Tonight’s YouGov poll for the Sun has topline figures of CON 35%, LAB 43%, LDEM 9% – so the eight point lead from yesterday is repeated, suggesting there may genuinely have been an increase in the Labour lead since last week.

Meanwhile Channel 4 News this evening had the first up-to-date polling on the phone hacking affair, an online poll by Survation. 72% of respondents said they did not believe that News International execs were unaware of the hacking, compared to 7% who did. Given a list of people and asked who they considered responsible for the hacking, Rebekah Brooks came top on 66%, followed by Glen Mulcaire on 56% and Murdoch himself on 45%.


485 Responses to “YouGov/Sun – CON 35, LAB 43, LDEM 9”

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  1. The fundamental mistake was to hire an ex-editor of the News of the World as a press agent. It may happen in developing countries, but the UK should know better

  2. @ Colin

    Good post , sorry I missed Greg Dyke on A Cambell, the shear hipocrisy of some on the left has been mind boggling.

  3. @R Huckle

    James Murdoch is currently the chairman of BSkyB, and if Ofcom were to rule that he were an unfit person to hold a licence then he must either be replaced, or BSkyB will lose it’s licence to broadcast.

  4. @Colin – “He is mistaken if he things party advantage can come out of this-any more than it could on MPs expenses.”

    Eh? I recall Cameron moved swiftly and cruxified Brown on expenses, to great effect in polling terms. Much as Milliband is trying to do (successfully so far) to Cameron over NI.

    The problem for Cameron is that Milliband has the jump on him and will now always be viewed as the man who pushed for reforms. As with the expenses, he might only be leading Cameron on this by a matter of hours or days, but in terms of public perception it’s light years.

  5. @ JAYBLANC

    I see. Pure speculation. I can’t see it happening.

    I suppose it depends on what also happens to the Murdoch brands. The shares have not been trading well today and if they lose custom/profitability, then something would have to happen. The cost of the Premier League rights are huge.

  6. “………the biggest concern for shareholders was a statement from Ed Richards of the regulator Ofcom, which said its “fit and proper test” to ensure that media groups adhere to high standards of behaviour, was “an ongoing duty … that is not linked to any particular event, merger or transaction. It’s a generalised duty.” However, he made it clear that there was no question of intervention until police investigations were completed.”

    The Guardian

  7. On a slight tangent:

    BBC: The cost of borrowing for debt-laden Portugal, the Irish Republic and Italy hit new highs on Friday.

    Italy has seen a sharp rise in its 10-year cost of borrowing over the last week, rising from 4.85% to 5.3% – suggesting markets now view the country as almost as risky as recession-hit Spain, which must pay 5.65%.

    Meanwhile Greece, the Republic of Ireland and particularly Portugal have seen the value of their debts in financial markets plummet further.

    Their implied costs of borrowing in markets for three years now stand at 28%, 16.3% and 18.6% respectively.

  8. @ Alec

    You are correct. I doubt that Cameron minds the Ed M has taken the leadership on the current press hacking issue, as if he were opposition leader he would have done exactly the same. Being PM means that you are tied to protocols and have to be very careful what you say.

  9. ALEC

    “Eh? I recall Cameron moved swiftly and cruxified Brown on expenses, to great effect in polling terms. Much as Milliband is trying to do (successfully so far) to Cameron over NI. ”

    Fair enough Alec-go for it Ed :-)

    “The problem for Cameron is that Milliband has the jump on him and will now always be viewed as the man who pushed for reforms. As with the expenses, he might only be leading Cameron on this by a matter of hours or days, but in terms of public perception it’s light years.”

    I understand the point you make & certainly EM will be able to say -he is only doing what I told him to do”, for the reasons you give.

    However my feeling would be that the PM stands or falls in the public mind ,on whether he makes the right moves or not -regardless of the leader of the opposition being a few hours ahead in identifying with such clarity the bleeding obvious which was not apparent to the government he served in only last year.

    I grant you that the latter point won’t last forever-but it still has mileage for a while. Alastair Campbell doesn’t fade from memory that quickly-particularly since he like spouting on TV so much.

  10. Czechman

    The fundamental mistake was to hire an ex-editor of the News of the World as a press agent. It may happen in developing countries, but the UK should know better

    Tories and Labour are as one on this as far as political and press advisers.

    As I wrote before EM has been relatively adult on this and other issues recently, that is until he described DC’s decision to appoint AC as ‘catastrophic’. Floods and earthquakes can be ‘catastrophic’ but hardly an appointment of a political adviser unless , of course he doctors a dodgy dossier, which results in an illegal invasion and the death of our troops as well as thousands of Iraqis. Now that was ‘catastrophic’.

  11. Sergio,
    No, _that_ is only going to help Murdoch in the long term: it will mean they move to selling sports rights on a Europe-wide basis, and only broadcasters that are Europe-wide will be able to afford to bid. :-(

  12. Interestingly, a little over an hour ago, there were two large (100,000 unit each) purchases on News Corp stock, and that appears to have been to stabilise a stock that had been in free-fall until then.

  13. colin

    it’s you who seems to want to make it party political (and Ed M of course, but it’s his job!).

    I don’t think anybody on either side of the house would shed a tear if Murdoch’s power is dramatically reduced. We could get back to arguing over the size of the state.

  14. HENRY

    Excellent post.

  15. BSkyB share price currently down more than 7% on the day. Presumably due to the liklihood of OFCOM deciding that News Corp are not fit to run BSkyB.

  16. jayblanc

    Murdoch buying his own shares?

  17. Nick

    “I don’t think anybody on either side of the house would shed a tear if Murdoch’s power is dramatically reduced”

    Agreed.

  18. Colin

    I grant you that the latter point won’t last forever-but it still has mileage for a while. Alastair Campbell doesn’t fade from memory that quickly-particularly since he like spouting on TV so much.

    I don’t mind seeing Alastair C constantly on BBC programmes. It is the fact that he is usually presented as an impartial observer that surprises me. It is fortunate that BBC believes in balanced reporting as opposed to the rest of the media.

  19. Dictionary definition of ‘catastrophic’ includes…

    involving or causing suffen great damage or suffering

    extremely unfortunate or unsuccessful

    EM’s use seems ok to me.

  20. suffen read sudden

  21. HENRY

    Yes -Sky seems to want him around.

    Adam Boulton v AC was a wonderful thing to see & you can feel the vibes still when they face each other in the studio.

  22. if the attempt (whether successful or otherwise) to delete email records is true, I can’t see how NI can escape prosecution.

    Any legal minds out there? Destroying evidence? Perverting the course of justice?

  23. Compared to some of the comments by Daily Mail readers, I think postings on this site have been mainly sensible, if not entirely neutral.

    I suppose Cameron/Osborne may be relieved that the media is reporting on their own media problems, rather than problems with the UK economy and that of some Euro members. If the UK has to bail out more Euro members either directly or via the IMF, Eurosceptics will not be happy. Cameron/Osborne may not have much choice if Portugal looks like defaulting, as if Spain then follow, we will be in big trouble.

  24. @Nick Poole

    More likely a large fund manager, or a group of fund managers who do not want to see any stock crash like that.

  25. @R Huckle

    I’m not sure how it’s possible to be ‘Neutral’ over an issue like this, ‘fair’ perhaps. It’s not really possible to be ‘Neutral’ over criminal wrong doing, since it would be tactic support…

  26. @ Ben Foley: My assumption is that a pan-EU licence is not going to generate as much money for the FAPL as the current arrangement of packaging rights up in individual territories. It will also result in the highest bidder warehousing rights, rather than sub-licensing local exploitation in other EU member states. So the net result will be that Sky (or whoever) pays for a pan-EU licence but only broadcasts in the UK. NOt only that but the lack of screening of FAPL outside the UK will diminish the standing of the FAPL, therefore the rights to it become less valuable. A downward spiral.

    @ Nick Poole – if a crime has been committed then destroying evidence is perverting the course of justice.

  27. On the TV now a comment “Its been a terrible day for Sky today”. Context? Tour de France. (explanation – team Sky’s hope for a top 3 finish at the end of the tour, Bradley Wiggins has crashed out of the race).

  28. @Mike, Henry
    In ancient Greek, “katastrophe” denotes a sudden and unexpected turn of events. In ancient Greek tragedy, it has the specific meaning of “solution of the plot”, often by means of the revelation of a “tragic” truth, and this is how this initially “neuter” term (a reversal of fortune or a solution of a plot can be either positive or negative) came to signify something very damaging for the tragic hero, i.e. “catastrophic” (in the sense we use the word now – it is interesting to note that in modern Greek it is only this later meaning that prevails, even to exaggeration – even the mildest misfortune is qualified as a “katastrophi” by my half-compatriots!)

  29. Virgilio

    Whilst travelling in greece 25 years ago with my first girlfriend who was 4 or 5 years older than me we holed up for a while at this quiet pension on Karpathos surrounded by gorgeous gardens full of tomatoes and aubergines. The pension was run by a married couple, with the wife again a few years older than the husband. She would cook and he would wait at tables and every night at dinner he would play the hen-pecked husband, laugh and joke with us, point up the difference in age between me and my girlfriend and putting his head in his hands, shout “katastrophi!”

  30. New thread available

  31. Alec

    I recall Cameron moved swiftly and cruxified Brown on expenses,

    ‘Crucified’ the man who ‘saved the world’, that sounds like a ‘catastrophe’…

  32. h ttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGscoaUWW2M

    Seemed strangely apt.

  33. Virgilio

    @Mike, Henry
    In ancient Greek, “katastrophe” denotes a sudden and unexpected turn of events. In ancient Greek tragedy, it has the specific meaning of “solution of the plot”, often by means of the revelation of a “tragic” truth, and this is how this initially “neuter” term (a reversal of fortune or a solution of a plot can be either positive or negative) came to signify something very damaging for the tragic hero, i.e. “catastrophic” (in the sense we use the word now – it is interesting to note that in modern Greek it is only this later meaning that prevails, even to exaggeration – even the mildest misfortune is qualified as a “katastrophi” by my half-compatriots!)

    Just read your post. Thanks very informative.

  34. @Steve -“On a slight tangent:

    BBC: The cost of borrowing for debt-laden Portugal, the Irish Republic and Italy hit new highs on Friday.”

    You’re way behind – I posted that ages ago.

    No one beats me in the Race of Doom.

  35. Does anyone seriously believe that Cameron wasn’t fully aware of the allegations, and simply didn’t care (or Murdoch told him not to care)? Isn’t it a strong possibility that Coulson was appointed to be Murdoch’s man in No10? And that Coulson was in the Tory press office before the election to provide a direct line for the Tories to make use of information from phone hacks of Prescott and other Labour MPs?

    Yes, this might be a partial view. But is the above an implausible scenario?

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