The monthly Ipsos MORI political monitor for Reuters has been published. Topline figures are CON 34%(+2), LAB 40%(+1), LDEM 15%(+4). All the main parties are up, and other parties sharply down, but this will be largely a reversion to the mean after a rather odd MORI poll with a unusual sample last month. The Lib Dems are up to 15% – whereas we expect high Lib Dems from ICM, this is unusual for MORI, who for the last five months have had them between 9% and 11%. I’ll add my usual caveat about any unusual shifts in the polls – it may be the sign of something, or may just be a blip. Wait and see if it is reflected in other polling. Full tabs are here.

Incidentally, given I’m normally so ready to be rude about poor newspaper reporting of polls, I should give credit where it is due to the measured and reasonable reporting of the poll by Reuters, which correctly says that the figures are broadly unchanged and that it is too early to say whether the Lib Dem increase indicates a sustained shift in attitude. Entirely correct!

The YouGov/Sun daily polling results yesterday are here. Topline results are CON 36%, LAB 43%, LDEM 9%. On Libya, the proportion of people thinking the intervention is going well has crept further up: 54% think it is going well, 25% badly. However, suport for the intervention has returned to being pretty evenly split – 39% think it is right, 40% think it is wrong.


251 Responses to “Ipsos MORI/Reuters – CON 34, LAB 40, LDEM 15”

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  1. Scottish split (+/-change from UK GE 2010)

    Lab 47% (+5)
    SNP 26% (+6)
    Con 12% (-5)
    LD 7% (-12)
    UKIP 2% (+1)
    Grn 1% (n/c)
    BNP 0 (n/c)
    oth 4%

    Baxter gives:
    Lab 47 seats (+6)
    SNP 8 seats (+2)
    LD 4 seats (-7)
    Con 0 seats (-1)

    http://www.electoralcalculus.co.uk/scotland.html

  2. Another mid-teens score for the Lib Dems? Heh, now this is interesting…

    Do Ipsos Mori have similar polling methods to ICM?

  3. With two polls now showing Lib Dems in mid teens that is interesting.

    Though the most interesting thing IMO is that these improved performances don’t seem to be at the expense of Labour- given the assumption had been that the Labour increase and Lib Dem decrease since the GE were opposite sides of the same electoral coin.

  4. With the Lib Dems doing so badly in Scotland (and Wales?), which part(s) of England are they doing well in?

    LD VI by “GOR Regions” (note to Ipsos MORI -> neither England nor Scotland is a “GOR region”!)

    North 9%
    North excl. Scotland 9%
    Midlands 19%
    South 17%
    Greater London 11%
    England 16% (-8 from UK GE 2010)
    Scotland 7% (-12 from UK GE 2010)

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/shared/election2010/results/region/48.stm

    I have no idea how the Lib Dems did in each GOR region in May 2010, but the Midlands figure looks reasonably good(?)

  5. @Rob S

    “Though the most interesting thing IMO is that these improved performances don’t seem to be at the expense of Labour- given the assumption had been that the Labour increase and Lib Dem decrease since the GE were opposite sides of the same electoral coin.”

    Ah yes, dear old Eoin’s mantra of “yellow up, red down” is looking increasingly shaky, is it not?

  6. @Stuart Dickson

    “I have no idea how the Lib Dems did in each GOR region in May 2010, but the Midlands figure looks reasonably good(?)”

    Historically, the West Midlands has been a very poor hunting ground for the Lib Dems and an upsurge of support for them in this region, if true, would be a very interesting development.

  7. The change of heart currently appertaining to Libya, tells us a great deal. Imagine a bit of economic blue sky and a tasty little tax cut. Suddenly, the 6 or 8 % who think that Labour have anything better to offer would evaporate. Politicians are not allowed to be wrong and change their minds, but the public can do what it likes.

  8. Crossbat

    :D

    Oh yes

  9. It will take more than a little bit of economic blue sky to turn the coalition’s fortunes around. We saw with the good Q2 and Q3 figures last year that if people don’t see benefits on the ground, they will dismiss the figures out of hand. There is a time-lag between economic growth and jobs growth, and the way the global economy is going at the moment, it’s doubtful whether that will happen before the next election for a long enough period for people to see the benefits. I suppose they could try a tax cut, but that would probably come at a cost of breaking the promise to clear the deficit.

    There’s still plenty of unexpected events to sway the next election one way or the other yet to come, but it’s getting increasingly unlikely that the Tories will win it on the strength of their deficit reduction plan.

  10. Another poll which seems to be pointing towards an overall Labour lead of circa. 5 or 6%. No surprises really. The ICM poll seems to be totally out on its own in suggesting a 1% Tory lead (no surprises there!), and Yougov is at the uppermost end in suggesting Labour leads of 7 or 8%. 6% seems a fair reflection of the current state of polls IMO.

  11. Simon M – no, they have very different methods. Both use telephone sampling, but the similarities end there! Their weighting is very different (MORI are unique in not using any political weighting, ICM pioneered it), their attitude to likelihood to vote is different (ICM weight by likelihood to vote, MORI have a very harsh filter by likelihood to vote) and ICM reallocate don’t knows, while MORI have a squeeze question.

    Very important to note, is the different patterns here – while ICM have a higher level of Lib Dem support, they are not showing any significant *increase* in Lib Dem support. They have them pretty flat. The reason they had them high was due to systemic methodological reasons, not an increase in support.

    MORI on the other hand, normally show the same sort of Lib Dem score as the non-ICM companies – around 10% or so. So the 15% is a big increase for the Lib Dems… though we don’t know if it will be sustained in any other polling. Certainly the YouGov daily polling this week, some of which was conducted later than the MORI poll, hasn’t shown an increase.

  12. While I posted on the previous thread that this poll appears to give everyone something to cheer about, on reflection it probably isn’t very good news for the Tories.

    Of cource it’s only one poll, so as yet has very little real significance, but as others have pointed out, if we are witnessing a minor Lib Dem recovery without seeing a commensurate fall in Labour, then that’s extremely serious for Tory hopes.

    Far too early to make any judgements and far to far away from any election to worry about, but trends start somewhere and this will be one to watch.

  13. I tend to the view that ICM are mistaken in applying the spiral of silence to the LibDems in the same way that has happened re Tories and Labour voters – simply because far fewer people see themselves as core LibDem supporters.Much of their support is very soft with a significant inflow and outflow.The fact that somebody voted LD in 2010 does not make them a likely core voter who will return in due course – it’s simply where that person happened to be politically at the time in response to the Clegg factor etc.
    Fot that reason, I suspect ICM are overdoing the correction for a LibDem spiral of silence and pitching them a few points too high.

  14. The story is not the movement, the story is the lack of movement. It’s been a pretty busy year, with referendums, wars, Murdoch, even riots, and rumours of another collapse in Oct/Nov grow daily. Presumably pestilence and famine will be along momentarily…

    …but the polls haven’t really moved that much at all since January… :-)

    Regards, Martyn

  15. Graham – you’re view is, as it happens, the view Populus take. They reallocate former Conservative and Labour voters in the same way ICM do, but reallocate Lib Dems at a lower rate, and others not at all.

  16. @Graham – that’s an interesting thought, and one that intuitively seems to make sense, although we all know where intuition gets us when discussing polling.

    What are your thoughts on which of the other two main parties any pro Lib Dem bias from ICM would come from?

    On the Eurozone – although it’s barely gaining any kind of traction in the UK media and political circles, I’m fascinated by the developing crisis in Europe – and it really is a crisis.

    Apart from the fact that it looks like a number of huge Eurozone banks are slowly going bust as credit is withdrawn from the EU interbank markets, we also have a developing political crisis.

    The German president and the Bundesbank have roundly condemned the ECB bond purchases and the wider bail out as effective illegal under EU law. It’s beginning to dawn on people that the bailout could be ruled illegal by Germany’s constitutional court on September 7th (that would create a huge market reaction) and some of Merkel’s opponents, even within her own party, are saying they’ve had enough and are demanding bail out recipients place gold reserves and industrial assets on the table as debt collateral.
    Meanwhile the markets are starting to question whether Germany’s 83% debt to GDP ration means that they don’t have the financial strength to back the bailouts, even if they wanted to.

    As far as I can tell, those people like George Osborne who are calling for closer fiscal union are whistling in the wind. The German’s are effectively ruling this out, and I can’t see the Greek or Italian public backing the idea either. Europe, not just the Eurozone, is on the brink of falling apart, economically, politically and probably socially in many countries.

    I’m unsuccessfully trying to work out how this could translate into UK polling impacts. Short term we’re all but certain to have a second major credit crisis with all the attendent economic pain that would bring.

    Longer term, I believe that Europe and the union is up for grabs. The federalist dream is over and there will have to be a new settlement. Theoretically this ought to be manna from heaven for the Tories, but their leadership seems far keener to protect the status quo at present.

    Miliband by contrast has started to make more anti EU noises, and I can see a very strong electoral case to start linking demands for a new settlement to issues of immigration – something already being discussed inside Labour.

    Cameron’s biggest fear is probably a Eurosceptic Labour party, and the crisis unfolding gives everyone a chance to reassess their positions and craft a coherent new policy framework for themselves.

    It could also impact specifically on Scottish politics. The SNP is keen on Europe as a perceived bulwark for an independent Scotland, but I would be interested what the SNP contributors here think the impact of a collapsing EU might be on opinion north of the border.

  17. Alec,
    On the whole I would think that any overcorrection for a LibDem spiral of silence by ICM is hitting Labour more than the Tories – as evidenced by the other polling data we are seeing.

  18. As Anthony says, the Ipsos-MORI headline figures are based on ‘certain to vote’ – a total of 541 from 1002 – and that 541 includes 84 Undecideds and 24 Refuseds. (Not to mention 3 saying they are ‘certain to vote’ and that they ‘would not vote’ – let’s assume they are ballot-spoilers rather than insane). Even squeezing these 108 only gives you another 46 maybes, so the headline figures are based on 476 people, giving a margin of error of at least +/- 4.5 points.

    This means I’m slightly dubious about the 15% for the Lib Dems, especially as it drops to 13% if you consider those who say they are less than 100% certain to vote. Normally the pattern for Lib Dems is the other way round – a lot of ‘probably will vote but not sure’. Similarly Ipsos-MORI’s quote that:

    Nick Clegg’s personal ratings among Liberal Democrat voters have increased this month. Over half of his own party’s supporters are now satisfied with his performance (55% compared to 47% in July, while dissatisfaction has fallen from 41% to 29%).

    may also indicate that they just happened to pick up disproportionately many diehard Lib Dems this month (ignoring the fact that a jump from 47% to 55% isn’t even significant in a (weighted) sub-sample of 102.

    That’s not to say that YouGov is right either with a Lib Dem average a bit under 10%. As others have pointed out there are methodological problems there too. But people shouldn’t get too excited yet.

  19. Good afternoon from sunny Bournemouth as we teachers gear ourselves up for a new year. It will be my 33rd season at the crease, in the public sector as well.

    On a previous discussion about partisanship, I remembered words of a former colleague. He said:

    The flaws in human nature prevent socialism from ever working efficiently, while the positive elements of human nature mitigate the effects of free enterprise capitalism.

    On the question of partisanship, perhaps our own memories prejudice us.
    So Labour families would recall Tonypandy, the Means Test, Churchill’s words about the Gestapo and Bevan, Smethwick Man, the T shirts at Oxford about Mandela and the ‘Enemy within’ speech.

    No doubt Conservatives have their own visceral memories as well about socialists.

    I recognise the need to keep the thing in check and lie down in a quiet room sometimes when scratched, so thank you Anthony for the guidance.

  20. Perhaps part of the reason why we have “polldrums” so much is that the Conservative VI seems pretty much nailed at 36% at the moment. That just leaves movement between Lab and LD voters, perhaps amplified by methodology differences, and a tiny bit of churn between others and everyone else. Overall not that much.

    Once the Conservative vote moves, up or down, I think everything else will start moving too.

  21. Interesting to see that there is a good deal of criticism over the Swiss tax deal. Christian aid have apparently issued a press statement saying that it is colluding with criminality and will hurt the poor. On the other hand, Tories are pointing out than Labour didn’t have any deal in their term in office, with the line that at leasts it’s better than they managed.

    While there is a good deal of truth in this – all parties have been woeful at tackling this issue – it does look like this deal permits secrecy and tax avoidance and will actually encourage people to ship their wealth to Switzerland.

  22. As I understand it, the idea behind the deal is that if you choose to put your fortune in a Swiss bank account and keep your details secret, you will still have to pay UK tax on the interest, at an equal or higher rate than you would have paid had you opened an account openly. Hopefully that should clamp down on one bit of tax evasion.

    What it won’t stop is people secretly putting their earnings into a Swiss account without HMRC ever knowing you ever earned the money in the first place. Not sure how easy it is to earn that much money and stay under the HMRC radar, but this deal won’t make it any easier or harder than it was before.

  23. @Alec

    You said “…The federalist dream is over and there will have to be a new settlement. Theoretically this ought to be manna from heaven for the Tories, but their leadership seems far keener to protect the status quo at present…Miliband by contrast has started to make more anti EU noises, and I can see a very strong electoral case to start linking demands for a new settlement to issues of immigration – something already being discussed inside Labour…Cameron’s biggest fear is probably a Eurosceptic Labour party, and the crisis unfolding gives everyone a chance to reassess their positions and craft a coherent new policy framework for themselves…”

    Hannan’s Law: “There is no such thing as an Eurosceptic Government”

    This is a pithier restatement by Daniel Hannan of the observation by Simon Hix that the longer a party stays out of Government, the more Eurosceptic it becomes. The EU is not dropped on Europe by orbiting aliens, it’s built by the governments. Those governments build it according to what they consensually think it should be like. But parties who are outside government are not part of this consensus (by definition) and so see the EU evolving in a direction other than that they would prefer. Hence, Eurosceptic oppositions.

    A party in opposition need only satisfy its party members between elections, and the electorate at elections. But a party in government must satisfy other governments (whether the present ones of other countries or past versions of itself) and globalised industries such as banks, because other governments have guns, global banks are bigger than governments, and no country can survive in isolation (despite the best efforts of, say, North Korea). This is why we have international law, treaties, and trade. Hence, Cameron’s dilemma: the realities of government dictate that the UK will not – for example – leave the EU nor resile from the ECHR, but his party are convinced that both are realistic goals.

    Regards, Martyn

  24. ‘ Hence, Cameron’s dilemma: the realities of government dictate that the UK will not – for example – leave the EU nor resile from the ECHR, but his party are convinced that both are realistic goals.’.

    Nicely phrased.

    Or, in government people actually realise that the EU is needed. Those not involved do not recognise the complexity of the issue and go with the tabloid press.

  25. @CHRIS NEVILLE-SMITH
    I totally disagree with your view that the Tories are in deepest doo-doo regarding their efforts to resurrect the economy. People still remember why the economy is ultra weak and are reminded that spending what you have not got is dangerous, every time Greece, Spain, Portugal and Italy are mentioned. With regard to there being many a slip twixt cup and lip, of course I do agree with you, furthermore it applies in government AND opposition.

  26. @Chris Neville Smith – “As I understand it, the idea behind the deal is that if you choose to put your fortune in a Swiss bank account and keep your details secret, you will still have to pay UK tax on the interest, at an equal or higher rate than you would have paid had you opened an account openly. Hopefully that should clamp down on one bit of tax evasion.”

    I don’t think so. I understand the rates are 19% and 34%, so they are clearly below UK rates. The other factor is that HMRC will not know what money you have in the account – it has been acepted that UK tax authorities will have no power over this and will have to trust the Swiss authorities entirely.

    Some tax experts are actually saying the precise reverse of what you ahve said – namely that this deal now legalises a situation where it becomes advantagous to move your finances to Switzerland. Whereas in the past this was illegal but unlikely for you to be caught, now it’s legal but still cheats ordinary UK taxpayers.

    My bottom line is simple and the same as I would apply to rioters and looter – you pay the dues you owe. I fail to see why we accept secrecy and anything other than 100% compliance from swiss tax authorities. We should close all ties with any juristiction that fails to meet this test and make it a criminal act to trade, travel or engage in any third party business with such juristictions until we get full compliance.

    If we did that, the Swiss economy would collapse in about three days.

  27. @chris lane

    “No doubt Conservatives have their own visceral memories as well about socialists.”

    You betcha bippy.

  28. Alec

    “The SNP is keen on Europe as a perceived bulwark for an independent Scotland, but I would be interested what the SNP contributors here think the impact of a collapsing EU might be on opinion north of the border.”

    That would indeed be interesting, but I’m not sure that the EU will “collapse”. If it restructures into a different format, that may be no bad thing for all of Europe. A less centralist EU would suit the SNP nicely. Indeed, the recent suggestions of cental direction of corporation tax etc would take Scotland in the opposite direction from the one we want to move on!

    If the EU does collapse, however, new groupings will emerge. A sovereign Scotland within a British Isles or a Nordic grouping might both be quite attractive.

  29. Incidentally, the Saltcoats & Stevenston by election result will be out rather early in the morning. North Ayrshire is counting tonight, and using the electronic counting machines – partly as a reassurance that they won’t have the 2007 faults when they are used next year.

    The turnout is likely to be very low. When I left duty at a polling station at 3pm the turnout was 6.34%.

  30. @old nat
    The EU will not collapse. However, it will have to silence the siren voices from nondescript little nations who want everyone to go to bed together. A European Common Market has always been a good idea, the United States of Europe is unworkable and if the Eurozone proves anything it is that. The kind of Europe that may well emerge from all this is likely to appeal far more to the Conservative party membership. The Euro has done our work for us.

  31. @oldnat

    You said “…A sovereign Scotland within a British Isles or a Nordic grouping might both be quite attractive…”

    You probably got there before I did, but…

    * h ttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viking_Age
    * h ttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanseatic_League

    Regards, Martyn

  32. @Oldnat – thanks for that. To clarify, I shouldn’t have talked of the EU ‘collapsing’ – I was instead meaning much as you described – some form of restructuring, if not of the existing institutions then certainly of the expectations of future developments.

    The Euro crisis has demonstrated that Euro elites are rather bad at managing things, and while isn’t by any means restricted to intra national politicians, the democratic deficit within the EU means such failures are very hard to reverse as they would be within national democracies.

    The EU situation really does give parties a once in a generation chance to shift their thinking, and in some ways it may be to Labour’s advantage to be in opposition at such a time.

  33. Martyn

    “Hanseatic League”

    I don’t know if the same thing is happening in England, but the shift of economic activity away from the West Coast (ideal for trading with America and the British Empire) back to the East, where businesses involved with European trade has been quite noticeable.

    In the longer term, political dominance in the East may matter far more than that in the declining areas of the West.

  34. @Chouenlai

    “I totally disagree with your view that the Tories are in deepest doo-doo regarding their efforts to resurrect the economy. People still remember why the economy is ultra weak and are reminded that spending what you have not got is dangerous, every time Greece, Spain, Portugal and Italy are mentioned.”

    You are entitled to your own opinions on whose fault the state of the economy is, but that doesn’t mean that other people will think the same. Everyone has now made up their minds how much blame the last Government should take for the current economic situation, and that is factored in the polls. The longer we progress into this Parliament, the harder it gets for the incumbents to blame things on their predecessors. The Government staked their reputation on the economy recovering through private sector growth making up for public sector cuts, and if that fails to materialise, there’s no way Labour voters will suddenly change their mind, blame the economy on Labour and switch their vote to Conservative.

    (The one thing that might favour the conservatives is in the credit market goes completely tits-up and a consensus emerges that we would have been screwed had we gone with Labour’s deficit reduction plan, but we’re a long way from that situation yet.)

    Don’t confuse what the public ought to think (in your opinion) with what they actually think. They are not the same thing.

  35. @OldNat

    Although I can (if pressed) pronounce “Na h-Eileanan an Iar” correctly, have danced drunkenly on the banks of the Tay, said “where is Barclays’ cashpoint…ooops” out loud, know that Arran is an island, stood outside the Scottish Parliament building and gone “Oh. It’s very small”, been lectured on the cost of the tram system in Edinburgh, and do not use “The Highlands” as a synonym for “Scotland”, I must confess to some ignorance concerning the popularity or otherwise of Scottish ports…:-)

    As for the ones in England and Wales…I know the big container ports (Southampton, Tilbury, Felixstowe) are expanding, Grimsby is holding on, so is Cardiff, but Liverpool’s dying on its feet. But this is to an extent old news: the creation of big container ports to service global and European trade was the big post-WW2 story (look at where Rotterdam is). Whether we deal with Roman Britannia, the Viking North, Norman England, Imperial Britain or our current UK, ships will still shelter on the south and east and sidle up the Thames, Humber and Severn. So those ports will thrive whether in the EU or not…

    Regards, Martyn

  36. I’ve noticed that the price of gold has started to rapidly dip – a positive sign of market confidence or all those panic-buyers have got the volume that they need?

    Also, on polling – anybody know how much methodology would amplify changes?

    Average weekly figures for yougov have shown the LibDems go from about 9 to 9.4 since the ‘hackgate’ [1] information in July.
    Over the same period, Labour have gone from 42.3 to 42.9 and Con from 36.4 to 35.6 (this figure was already in decline – it peaked at the start of June).

    So could a small gain in LibDem favours (0.4) be amplified as a larger number by other pollsters?

    Bit of a silly question, I know.

    [1] Speaking of hackgate, Glenn Mulcaire was ordered by a court to release the names of those who commissioned his hacking but has not done so yet.
    Will he release it tomorrow or will he go to prison and keep his silence?

  37. @tingedfringe

    I think it’s profit taking prior to the Ben Bernanke speech tomorrow

    Regards, Martyn

  38. Martyn

    No doubt the seaports are a factor – it took 5 days to sail round Scotland with a bit of an aircraft carrier! – a thousand km, compared with only 80 km by road.

    Diageo moving their bottling to Fife from Kilmarnock, no doubt made economic sense for them.

  39. Interesting rise in LIBdem support – I for one did not expect this. It may be the focus on issues other than the economy and the coalition on the last month. As you say, this one is distinct from the ICM where the rise was based on mathodology.

    I don’t know why,

    For me, we are still in early days. I am surprised at the continued opposition to Libya intervention and support being equal ( more or less) I expected a big boost in support only to fall back to equality over the weeks and months of chaos and disruption to follow.

    @ Chouenlai

    Good to see that you have taken AW’s expressed concerns on partisanship on board. A “fair and balanced” account of election prospects I notice!

  40. Can someone explain how you get the party colours to show when you post? I have registered but only seem to have the options of: My profile/Dashboard/Shortlink. None of which give you party allegiance options.
    Am I missing something or ‘Is it me?, as Terry Wogan used to say.

  41. The Guardian has run an article saying that Nick Clegg will not allow the Tories to water-down the ECHR – the implication being that there is a split between himself and Cameron.
    His actual article has no split.

    But there is no split between them – Cameron may like to bash the ECHR to please his euroskeptics but if you look at what he actually says, he is against the abuse of human rights as an excuse, not actual human rights.

    Yougov –
    37, 42, 9, approval -23

    There does seem to be a bit of a shift post-libya to an improved Tory VI and improved approval – but obviously we have to wait a few more days to see if this is confirmed/a blip.
    Good news for the Tories, either way.

  42. Just got the latest YouGov survey

    “Do you think English universities should or should not be allowed to charge different fees to students from different parts of the United Kingdom?”

    What a stupid question! If the English Government decides that they will set fees, then that’s what they will do. The only possible context in which that question would have any meaning is if the devolved Governments decided that their Universities should charge fees, but the English Government thought that students should not have to pay tuition fees.

    Anyone who imagines that the English would provide free University education to students from across their borders who would happily take advantage of that facility needs their head examined!

  43. Robert Newark

    You need to click the link to “Your extended Profile”

  44. Positive shift in Libya polling –
    Right/Wrong from 39-40 to 42-36.

    And going well/badly shift from 54-25 to 58-22.
    Which may explain the boost to approval.

  45. If we see another 37/42/9 tomorrow, then unweighted weekly averages will stand at –
    Con – 36.4 (+0.8)
    Lab – 43 (+0.4)
    Lib – 9 (-0.6)

    But another 37/42/9 would indicate the start of a shift from Lab to Con which would show more in next week’s figures.
    Bring on sunday!

  46. Last month the archive figures were Con 31%, Lab 42%, LD 10% (100% likelihood to vote brings us to last month’s headline Con 32%, Lab 40%, LD 11%).

    The archive figure for this month’s Ipsos Mori is Con 34%, Lab 40%, LD 13% (without the 100% likely to vote proviso).

    So last month strict likelihood raised Con and LD by one point each, and reduced Lab by two points: this month Con and Lab VI are unchanged by the filter, but it elevates LD by two points.

    Again I wonder if it is reasonable to ask a hypothetical question [How would you vote if there were an election tomorrow?] and expect an absolutely certain answer [What! An election on Sunday?*].

    *Feildwork 20-22 August.

  47. Billy Bob

    “An election on Sunday?”

    Makes a lot of sense!

  48. @ Billy Bob

    “An election on Sunday?”
    ——————-
    If only ;-)

  49. Amber

    You are just envisaging that a Sunday election would mean hordes of churchgoers heading for the polls after a message from Ewan Aitken urging them to vote Labour to save their souls! :-)

  50. I think Amber’s just thinking of the fun of watching the (n x Wee) Frees agonise if they can vote or not without losing their immortal souls.

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