cameron?

    And as for “firing up the engines of the British economy”, I presume he’s talking about a consumer debt-fuelled artificial boom that will come crashing down as soon as interest rates go up.

  29. “The problem for Labour at the mo is that any gains made from a disproportionate swing in the marginal seats would currently be undone by their current demise in Scotland. ”
    So 2015 could be a major problem for the union after all – whichever way the SNP would go in a hung parliament.

  30. I don’t see Labour losing seats in Scotland at the next Westminster election – indded gains from the LibDems and the single Tory are more likely.. We were told in the wake of the SNP 2007 election win and their Glasgow by election gain that Labour faced big losses at the 2010 election . It didn’t happen – nor – in my opinion – will it next time.

  31. @amberstar – go to it Amber – miles ahead of the game.

    I had a post put into moderation last night for reasons I can’t quite fathom out.

    What I had hoped to comment on was Andrew Tyries comments on the coalition growth strategy.

    It seems clear from this that those criticising the government on this score are not just Labour supporters and the left. While the policy options vary according to political preference, there appears to be widespread agreement, including within the Tory party, that the government isn’t establishing a clear growth strategy. This matters hugely, as the lack of growth is the only reason why we are back in a financial crisis now. The idea that dealing with the deficit will somehow automatically bring growth is being challenged by right and left, and so far Osborne and Cameron don’t seem to have a clear grasp of this whole area of policy.

    The second factor that this iluminates for me is the lack of internal party discipline within the Tories. Tyrie’s was a pretty severe attack, not just on economic policy, but it was also highly dismissive of pet Cameron projects like welfare reform and the Big Society.

    To have a senior and respected backbencher attack in such a manner deliberately to deraail the eve of conference momentum is very significant. Cameron doesn’t have many friends on the backbenches, and his authority comes purely from being PM and having his party assume he will remain so. This kind of highly uncoded attack from your own side suggests more fundamental divisions or lack of confidence within the party.

  32. @Amberstar – “So one the big messages of Ed’s speech, despite the monstering it got in the media, has struck a chord with the majority of voters. I’d say that’s good news for Labour.”

    I felt that the monstering had an element of fear about it. After all, it isn’t materially different from various things Cameron has said in the past. (Before party donations from people working in the city topped 50% of Tory party fundraising).

  33. I think it is more than the cuts not bringing growth…I believe you cannot get growth while you are threatening to sack thousands of public servants, freeze their pay and squeeze their pensions.

    It should have been far gentler and more consensual.

    Until the cuts are stopped you won’t get confidence back. Non-public servants don’t see this yet…all they can see is that the cuts are falling on someone else, and naturally they think that is a good idea.

    But sooner or later it will become clear that chopping back the public sector doesn’t make room for growth, it gets a lot of people out of the economy who were customers and consumers.

    Welfare cuts will be counter productive too as they will just lead to public spending elsewhere.

    I’ve said it before and sooner or later it will happen…if you are going to print money you might as well spend it on employment instead of giving it to the banks to sit on.

  34. @ALEC

    “I had a post put into moderation last night for reasons I can’t quite fathom out. ”

    If you post at exactly the same time as another, the post goes into moderation. I have seen this on numerous occasions. It is probably some form of flood protection to stop SPAM or duplicate posts.

    In regard to your last post, I think Cable gave the game away on a recent Question time. Another panel member said that the government had to secretely invest money in potential growth areas, without alerting the markets, as to do so might increase interest on bonds. Cable nodded his head agreeing with this, but did not say anything. I drew conclusion that the government may be secretely making funds available via regional investment bodies.

  35. Anthony,That is rather similar to an anecdote of Christopher Soames.At the age of seven he managed to
    get into his grandfathers study.”Are you the most important man in the world?” he asked.”Yes”replied
    Churchill”now bugger off”.

  36. Interestng to see DC apologising for his ‘sexist’ remarks in the Commons.

    “I obviously said some things in the House of Commons that just came out wrong and caused the wrong impression and I deeply regret that,”

    So, DC regrets causing the wrong impression? Will this apology achieve its aim of wooing women votes?

    Once again it seems he’s more interested in image than substance.

  37. Alec
    ‘I felt that the monstering had an element of fear about it. After all, it isn’t materially different from various things Cameron has said in the past. (Before party donations from people working in the city topped 50% of Tory party fundraising)’.

    Do the monstering of DC and NC which has been very common over the past 12 months show an equal element of fear, or is that fearles and deserved criticism.

    However, donations and party funding is raised yet again. Has the time come when only small donations of say maximum £20,000 in any one year is allowed.

    It would certainly put we Lib Dems on even playing field with the big two. If there was one thing I wish they would press for as part of the Coalition, it is that.

  38. @AmbivalentSupporter

    The thing is, we recently had an election where the party leader’s personal popularity, and more importantly movement in their popularity, was not reflected in the movement of voter intent polling, or crucially the final result. Despite Cameron being popular, and increasingly so as the election approached, the Conservatives kept losing support. While despite continuing and increasing personal popularity problems for Brown, Labour increased their polling substantially, and saw off what had been predicted as a Conservative landslide by many.

    So I can say that the evidence does not support your assertion that personal popularity polling is going to move polling in any significant way during an election campaign.

  39. “However, donations and party funding is raised yet again. Has the time come when only small donations of say maximum £20,000 in any one year is allowed.”
    Despite being promised, I doubt that party funding reform would pass.
    Why would the Tories destroy their own financial base?

    Of course, I’d like to completely scrap party donations and have publicly funded campaigns.
    The most practical solution would be proportional by election result. but my ideal would be to have each registered voter having a share of the total pot, which they then designate to a party of choice [1].
    Of course, there are the massive issues with fraud but that’s why you go with the more practical solution. ;)

    [1] This would be the first stage in my Machiavellian plot to reform the electoral system.

  40. @TingedFringe; Canada has a system where each party gets 2 Canadian dollars per vote they received at the last election.

  41. @ Henry

    It would certainly put we Lib Dems on even playing field with the big two. If there was one thing I wish they would press for as part of the Coalition, it is that.
    ————————————————–
    It wouldn’t. The Unions aren’t single contributors. They are agents for millions of donors… the right to opt out from the political part of Union subs – Thatcherite legislation – created the situation which Labour will benefit from in any donor legislation.

    As far as I can see, Labour & the Unions would easily find a way to work within any single donor limits legislation… the Tories & the SNP would be crippled by it – so it’s unlikely to go ahead.
    8-)

  42. £20k isn’t a small donation! Anyone who could afford to donate 20 grand to a political party must be pretty damn rich! If you were going to cap donations £100 or less would be reasonable, unless the sole aim is kneecapping union money while still enabling wealthy donors to give bundles of money.

  43. @Tinted Fringe
    “Canada has a system where each party gets 2 Canadian dollars per vote they received at the last election”

    To improve turnout etc, I propose a similar system for the UK, but with the cash being given to the voter rather than the party.

    Suggested name – the poll tax cut.

  44. “To improve turnout etc, I propose a similar system for the UK, but with the cash being given to the voter rather than the party.”
    I would have thought that a lottery system, with lots of prizes and one big prize would work better at encouraging turnou than a per capita system.

  45. @ ALEC

    “What I had hoped to comment on was Andrew Tyries comments on the coalition growth strategy.
    It seems clear from this that those criticising the government on this score are not just Labour supporters and the left.”

    If you have read Tyries piece for Policy Exchange you will realise that his criticisms come 180 degrees from the Ballsian solution of more expenditure.

    Tyrie’s call is for reforms which make markets freer.
    THe things he suggests are :-
    Freeing up Labour Market regulation.
    Focussing Financial Regulation on competition & choice.
    Enhancing Competition Policy.
    Educating young people in literacy & numeracy-then telling companies to train them-without expecting subsidies.
    Simpler Tax codes & lower taxes, including to encourage saving.
    Changing Planning regs to facilitate factory building.
    Challenge the Green Policies which add cost to industry & reduce competitiveness.
    Questions whether HS2 is the “right” priority on Transport spending.

    This is no cry for a Keynsian splurge.

    It is a good old fashioned right of centre call to get The Market working more effectively as the route to growth.

    If I were to sum it up I would use this quote from his paper :-

    “An agenda for economic freedom, less government and attention to the vital role that a small business sector can play has been in the party’s bloodstream for a long time. It has stood for spending restraint and opposition to the complex webs of taxation, subsidies (often targeted at big business interests) and
    regulation that grew up in that earlier era and have now, in somewhat different form, crept up on us again in the last decade and a half.

    So much of what is required is little more than common sense. If government gets out of the way, people can do more. ”

    He goes on to say that this approach is a different sell to the politics of the “age of abundance”-which is over-and explains why he thinks it is a neccessary message from the Conservative Party.

    ……so yes criticism-but not to be conflated with Ed Ball’s little list.

  46. @ CrossBat (from prior thread)

    How worried the Tories are by what they saw of Labour last week will become known as their conference unfolds. If they monster Miliband at every opportunity, I suspect he’s scored some hits; if they ignore him, and his party, then he should be worried.
    My view? I expect a lot of Miliband bashing in Manchester next week.
    ————————————————
    Baroness Warsi has kicked off the Tory conference by quoting parts of Ed M’s speech & blaming the last government… which the 2 Eds pretty much did themselves already. So you’re correct; the Tories know Ed M’s speech struck a chord, especially with swing voters which the Tories can’t afford to lose to Labour.
    8-)

  47. @Tinted Fringe

    You could call yours “The Voting Lottery”.

    Some might claim that we have one already.

  48. @ Amber
    “The Unions aren’t single contributors. They are agents for millions of donors”

    That view doesn’t seem to accord with that of Lord Levy before a Select Committe last January :-

    “But Levy said he wished to see a formula in future where unions merely acted as a “conduit” for individual donations.

    “A union is made up of its membership,” he said. “If the member decides he wants to support a political party, it may be the Labour party, then when they pay their dues to the union they mark down £50 to the Labour party, £50 to the Liberal Democrat party.

    “The union will then merely act as a collecting agent …

    “They could only pass over the totality of the individual donations of their union members to the party of their choice.

    “They could not just decide, ‘we want to give X amount to, in most circumstances, the Labour party’. They would only be a conduit.”

    The Guardian

  49. @ Colin & Alec

    But Osborne is not going for either Tyrie’s or Balls’ suggested solutions. He is pinning his hopes on $100Bn QE2 which is expected to go ahead, in 2 £50Bn tranches, beginning shortly after the conference.

    It’s forecast that QE2 will add enough to the economy to avoid the looming double-dip; the price will be another rise in inflation which will further erode the living standards of those on fixed incomes.

    Inflation is a price worth paying to avoid a double-dip (aka a scenario where Balls is proved to have been correct).
    8-)

  50. BERIOUS

    “£20k isn’t a small donation! ”

    With Quantitative Easing – it will be.

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