Tonight’s daily YouGov poll in the Sun has topline figures of CON 35%, LAB 41%, LDEM 9%. After a few polls showing even narrower leads at the end of August, including a couple as low as 1 point, they seem to be stablising at around 5 or 6 points. Don’t be surprised if conference seasons produces some up and down though – there is clearly no sign of such a movement from the Lib Dem conference yet, but the most significant movements normally come after the leaders’ conference speeches, so look out for the results tomorrow or at the weekend.


351 Responses to “YouGov/Sun – CON 35%, LAB 41%, LDEM 9%”

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  1. @ Chris Lane

    “Until very recently the Lord Chancellor could not be catholic in the UK.”

    That’s messed up. I’m glad the law has changed.

    “AJ Balfour called catholics a ‘morally and socially inferior people’. He had governed Ireland and was
    PM 1902-1905, but ironically brought about voluntary aided status for church schools, helping him to lose the 1906 General Election, when Lloyd George and Winston Churchill ran the campaign. ‘No Rome on the Rates’ for the ‘New Liberals’.”

    :( Ugh.

    As for Churchill and George, it’s strange to me that anyone can consider themselves a Liberal and promote discrimination against people simply because they’re Catholic (or any religion for that matter). Maybe it’s yet another difference in the British and American linguistic definition of a Liberal. Or was (I don’t think any of the current Liberal Democrats would ever run an anti-Catholic campaign).

    “Ernest Bevin called catholics black crows, and was against the EEC as it was being founded by catholics. Bullock’s biography confirms this, as does Hugo Young’s ‘This Blessed Plot’ and the ex head of the civil service Sir Peter Wall.”

    Sounds like a real ahole.

    “Hugh Gaitskell’s Thousand Years speech refers to catholicism as an argument against GB joining the then EEC (the speech in which ‘all the wrong people’ applauded- according to his wife.)”

    I’m kinda surprised that you could have a Labour Party leader say that. Even if it was the 1950’s or 1960’s.

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