Full results for the Sunday Times/YouGov poll are now up here. As you’d might expect, given it’s silly season and it’s the only story in the news, the focus is again on the riots.

On the regular leadership trackers there is little change – David Cameron’s job approval stands at minus 12 (from minus 14 last week, and typical of late), Ed Miliband’s is minus 18 (from minus 22, still holding onto the increase he got from hackgate), Nick Clegg’s is minus 42.

As in the Channel 4 poll yesterday the primary causes of the riots are seen as criminality, gang culture and bad parenting (all named by 61% of people when asked to pick the main causes, and the top three when asked to pick the ONE main cause). That is followed, a long way behind, by social deprivation (23%) and unemployment (18%). Very few people though that the government’s cuts (10%) or poor policing (11%) were amongst the main causes.

45% think Cameron responded well to the riots (52% badly), 44% thought Boris responded well (45% badly). These are significantly up on similar questions YouGov asked for the Sun when the riots were still ongoing, which had 28% saying Cameron was doing well and only 24% for Boris – people are presumably viewing their reactions a lot more positively now things have quietened down. In contrast Theresa May is still seen as having reacted badly to the riots (31% well, 53% badly). For the opposition, 40% thought Miliband did well (40% badly) and Harriet Harman 26% well, 44% badly.

66% think the police responded well to the riots, with 31% saying badly – again this is significantly up on YouGov’s poll for the Sun in the week when the number thinked they’d handled it well was 52%. Asked how much confidence they have in the police to protect people and property from rioters 53% of people have some or a lot of confidence, 37% do not have a lot of confidence, 9% have none at all.

On the police cuts 56% of people think they should be cancelled, even if this means bigger cuts elsewhere. 23% of people think they should go ahead. Amongst the COnservative party’s own supporters 47% think the police cuts should be cancelled.

Finally there were some questions on Cameron’s “broken society”. YouGov re-asked a question from back in 2009 about whether people though Britain was a broken society, in regard of the area people themselves lived in, and in relation to the country as a whole. 37% think it is true in relation to the area they live (which is significantly down from 2009 when YouGov originally asked the question) with people most likely to agree in London. 74% think society is broken in Britain as a whole, virtually unchanged from 2009. Comparing ourselves to other European countries, 38% of people think British society is more broken than in other countries, 13% that British society is stronger and more stable and 39% that they are much the same.

There is very little confidence in the government’s policies solving the problems of “broken Britain” – only 22% think the government’s education policies will improve or mend society, 27% their welfare policies, 26% their law and order polices and 22% their economic policies. In every case a larger proportion of respondents think the government’s policies will make the problems in British society worse.


266 Responses to “YouGov/Sunday Times on the riots”

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  1. KATIE

    ” but I don’t really think my views would add anything to the conversation.”

    That is not the case at all Katie.

    Your views are as interesting as anyone elses.

  2. @ Colin – EM said the bankers “ruined our savings” -when did they do that actually. THey lent a lot of money to people who weren’t credit worthy, took bonuses for doing it, then asked the taxpayer to fund the bad debt write offs……..but how & when did they ruin our “savings”.?

    Perhaps he was referring to –

    a) Icesave and the other Icelandic banks. Individuals who had savings in that would have lost everything but for the Labour Govt’s decision to cover people’s losses. Councils had millions invested with them too, don’t think they got everything back?

    b) the current, long-lasting, record low interest rates that are only in operation to cover the fallout from financial meltdown. From a saver’s point of view they are ruinously low. Below the inflation rate so savers effectively losing money?

  3. @Woodsman

    Thanks

    I doubt very much that he was refering to b) since it is a result of BoE MPC decisions-which are solely a function of their inflation target objectives.

    If it was a) he should have said “Icelandic Bankers”.

    Actually I think it was just a mistake -or a misunderstanding of what “bankers” actually did do.

  4. Milliband wants to be very careful with his response to the riots as at the moment Cameron seems to be making all the running and his views seem to accord with public opinion. Although Milliband has called for an enquiry, that is all that he has really come up with, apart from criticising Cameron’s ideas. He was put in a difficult position with Harman and Livingstone’s opening gambits ,which clearly the public did not agree with according to the polls and he wisely chose not to support their views.
    Listening to the Radio 4 news he was described as being well behind the curve with his response today.
    Perhaps he is falling back into his pre hacking mode. He needs to pull his socks up or his personal ratings could well start to fall.

  5. @ COLIN & DINgo

    I prefer Ed Milibands approach to Camerons, because I think Ed is looking for practical solutions that can work and are affordable. Cameron is just coming out with a range of ideas, without any substance behind them. Ed should challenge Cameron to come forward with more detail and not just go for easy headlines.

  6. R HUCKLE

    “Cameron is just coming out with a range of ideas, without any substance behind them. ”

    The social breakdown related policies &anti-gang initiatives are based on IDS’ published studies over 8 years when he ran Centre for Social Justice.
    You would need to explain what “substance” they lack.

    The policing policies , one presumes will be informed by the advice DC stated he intends to take-ie Strathclyde Police experience & Mr Bratton.
    Its probably a little premature to say these lack substance. Certainly if the Strathclyde CIRV initiative is drawn upon, lack of substance would be a mistaken criticism.

  7. R HUCKLE

    ‘Ed is looking for practical solutions.’
    Really. I haven’t actually heard him say anything other than he wants a public enquiry. I have not heard any constructive suggestions from him, in fact I haven’t actually heard any suggestions from him. Not been a good week for ED so far.

  8. Colin,
    The chief constable of Strathclyde police has applied for the Met commissioner job.
    This would probably help Cameron out quite a lot – he has experience and shouldn’t cause any internal political problems with the police.

  9. @ COLIN

    Specific details of plans, rollout/pilot schemes and budgets. It ok relying on IDS studies, but we have a different financial situation.

    @ DINgo

    Ed Milibands wants to review all aspects and allow communities to have more say on how they can be part of the solutions required. I think it is true that is some areas gangs have taken over and therefore you need to find a way of loosening their grip, without making the situation worse. There are many people in some of these areas who have no confidence in the Police and if they went in heavy handed, you could end up with more violence, not less.

  10. @ Dingbat

    Milliband wants to be very careful with his response to the riots as at the moment Cameron seems to be making all the running and his views seem to accord with public opinion.
    —————————–

    er well not according to AW’s comments above.

    There is very little confidence in the government’s policies solving the problems of “broken Britain” – only 22% think the government’s education policies will improve or mend society, 27% their welfare policies, 26% their law and order polices and 22% their economic policies. In every case a larger proportion of respondents think the government’s policies will make the problems in British society worse.

    Sorry to rain on your parade. 8-)

  11. “I doubt very much that he was refering to b) since it is a result of BoE MPC decisions-which are solely a function of their inflation target objectives.”

    But Colin they are not operating in a vacuum. We know that if they were serious about keeping inflation to target they would have raised rates by now. They are constrained from doing so because of the fundamental weakness of the economy due in no small part to the banking crisis.

  12. Katie,please continue to post.When I first posted I was
    absolutely roasted by Roland Haines who made suggestive comments and compared me to a dead sheep.However he was notorious and fortunately does
    not seem to post anymore.The more people that post the
    better or else things become rather cliquey.

  13. @Woodsman

    “I doubt very much that he was refering to b) since it is a result of BoE MPC decisions-which are solely a function of their inflation target objectives.”

    But Colin they are not operating in a vacuum. We know that if they were serious about keeping inflation to target they would have raised rates by now. They are constrained from doing so because of the fundamental weakness of the economy due in no small part to the banking crisis.

    —————————————

    Absoutely.

    As a retiree with rapidly diminishing savings, I cannot understand why the BoE MPC and the Chancellor re so nonchalont about the way inflation is ravaging the savings of ordinary people.

  14. @Tinged

    Thanks -very interesting news indeed.

  15. Stephen House being reported as favourite to get it.

    Looks like a good move

  16. Colin, I’d be very happy to see him get the job.

    Any man who can make a serious improvement to the trouble-strewn streets of Glasgow has considerable to offer to the Met.

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