Tonight’s YouGov poll for the Sun has topline figures of CON 35%, LAB 43%, LDEM 11%. It looks as though the bigger Labour leads of up to 8 points that YouGov have shown since the phone hacking scandal hit its peak haven’t quite faded away yet after all.


481 Responses to “YouGov/Sun – CON 35%, LAB 43%, LDEM 11%”

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  1. Down to 35%……interesting.

  2. I wonder what the polling impact of the impending disaster in the Eurozone will be. Speaking as someone who inadvisedly transferred quite a lot of money from his (sterling) bank account onto a (Euro) Prepaid Mastercard, I am hoping the collapse takes at least another three weeks so I have time to spend it…

  3. Another record: lowest Cameron lead over Miliband as best PM (+9%).

  4. Continuing the theme of the previous thread, the recalled 2010 vote in this YouGov poll is likely to be flattering to Labour (as often seems to be the case). That is, the proportions are 34% Con, 30% Lab, 26% LD or thereabouts. Bring those proportions closer to what actually happened in 2010 and the Labour lead would fall back a bit from 8%.

  5. Ronnie

    Not really or are you being ironic.

    Thought Cameron bounced back today, until Jeremy Hunt let the cat out the bag that Cameron had discussed BSkyB with News Corp employees that he met socially. Suppose it depends on whether people trust Camerons word that these conversations were not inappropriate.

  6. Re posted from the last thread;

    Really think everyone on here (honorable exception of @Adrian B) has been asleep at the wheel tonight.

    I’ve been quite firm that Cameron has not been in serious trouble (in terms of resigning) over Hackgate, but today’s debate has provided some potentially explosive stuff. Once again, I think Ed has chosen the right battleground.

    It may still all come to nought, but Cameron has admitted he talked to NI people about the Bskyb bid, and Hunt has confirmed this. The battleground is now whether these conversations were appropriate or not.

    Any sensible view of this from a PM’s point of view should be that the only appropriate conversation on such an issue at such a time must be ‘I’m sorry I can’t discuss this’. If conversations extended to anything more than this they are inappropriate in my book.

    I expect a slew of FOI requests for details of the 26 meetings Cameron has confirmed took place, and while the details of conversations may never see the light of day, my view is that Cameron is now in extraordinarily dangerous waters. For the first time I can foresee a resigning issue arising from this.

    He clearly talked to NI about the bid and knew he could not deny this – to do so would have been to lie to Parliament, which would be terminal. Had he got total confidence that no details of these meetings would ever be published, my guess is that he would have denied the bid was discussed.

    That he couldn’t, tells me that he either suspects that former NI friends may one day come clean about the discussions or that there are some official records of these, with, in either case, the definition of what is ‘appropriate being unclear.

    I think Cameron is now in deep, deep trouble, but no one seems to have noticed.

  7. Another big Labour lead, yet disapproval of the Government has eased back to -23%. Unusual that.

    Could it be that the lowest yet Cameron lead over Miliband as best PM might have something to do with it? (Now only 9% as Craig notes, compared to 16% back in June.)

  8. Could be worse.

    Almost certainly will be ere long.

  9. @Colin – might not be – governments tend to pick up support during crises, but it will be interesting to see what happens with regard to GDP figures.

    Lest anyone think I’m obsessed with Hackgate, the far bigger story has always been the Euro crisis, and to be perfectly honest I’ve no idea how this will play out with UK VI polling.

    UK economic performance will be a key poll shifter if it is negative, but the Euro crisis is much harder to call in terms of UK party support.

  10. @Alec,

    Much as I hate to comment on the subject, unless there is some information in the public domain that I have missed, you are treating an interpretation of Mr Hunt’s remarks as if they were undisputed fact.

    His words, as reported by Hansard, were;

    “The right hon. Member for Blackburn (Mr Straw) returned to the question that the Prime Minister addressed continually in his earlier statement about whether there had been discussions about the BSkyB deal. The discussions that the Prime Minister had about the BSkyB deal were irrelevant. They were irrelevant because the person who had the responsibility..”

    This could be perfectly sensibly interpreted as meaning that the subject of whether any discussions took place with the PM about the BSkyB deal is irrelevant. To my knowledge Cameron hasn’t admitted to having any such discussions, and Hunt reiterated within seconds that Cameron hadn’t admitted to any such discussions (hence the comment to the Speaker about ministers contradicting themselves).

  11. @ R HUCKLE
    Ironic…but there is a drift (though it is well within MOE). Cons have only been on 34 on 2 occassions since the GE in YG polls.
    So will be interested to see if there is a real drift and if it has any permanence to it.
    I would hold judgement for a week by which time the impact of the “furore” will have made its mark…or not.

    @ ALEC
    I posted yesterday that this would make no difference to DC, unless Labour would be able to make a true ‘wrong’ stick on DC,,,which I could not see happenning.
    I have read others (and not restricted to those of a blue shade) who also felt it would have 0 impact.
    So not everyone is “asleep”.

  12. YouGov got Lib Dems in double fugures. Catching up with the other pollsters at last?

  13. @ ALEC
    Sorry…..I should have read your whole post.
    You are obviously making the opposite point to my last post.

    However…….
    I agree if DC was under the forensic judgement of a ‘court’ he would be in serious trouble.
    There is definitely a lack of ‘the whole truth’ from DC.
    I do not think however, in the court of public opinion he is in that great trouble until the end of the Inquiries – who will have to make something serious stick on him.

    If that doesn’t happen until after the next GE…as I think I have just heard on Newsnight tonight will be the case…..then does he really have anything to worry about?

  14. I was thinking about how the hacking/cosy relationships might actually impact VI. Given that a fair proportion of people are on holiday (I know state schools have broken up in some parts of the country), then a story has to run more than one week before everybody who is paying attention to the news media gets to hear of it. Even then, most people now (I think) don’t buy a newspaper or watch a full-length (>15 minutes) news programme 5(+) days a week. When they do catch some news, they are unlikely to pay much attention to much apart from the first hundred words or so of the top couple of stories.

    On that basis, the fact that DC made quite a good fist of deflecting attention/returning fire in the debate today, and that the LDs asked some telling questions, become pretty irrelevant for public opinion.

    What was relevant was that DC looked pretty weak and defensive on the central thrust, and EM landed a couple of blows. I suspect the erosion in DC’s approval rating will have continued to some extent, and it will contribute slightly to a long term (ceteris paribus) weakening of his party’s standing in the polls. But the story will have to continue for several weeks, or re-appear several times, for it to have the maximum impact on public opinion it might have (without any further major revelations/trials/convictions – they could increas the impact on public opinion in themselves).

    In the longer term it may well be that Alec is right (picking up on an issue in my post of 12.42 today in the previous thread, btw), and the question of DC having ‘appropriate’ conversations with NI about the BSkyB bid will prove to be something that moves public opinion further than repeats of the DC/Andy Coulson story, but again, we need to remember how many days a story needs to be at the top of the news agenda to have a significant effect on public opinion.

  15. The latest 4 polls – excluding the likely outlier that put the LD on 16% and Cons ahead – give C 34.5 L 40.75 and LD 10.5 Oth 14.25. For what its worth – polls will be up and down over the enxt 4 (?) years.

    I do not buy the line of some commentators that “Hack(er)gate”it is a “distraction”. It has been serious in that it has been detrimental to public trust and democracy generally. It has bruised DC. He is diminished but still standing.

    The real test for him and the govt will be what someone else referred to – the crisis in the Eurozone. I fear (and I mean fear) that they are right and that another financial crisis will hit sooner rather than later. Even if a rabbit is pulled from the hat in Brussels in next couple of days and Washington shortly after that, that will only buy a little time. It is coming and I think the consequences will be serious.

  16. valerie (on the previous thread)

    “Reasons to vote SNP: No tuition fees and free care for the elderly.”

    Actually, the 2011 result rather suggests that neither was a big factor in why people voted SNP despite both being deeply embedded in Scottish values and history.

    Compulsory education, albeit for only for the eldest sons of landowners was a Scottish first, but it was the reformation duty on any householder – even female ones – to provide religious observance and religious education to anyone staying overnight, including servants and visitors, that was the proximate cause of the Scottish Enlightenment, earlier universal literacy and the fact that Scotland retained four universities and made good use of two in Holland for several centuries while England had only two.

    Literate and numerate Scots with a fear of hellfire to keep them honest made a critical contribution to the industrial revolution in England as bookkeepers and cashiers. As today, employers paid no attention to those objecting to their use of immigrant labour.

    In the successful response to the three Cholera epidemics of the 19th C and the willingness of the burgers to sing, dance and eat at formal dinners all winter in order to raise funds for charity hospitals while paying for public health, water, and sanitation improvements for which mainly the poor benefited is the root cause for a more public and better funded NHS than in England.

    The justification of sparsity and morbidity that is used to excuse the disparity is not the reason the extra funding is there. High morbidity means that there is a greater need for health promotion, and less need to fund an expensive sickness service.

    In my opinion, respect for, and a readiness to defend, free education, health and sanitation is a large part of what it means to be Scottish.

    If there was no devolution, and a UK government attempted to do in Scotland what is proposed in England for health and education, there would be blood on the streets.

    Having said that, you can see from the 2010 result that what happened is that negative voters within the Highland and NT Libdem vote who were actually anticons split about 4:1 in favour of the SNP rather than Labour, and a similar number of formerly Labour voting anticons in the central belt went over to SNP.

    This meant that all three parties were now more evenly distributed but the anticons are in two parties rather than three and the remaining only 15 FPTP Labour seats in the Scottish Parliament are now all marginals.

    If SNP were the main beneficiaries from the LibDem collapse it is mainly because they seemed the better buy for LibDem voting anticons, but also partly because the workaholic Rural Affairs minister is dealing with a plethora of issues that townies like me know nothing about and could not spell many of the words you need to use to speak about them.

    It seems every living thing in, around or above Scotland is getting long neglected attention, and that impresses a wide range of people living in rural areas especially commercial fishermen in the NE.

    Richard Lochhead MSP for Moray would not be recognised in a Glasow supermarket, but is a celebrity in a fish market. I would give him the credit personally for the success of the SNP’s last list MSP in his region, a new MSP who had no expectation of being elected. – and maybe another in Highland in the same position.

    Pollsters often ask which party do you trust with the NHS.

    I was in a senior position in the NHS when Barbara Castle was in Health. Scottish Labour had two outstanding Health Ministers, but the current Scottish Health Secretary is the most effective and committed of any health minister known to me in either NHS since Barbara Castle. When Barbara Castle was Health Minister, Nicola Sturgeon was in Primary 1, so not a direct influnce perhaps.

    4% of the population in work are in the NHS. They have friends and families.All of us are potentially patients. The fact that the NHS is in the safest of hands and that what is proposed in England is incomprehensible in Scotland may be at least as important as free prescriptions.

    It’s not just the money. It’s about values.

  17. @Neil A – Cameron has admitted to having discussions regarding the bid, in any practical sense. If the bid had not been discussed, he would have said so, so let’s put that one to bed.

    The essence of Hunt’s defence as quoted in Hansard is that Cameron’s discussions on this matter were completely appropriate as he wasn’t the man making the decision on the bid. I’m increasingly getting the feeling that Cameron is hiding behind the fact that he wasn’t the man making the decision, and that this could be the basis of his definition of ‘appropriate’.

    Given the links between Cameron, Hunt and NI and between Cameron and Hunt themselves, I find it very difficult to believe these discussions were appropriate. On a very basic level, if NI raised the issue, Cameron would surely have said ‘Look – this is nothing to do with me so there’s no point discussing it’, so why did they have the conversations?

    I also find it a striking position for the Tories to take when we see the PM and other Tory backbenchers using Rebekah Brookes evidence to try to confirm that no inappropriate discussions took place. We need to know precisely what the judgement of appropriateness was based on, and if it was purely a Chinese wall between Cameron and Hunt then he will be in deep trouble.

    While everyone is innocent until proven guilty, I’m almost certain that you will apply a significantly different level of suspicion when dealing with suspects than you are applying here. As ever though, proof is the key. I still believe though, that the crisis has now moved and Cameron is at maximum risk.

  18. Q2 GDP figures are out next Tuesday. From various opinions I have seen on the net, it is not expect to offer any great relief for the government. Assuming those analysts are right. Any growth would be welcome, no matter how feeble.

  19. I guess the only reason Brooks and Cameron admitted to ‘appropriate’ discussions about BSkyB rather than no discussions was that someone will be able to say BSkyB came up during meetings, however innocently. The only person likely to have been party to their conversations, and with a potential motive to make trouble, is Coulson. The sums add up, Coulson looks increasingly likely to go down, and then may decide to sing, and at that point DC and RB will be far more comfortable having admitted conversations, rather than denying them completely……..any conjecture in the meantime that this is ‘deep trouble’ for Cameron is even more far fetched than my Coulson theory… :-)

  20. @KeithP – I think Hackgate has set the government up for the GDP figures. It would be a surprise if they are particularly good (>0.3%+) and if they at the top of expectations at +0.3% I think the reports will be of sluggish growth and the government will not take any great polling benefit.

    However, I think the narrative in the media has now changed, so if we have poor or negative growth, I think they might go after the government. Hackgate has changed the mood, and as a result any bad news will be greatly amplified.

  21. @alec

    “I think Cameron is now in deep, deep trouble, but no one seems to have noticed”

    IMO- and I *wish* it were not so- it is not that people have failed to notice. It is just simply that Cameron is not in trouble.

    He has lost a lot of his sheen make no bones about that. At times he has looked very shaky and/or dodgy. But EdM could not land any significant blows on him (either today or to be honest in the last week).

    EdM needs to get back to the economy, local government finance, the NHS and education ASAP. These are areas of policy where the public are currently- if the polls are to be believed- utterly unconvinced by the Conservative government.

    We on the centre left and left have had a good few weeks and the ‘old digger’ has been effectively neutered- as most probably has malpractice by tabloids.

    But its back to bread an butter matters now and post haste IMHO.

    Plus raising those personal likeability levels so that being 9% *behind* Cameron is not viewed as some kind of amazing triumph !!!

  22. I think it was ICEMAN in an earlier thread who noted that because Coulson was so close to Cameron and obviously working at No: 10, then the police would not be able to inform DC (or the Home Sec) about some of their hacking enquiries in case DC talked about any such matters to Coulson and ruined any case the police were building.

    This could also turn out to be a ‘smoking gun’ issue.

  23. Pleased to see that LDs have had several 11s in the past week. However, imo these figures should be higher. As I have written previously, the past two weeks have provided an ideal opportunity to put the tuition fee fiasco behind us. Although, as more than one poster has commented, LD MPS put some searching questions today, what percentage of the electorate would recognise them as LD MPs.

    IMO, this was the final opportunity for Clegg to state his and the LD position and to a certain extent put some distance between him and Cameron. DC had no such reservations during the AV referendum. Clegg is probably the only LD recognised by the majority of the electorate so I feel he has wasted a great opportunity.

    Nevertheless, hopefully we will remain in double figures over the summer and slowly build from there after the hols.

  24. @Rob Sheffield – I agree, and I think that this affair will help Ed to gain credibility when he talks about these other issues.

  25. Don’t believe for a second that hackgate is over. Once the inquiries are up and running we are going to see where Labour’s bodies are buried, and there will likewise be no mercy.

  26. Alec

    I tend to agree with you on this. For the very first time in this affair I thought DC looked vulnerable, on the BSkyB issue. Even if he is technically innocent of any misdemeanour, it strikes me that he was exceptionally foolish to be discussing the bid with members of NI. That does make me question his judgment.

  27. I’ve not read other threads today so imagine this may well have been covered. Piers Morgan calling out Tory Committee member Louise Mensch for what appears to be a direct lie during yesterday’s hearings, said (on two separate occassions, tellingly, as though to be sure to get it out there) for the cameras, and spreading the responsibility for these hacking activities to “all the papers” including this “former Mirror editor”. It’s a bit long, but worth it to watch her looking rather panicked and squirming.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsJwM1DnLu4

    The reason I draw attention to this is I’ve noticed as this scandal has rumbled on that across the internet and beyond those with a pro conservative or anti labour leaning, perceiving the PR damage to the prime minister and apparent boost to the opposition have coalesced increasingly around 3 lines of defence, to dismiss the significance of these events in one way or another. The following lines are getting repeated more and more like a mantra online and in discussion shows:

    1) The public are all bored with this now, move on.
    2) It happened when Labour was in power and/or they sucked up to Murdoch too.
    3) It’s not just News International..its all of the papers too, when are they going to look at them!?

    1 is almost certainly true. 2 is willful misunderstanding – or genuine lack of comprehension due to the boredom factor causing a loss of attention – of the sole political aspect of this scandal. (Namely reactions and responses to apparent forewarnings about the man Coulson, not about general friendly dealings with the murdochs.) And 3 is possibly the most interesting line of defence of all.

    The “all the other papers” line seems to me to be largely based on self association between the murdoch papers and the Conservatives, or at least conservative sensibilities. That an attack on one is to the detriment of the other, and that when they speak of other papers they really principally mean the Mirror Group, who “belong” to the enemy. There may well be skeletons in their cupboards but no evidence of any equivalent scandal or large scale corruption to justify the assertion has been proposed by anyone as far as I can tell.
    It strikes me that Mrs Mensch’s apparent brazen lie for the cameras about “the former Mirror editor” is very much part of this conservative line of defence number 3. To invent instantly disprovable quotes from a readily available book in taking it to an extraordinary level.

  28. @Neil

    @Alec

    Much as I hate to comment on the subject, unless there is some information in the public domain that I have missed, you are treating an interpretation of Mr Hunt’s remarks as if they were undisputed fact

    ==========================

    I’m sorry Neil, but I think you may be clutching at straws here. 8-)

    I just watched the incident on Sky news – not the ‘leftie’ BBC.

    Beforehand.The Sky reporter stressed that Hunt had made a ‘blunder’ and the viewer should watch DC’s expression while Hunt is speaking. Then, Hunt is shown saying any discussion about BSkyB the PM may have had with NI executives is irrelevent because it is his decision, not the PM;s.

    Actually I felt a bit sorry for Cameron. He spent all day at the crease stonewalling and then was run out by Hunt!

  29. @Sergio

    “Once the inquiries are up and running we are going to see where Labour’s bodies are buried, and there will likewise be no mercy.”

    I find it inconceivable that Labour figures will be found to have conspired with representatives of NI to hack into their political opponents’ phones so as to get access to politically useful information.

  30. @Sergio – appreciate the non partisan tone of your last post.

    FWIW – one little reported fact from yesterday was that Cameron’s people were pointing out to journalists on the flight back from SA that it was Osborne who recommended Coulson to Cameron. They were even pointing to Rebekah Brookes evidence in committee to back up their point.

    If this is the first sign that Cameron is worried about a threat from Osborne it doesn’t bode well for the government. I also find it striking that for two days in succession Cameron has relied on Brookes to provide corrobotatting evidence for his claims.

  31. If he survives, the “second chance” idea is going to come back to bite Cameron. There will be a range of Labour posters, all themed on Tory political disasters, each saying something like “Does this man deserve a second chance?”

  32. I meant to say,I think it is key that Hunt used the word ‘ irrelevant’ rather than inappropriate. i.e. It didnt matter what DC said because he did not have a say in the decision making process.

  33. Every time I think Coulsongate has no more to offer it keeps on giving.

    We’ve got “appropriate” conversations on bSkyb bid. We’ve got Labour’s “top level” blocking of investigation. We’ve got Coulson not being properly vetted. A juicy row between Gus O’Donnell and Nick Raynsford involving accusations of Coulson bugging a senior civil servant whilst working at number 10. We’ve got a promise that if Coulson is found guilty of anything, Cameron will apologise.

    But the thing that is now clear is how dependent Cameron is upon Brooks and others at NI to stay “onside”. That’s a bad place for a PM to be when he’s supposed to be cleaning up Dodge.

  34. @valerie – that was rather the point I was making. Hunt appears to have admitted the Cameron/NI discussions took place, but with the test of appropriateness being based on the fact that Hunt himself took the decision.

    This is extraordinarily weak ground for Cameron to defend – if he had no say in the matter, why bother wasting any time discussing it?

    Trouble ahead.

  35. @Alec

    “This is extraordinarily weak ground for Cameron to defend – if he had no say in the matter, why bother wasting any time discussing it?”

    What is more, Hunt has stated that he avoided 1-1 meetings with Cameron so that no-one thought they were discussing the bid. Why would meetings between them be a problem, unless Cameron was compromised?

  36. @Valerie,

    I am not clutching at straws, merely applying my logical mindset to what was said. If a statement like Hunt’s was presented in a criminal court as being unequivocally literal, the judge would stop counsel mid-sentence and reprimand him. Whole trials have hinged on the interpretation of lines delivered by suspects in taped interviews.

    Your point is that the interpretation of what he said is being widely reported, and I agree with that. What I am saying is that the successful application of innuendo to damage someone’s reputation doesn’t make it indisputable evidence of wrongdoing.

    @Alec,

    I don’t accept that a failure to deny is the same as an admission. If you want to make the point “Cameron didn’t deny it”, say that. It has some power, but is not the same as “Cameron admitted it”.

    The bottom line is, you all believe that Cameron was Murdoch’s bought and paid man, and that he conspired in depth to deliver the bulk of the UK’s media market to his “boss”. If he denies it, you say he is lying. If he is guilty of what you believe, then saying he had no “inappropriate” conversations would be patently untrue. Until or unless some actual proof emerges, he is not in trouble. What is being hoped is that simply repeating the allegation, over and over again, will cause enough PR damage to stop the Tories winning the next election.

  37. @Rob Sheffield
    “EdM needs to get back to the economy, local government finance, the NHS and education ASAP. These are areas of policy where the public are currently- if the polls are to be believed- utterly unconvinced by the Conservative government.”

    I agree with that. For example, news items which have sneaked under the radar this week are the latest revelations on bankers bonuses (i.e. the failure by government to tackle them) and more creeping privatisation of the NHS.

    In case though your comment might be interpreted as carrying an implied tactical criticism of Miliband for actions in the past couple of weeks, any such criticism would IMO be misplaced. Miliband could hardly have focused on anything else since the Milly Dowler revelation brought matters to a head, leading up to today’s (government tabled) emergency debate. It would still have taken the first 10+ minutes of each news bulletin each day. The focus on Cameron has helped dent his reputation and IMO it has the potential to be dented a touch more as the latest fine detail on Cameron’s dealings with News Corp comes out, even if it’s no longer the main focus of public attention. Reputations take time to build and rebuild so that damage will be lasting. Plus the huge bonus of neutering much of Murdoch’s existing influence and seeing off his plan to extend it to BSkyB.

    So so far so good (from a perspective of the left) but nonetheless I agree that it’s time for Miliband to try and move domestic policy issues back into the news, if the opportunity presents itself, while relying on the hacking scandal to rumble on around Cameron for a while yet under the steam of its own momentum.

  38. neil A

    The bottom line is, you all believe that Cameron was Murdoch’s bought and paid man, and that he conspired in depth to deliver the bulk of the UK’s media market to his “boss”

    I don’t think it is ever as straightforward as that. He appears compromised in lots of ways, but I doubt he would actually go as far as “I’ll get you the bid, you back me in your papers.”

    Blair et al were eventually compromised too. Quid pro quo seems harmless on little things but then suddenly you are compromised, and then even if nothing is said, you are lost.

    You know how it works.

  39. As for bodies being buried, one goose maybe… an FT journalist blogged today:

    Ed Miliband appears to have killed it, with one line: “Tom Baldwin’s line manager at the time was the current education secretary.”

    Cameron also started talking about Damian McBride on any number of occasions when his case was weak.

  40. @ Sergio

    Once the inquiries are up and running we are going to see where Labour’s bodies are buried, and there will likewise be no mercy.
    ——————————————–
    LOL :-)

    Everybody within spitting distance of a Labour scandal has written a book, published their diary or has had years to figure out what they’ll say about any ‘bodies’, if they are ever asked.
    8-)

  41. @ Neil

    the bottom line is, you all believe that Cameron was Murdoch’s bought and paid man, and that he conspired in depth to deliver the bulk of the UK’s media market to his “boss.

    =================================

    I dont think that actually.

    I think it shows Cameron’s inexperience and naivety about the dangers of being PM. I think he was oblivious to the risks of appointing Coulson and hob nobbing with the NI ‘family’.
    Maybe he is unfortunate that the whole business has exploded on his watch but that comes with the territory of being PM.

    GB had the global economic crisis to deal with when he was PM.

    “Events dear boy, events”

  42. It’s perfectly clear Miliband can’t make a breakthrough.
    People know they bankrupted the country and did nothing for many years about similar allegations.

    I suspect the government will refocus on sorting out the financial mess they were left, and a brighter period ahead.

  43. @ Aberdeen Cynic (from the last thread)

    “Best of luck with the bar exam.”

    Thank you. I need it. :)

  44. @ Neil A

    “The bottom line is, you all believe that Cameron was Murdoch’s bought and paid man, and that he conspired in depth to deliver the bulk of the UK’s media market to his “boss”.”

    Well I certainly don’t. And you’ve raised a lot of valid points in your posts. Although I do think that some of Cameron’s rhetoric on deficits and debt helps egg on and incite the teabaggers. Well not your rank and file teabagger (knowing who the UK Prime Minister was is beyond the ken of knowledge for most of them) but teabaggers who serve in elected office. But he can’t be blamed for that.

    Speaking of the teabaggers, while in the midst of attempting to send the United States into default for the first time in history and bring about global financial ruin as a result, they’re now threatening to shut down all air traffic in the U.S. on Friday. The House GOP is now holding up funding of the FAA over some pro union provision they don’t like. Shutting down all air traffic would be really great for the economy, not to mention extremely convenient for travelers.

  45. @ Amber Star

    “Everybody within spitting distance of a Labour scandal has written a book, published their diary or has had years to figure out what they’ll say about any ‘bodies’, if they are ever asked.”

    I haven’t finished reading Gordon Brown’s book yet, I’ve had to put it down the past two months. But he doesn’t seem to dwell on scandal. Maybe he will for his next book.

  46. @ Valerie

    I know this is off topic but I wanted to get your opinion as to whether you thought this episode was sexist (in addition to being threatening and entirely inappropriate to begin with).

    http://www.mercurynews.com/news/ci_18515883

    This makes Cameron’s “Calm Down Dear” look like a walk in the park. Of course, this representative is a teabagger.

    This incident reminds me of Anthony’s advice to step back, take a breath, and think before you type.

  47. @ Alec

    “I’ve been quite firm that Cameron has not been in serious trouble (in terms of resigning) over Hackgate, but today’s debate has provided some potentially explosive stuff. Once again, I think Ed has chosen the right battleground.

    It may still all come to nought, but Cameron has admitted he talked to NI people about the Bskyb bid, and Hunt has confirmed this. The battleground is now whether these conversations were appropriate or not.”

    I watched the youtube clip of last week’s PMQs tonight. I did laugh when Cameron said something to the effect of “well when you decide to hire a press secretary who’s a former tabloid news editor, there are some people who might say that’s a really bad idea.” That wa pretty funny.

  48. Good Morning, school hols now!

    43% looks a solid Labour figure. Ed Miliband has been
    established as a leader.

    The questions about Mr Coulson and the Bid will keep returning.

    I think it is more than an Ecclestone moment, as the ramifications are much wider- involving courts and police etc

    Mr Clegg looked very, very uncomfortable in the House, I thought

  49. It might have been a bigger mistake than I thought for DC to align his evidence with Brooks’s.

    Now he has another person who he will have to apologise about if she gets prosecuted successfully. And if it turns out it was he had “appropriate” discussions about the bid with her then he is at her mercy in a way.

    But the story for now is going to be the Euro. Has Osborne made a mistake by opting out of the emergency talks?

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