The full tables for the YouGov/Sunday Times poll are up here. Aside from the normal trackers questions in this week’s poll largely cover representation of women in politics and educational issues.

The Conservative apparently think they are struggling amongst women and there is some truth to this. Prior to Christmas the regular YouGov polls were showing the Conservatives still leading amongst women while they fell behind amongst men – this year Labour have more usually lead amongst both groups – certainly it looks at first glance as though the Tory advantage amongst women is fading. The graph below shows a two week rolling average of the Tory lead amongst men & women in the weekly YouGov/Sunday Times poll.

YouGov asked about perceptions of which party best represented various groups – most followed the pattern you’d expect – the Conservatives were seen as better representing middle class people and the rich, Labour were seen as better representing the poorest, immigrants, trade unionists, pensioners, etc. For our purposes here though we were really interested in who people perceived as being closer to women – 26% think Labour is closest to women and better understands their views compared to 13% for the Conservatives… but 26% say none of the parties do and 23% don’t know (it is even more pronounced amongst women voters, 32% of whom say none of the parties understand and reflect women’s views).

The reasons for the difference are hard to pin down – other questions in this poll showed that Labour were seen as having more women in senior roles, but it’s hard to say how much difference that actally makes. In terms of actually policy there is normally little difference between men and women policy. Women normally say they are concerned at pretty much the same issues as men (the idea that women care about “soft” issues like education and health and men care about “hard” issues like defence, crime and the economy is basically nonsense), and on most policy questions there is little difference between the genders – I’ve commented about this before, specifically in regard of attitudes toward nuclear power and energy and regulating pornography, which are unusual as being issues where there is a large gender difference.

In this poll YouGov asked a quick bank of policy questions looking for gender difference. In ending child benefit for families with top rate tax payers and criticising men who abandon their children – both issues where one could reasonably have expected to find contrasting attitudes between men and women there was no significant difference. Two policy areas that did have significant differences between women and men were tightening restrictions on sexualised music videos and adverts broadcast when children might see them and equalising the pension age at 66 by 2020.

Moving onto education, 24% of people think the government have the right polices, compared to 47% who think they have the wrong policies. There is also a perception that levels of teaching are worse than 10 years ago, and a very widespread perception that behaviour is worse (this, of course, is not a sign that education standards are actually falling – cf. perceptions of crime)

On schools, 42% of people think central government has too much power over schools, 27% think local councils have too much power, 28% that teaching unions do. In contrast 38% think parents do not have enough power over schools and 41% think headteachers do not have enough power. Despite this people are almost evenly split over support for academy schools – 36% support them, 36% oppose them. For “Free schools” the split is 34% support, 40% oppose.

Finally on the teachers’ strike, 38% said they supported industrial action by teachers, with 49% opposing it. There have been various polls asking support or opposition to the teachers’ strike over the last week or so – I will try to do a round up post covering them all later on tonight.


147 Responses to “YouGov on the “women’s vote” and education”

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  1. Interesting. While men gradually shifted to Labour, it looks like the Tory women’s vote went off a cliff early in the new year. Was there some particular issue to the fore at that time, or was there more of a ‘last straw’ effect?

    More importantly, was this a one-off effect, or would there be a further shift if the same policy issues came back into the spotlight? If the critical issues could be identified, that could be dynamite for Labour.

  2. The female vote was absolutely central to the shock SNP landslide in May. Traditionally the SNP have struggled to win over womens’ votes, despite having lots of prominent female politicians, from Winnie Ewing’s seminal Hamilton victory in 1967 onwards.

    Quite why women have finally been won over is still a bit of a mystery, at least to me. It is probably more that Labour lost their confidence rather than the SNP actively winning them over.

    I was reading the UKPR thread yesterday when Barney Crockett reported the result of that Aberdeen by-election. Thank you. It made my day! I am on a break from politics, so have not been monitoring the news, so this was a very pleasant surprise. A great result for Labour too by the way. Scotland is rapidly moving to a de facto 2-party system: SNP v LAB.

    I note that on the back of that stunning gain from a poor 3rd-place, we have this story:

    ‘Council leader to step down after SNP victory at crucial by-election’
    – Vote paves way for SNP group leader Callum McCaig to become youngest council leader in the UK.

    http://news.stv.tv/scotland/north/260001-council-leader-to-step-down-after-snp-victory-at-crucial-by-election/

    McCaig is just 26.

  3. From today’s Sunday Times (behind the paywall):

    … Louisa MacDonald is typical of the women who have turned away from the Tories. She can’t give her real name, because she works for the Department for Work and Pensions and would be sacked. And she certainly can’t afford to lose her job right now.

    … Charlotte Vere, a Conservative candidate in last year’s election, thinks the Tories still have a blind spot when it comes to how their policies are perceived by female voters.

    … Anna Soubry, the MP for Broxtowe, said: “Quite a few of us are concerned about the drop in support from women and have been talking to each other about it.”

    Another female Tory MP thinks Cameron himself often strikes the wrong tone. She winced over his “calm down, dear” put-down to the Labour MP Angela Eagle during prime minister’s questions two months ago.

    “No10 is worried about this issue and rightly so,” said the female Tory MP. “The problem with the women’s vote is largely a question of tone and the Cameron-Obama barbecue [at Downing Street] last month is an example. The whole concept of the men flipping burgers while the women served the coleslaw salad was like something out of the 1950s.”

    … Women have been the Conservative party’s secret weapon for decades. There is no election that the Tories have won where women have not voted disproportionately for the blue candidate.

    It is estimated that had women not voted, Labour would have been in power continuously since 1945. That is why Tony Blair put so much effort into winning female support.

    … Elizabeth Truss, the Tory MP for South West Norfolk, believes the solution lies in smarter women-friendly policies…

    http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/news/Politics/article656716.ece

  4. Anthony

    There’s a problem with the Child Benefit question that means it pretty meaningless. The question is:

    Below are some things that the government have said or done in recent months, in each case please say if you support or oppose the measure […]Stopping child benefit for families with a top-rate taxpayer

    But this will actually affect higher taxpayers* (40%) and opposed to top-rate (50%). There was much greater opposition when it was announced, so I suspect there is confusion here over who is being targeted and this will affect response (though probably not between men and women.

    * Yes I know it’s much more complicated than that. Indeed the anomalies and problems with implementation raised opposition again when they were explained.

  5. Very strange news from Glastonbury – Cameron’s constituency association chairman has been found dead, police reported as treating it as a crime scene.

    Unpleasant for all concerned, but it shows you what a farce Glastonbury has become when Tory party chiefs attend what used to be a counter culture protest event.

  6. I’m not sure if there is any direct connection between Tory struggles with women voters and this; h ttp://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2008199/The-cruel-hounding-Mark-Pritchard-shows-Tories-failed-clean-politics.html

    I’m always a little hesitant about ‘anonymous MP says…’ stuff, but this clearly seems to have the ring of truth. The linkage with turning off female voters, if there is one, could be the charge or arrogance.

    What is undeniable, as some of us pointed out well before the election, is that Cameron is very cliquey and not popular within large parts of his party. There are always divisions within big political parties, but the evidence suggests that Cameron hasn’t done enough to build himself a solid base of core support amongst MPs.

    His actions, before and after gaining power, turned away a lot of potential friends, and now I see him at risk if wider politcal events start to run against him.

    This is similar to the wider electorate, and women in particular. Cameron was never liked by most voters – tolerated, perhaps, but not really liked. I can imagine his personal ratings tumbling fast if things turn against the government as there just isn’t that reservoir of high level personal support for him.

  7. Reuters: ‘Conservative Party member found dead at Glastonbury’

    http://uk.reuters.com/article/2011/06/26/uk-glastonbury-death-idUKTRE75P0L220110626

  8. Having a woman Education Secretary might help. Put Justine Greening there.

  9. Copied from last polling thread. Not wishing to get involved in theories about this. But any connection? Leave this to the coroners.

    I see that the consituency chairman of Camerons local constituency party is quoted on Sky as being the person found dead at Glastonbury. He had only today been quoted in the Daily Mail, discussing party membership.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2008127/JAMES-FORSYTH-Theres-reason-join-Tories-Weve-come-voracious-crass–Who-says-Daves-constituency-chairman.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

  10. What on earth is going on there?

    Chairman of DC’s constituency party writes a scathing attack on the state of the party and then is found dead in a temporary toilet at Glastonbury festival within earshot of Coldplay, U2 and it seems wane rooney and missis.

    Blimey.

    This looks like an extraordinary mess.

  11. It’s a seething cauldron down there among Cameron’s blues:

    http://www.chippingnorton.net/NEWS/GREENWELLRESIGNS.htm

  12. @ Nick Poole

    I can see there being speculation that pressure had been put on him about the article, but I find this distasteful. I will leave that to the media, but it is not going to be easy for Cameron, on the back of Mark Pritchards allegations about being bullied.

  13. It’s going to lead to a lot of talk, yes, about stuff that hasn’t been wisely aired yet. Bullying and control-freakery and Whip coercion and paruchuted in candidates and all the stuff aired about previously about Blair and Brown and Mandelson.

    If it’s distasteful I seem to remember a lot of finger pointing about Dr David Kelly’s suicide too, and that wasn’t stopped on the grounds of bad taste.

    The point is, this might lead to a spotlight upon the side of Cameron that he least wants shown. And then we might see some poll effects, indeed.

  14. Far too early to speculate.

  15. Not sure that this is as simple as it appears (not that it’s actually simple) because we have to remember another group the Conservatives rely on heavily, namely the over 65s. Now it is clear that women increasingly outnumber men as the age goes beyond 65, it could be that the higher support from women could be because there are more older ones, who would be inclined to support the Conservatives regardless of their gender. or has age been weighted out somehow?

  16. There will certainly be calls for an independent inquiry, even before there’s a coroner’s inquiry.

  17. Jeepers, I’m just catching up on about 3 weeks of political news. This story will certainly boost the ‘Yes’ campaign during its formative stage:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-13830657

    … and this article by a former Lib Dem by-election candidate (Govan) is well worth a read for those interested in the future of the Labour Party, and the possible continuation of the Union:

    http://news.stv.tv/politics/259806-preventing-the-slow-death-of-scottish-labour/

  18. @ Robin

    Was there some particular issue to the fore at that time, or was there more of a ‘last straw’ effect?
    ———————————————–
    It’s the economy.

    Women want the deficit gone, the meme about leaving debts for our children to pay struck a chord with women; they were also told (if Yvette Cooper is to be believed) that women will be disproportionately affected by the cuts. It was interesting that women seemed to accept that they’d need to take more of the Coalition medecine, if they wanted the country back on its feet.

    Then, in January, the economy was down & borrowing was up. Women decided the government weren’t keeping their side of the bargain: VAT went up, inflation was rising & negative GDP was reported.

    By the way, I believe Ed Balls saying VAT should be cut to help the economy was a policy aimed at women; IMO, he will be very aware of the change in Women’s VI from around the time VAT was raised. He was looking to lock it in for Labour.
    8-)

  19. Wolf

    “Having a woman Education Secretary might help. Put Justine Greening there”

    Good God no.

    a) Greening is damn good where she is.

    b) Gove is way out front as a standard bearer for PS reform. None of the others are anywhere near as advanced as he is. Teaching standards next I see.
    Education is the foundation of the future economic performance of UK.

    I found the YouGov numbers on the education questions odd :-

    Too much ( +) / not enough ( -) power ?
    Local councils +16
    Teaching unions +11
    Parents -25
    Head teachers -33

    Teaching standarrds better ( + ) / worse ( -) than 10 yrs ago ?. -32

    Pupils behaviour-ditto. -70

    Coalition policies right ( + ) / wrong ( – ) -23

    All those answers would have been Gove’s answers……..except the last one.

    There is something lacking in this Government’s explanation of it’s policies .

    They could start their defence of the PS Pension reforms with the revelation in the ST today of the employers contributions to the striking union leaders’ pensions :_

    Prentis ( Unison)- 26% of salary
    Serwotka ( PCS)-30% of salary ( his contribution-3%)
    Blower ( NUT)-28% of salary
    Barber ( TUC)-25% of salary ( his contribution-6%)

    This is a gift for the explanation of the cost of a final salary linked/ indexed pension , to the employer-ie all taxpayers.

  20. @ ALEC

    “but it shows you what a farce Glastonbury has become when Tory party chiefs attend what used to be a counter culture protest event”

    What an extraordinary thing to say.

    It’s a music festival-not a Left wing revival meeting-anyone can go !

    ………..anyway there was a “protest”…….ArtUncut protested that U2 don’t pay their taxes :-) :-)

  21. Wasn’t politics always a little muddy?.

  22. @NICK POOLE
    Did you become so animated when David Kelly’s body was found ?

  23. Those aged 60+ in the Sunday Times poll answered as follows to the question:
    “Please say which political party is closest to [elderly people] and best understands and reflects their views]”
    Labour 29%
    Con 16%
    LD 5%
    None of them 39%
    DK 10%

    which is rather strange given that exactly the same 60+ subsample* then goes on to confirm its usual solid Con voting intention i.e:
    Con 43%
    Lab 37%
    LD 7%
    Other 12%

    Is the former result a YouGov typo? If not, it seems extraordinary. Very few 60+ (i.e. elderly in my book) people think that the Conservative Party is closest to them and best understands and reflects their views. And yet they’re the most solid Conservatives of any age group!

    (*OK, I know its a sub-sample but this one seems pretty close to the average of the ones we see week after week)

  24. Alec

    Are you surprised that Glastonbury has changed or that the Tory party has changed by a party chairman attending this “counter-culture” festival?

    8)

  25. chouenlai

    Animated?

    Yes I was interested in Dr Kelly’s death. That whole sexed up dossier and Alistair Campbell’s unconvincing righteous anger were disgraceful New Labour antics, in my opinion.

    I don’t treat death lightly. But nor will I shed crocodile tears when I don’t know any of the people concerned.

  26. @ Colin

    They could start their defence of the PS Pension reforms with the revelation in the ST today of the employers contributions to the striking union leaders’ pensions :_

    Prentis ( Unison)- 26% of salary
    Serwotka ( PCS)-30% of salary ( his contribution-3%)
    Blower ( NUT)-28% of salary
    Barber ( TUC)-25% of salary ( his contribution-6%)

    This is a gift for the explanation of the cost of a final salary linked/ indexed pension , to the employer-ie all taxpayers.
    —————————————————–
    I really do hope that the Tory PR machine takes your suggested approach… Our response: Unions, from small membership contributions, can pay decent pensions – why can’t one of the biggest per capita economies in the world do the same?
    8-)

  27. @Colin
    “I found the YouGov numbers on the education questions odd :-

    Too much ( +) / not enough ( -) power ?
    Local councils +16
    Teaching unions +11
    Parents -25
    Head teachers -33”

    I didn’t, because of the one response from the above set of questions that you chose to omit:
    Too much ( +) / not enough ( -) power ?
    Central government +38

  28. @NICK POOLE
    I have just read the latest BBC news and the police are still trying to ascertain how the unfortunate man died.
    David Cameron’s reaction is one of utter grief. Your nasty, “I hope there is a scandal that ruins Cameron” reaction was a disgrace on this site. Other more sensible anti Tories simply said it’s to early to speculate.

  29. @ Phil

    “Please say which political party is closest to [elderly people] and best understands and reflects their views]”

    None of them 39%
    —————————————————
    That 39% appears to be the answer to your question as to why voting intention swings in favour of the Tories despite Labour leading in amongst those who do pick a Party.

    None of the Parties reflect my views but:
    The Tories are a little bit closer than Labour; or
    I’ve always voted Tory & Labour haven’t given me a good enough reason to vote for them; or
    I trust the Tories more on the economy, despite them not reflecting my views in general.. etc.

    But that 39% shows there is the possibility of older people changing the voting habits of a lifetime, if the non-Tory Parties can tap into the views of older people.
    8-)

  30. The Christopher Shale death got me googling. There seems to very little on-line detail I could find about his company ‘Oxford Resources Ltd’ or indeed his previous one ‘sgl communications’, though no doubt better researchers will find something. There are US and canadian companies with those names, but I don’t think they’re connected.

    The reason I was curious was that Oxford Resources was described as “a corporate cost-reduction company based in Chipping Norton” and in the only substantial article I could find in the Independent from 1994,* he went on about the savings that could be made. I wondered if this sort of rhetoric had an effect on how the Tory Party regarded the sort of savings that could be made.

    The reality may be somewhat different. <a href="http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/jun/24/bad-science-local-goverment-savings-ben-goldacre&quot; Ben Goldacre's Bad Science column this week deconstructs a press release from the DCLG claiming that 20% savings that could be made. The 'report' the PR is based on, turns out to be a promotional brochure from a similar 'cost reduction' company and not even justified by the info in that. If, once again, we're in a situation where the government are believing their own PR, then they are going to get a shock when reality bites.

    Meanwhile the Shale death will no doubt be already getting the conspiracy theorists into gear, not helped by the usual fug of too-hastily reported information. For example it is being said that Michael Eavis said at a press conference that the police told him it was a suicide case (it strikes me as unlikely they would say anything definite at this stage).

    Also the 'controversial' report seems fairly common sense to me, especially considering the decline of the Conservatives from millions of members to 177,000 today. The decline of all the major UK Parties has had an effect on British politics that is almost shrugged off by those in them, but which has been devastating for the country.

  31. @ Chouenlai

    David Cameron’s reaction is one of utter grief. Your nasty, “I hope there is a scandal that ruins Cameron” reaction was a disgrace on this site.
    —————————————————
    You are new to the site, aren’t you? If Nick Poole had said the above which you attribute to him, I think Anthony would have moderated the post. IMO, You are mis-characterizing what Nick P actually said.
    8-)

  32. Revised version of previous comment because my formatting is going to pot. And I left a hanging bracket in the comment before that.

    The Christopher Shale death got me googling. There seems to very little on-line detail I could find about his company ‘Oxford Resources Ltd’ or indeed his previous one ‘sgl communications’, though no doubt better researchers will find something. There are US and Canadian companies with those names, but I don’t think they’re connected.

    The reason I was curious was that Oxford Resources was described as “a corporate cost-reduction company based in Chipping Norton” and in the only substantial article I could find in the Independent from 1994,* he went on about the savings that could be made. I wondered if this sort of rhetoric had an effect on how the Tory Party regarded the sort of savings that could be made.

    The reality may be somewhat different. Ben Goldacre’s Bad Science column this week deconstructs a press release from the DCLG claiming that 20% savings that could be made. The ‘report’ the PR is based on, turns out to be a promotional brochure from a similar ‘cost reduction’ company and not even justified by the info in that. If, once again, we’re in a situation where the government are believing their own PR, then they are going to get a shock when reality bites.

    Meanwhile the Shale death will no doubt be already getting the conspiracy theorists into gear, not helped by the usual fug of too-hastily reported information. For example it is being said that Michael Eavis said at a press conference that the police told him it was a suicide case (it strikes me as unlikely they would say anything definite at this stage).

    Also the ‘controversial’ report seems fairly common sense to me, especially considering the decline of the Conservatives from millions of members to 177,000 today. The decline of all the major UK Parties has had an effect on British politics that is almost shrugged off by those in them, but which has been devastating for the country.

    * Of course if Anthony let us put more than one link per comment, I could direct you to that too.

  33. @AMBER STAR
    I have seen your comments on this site and in the Guardian. With a note of your intelligence, I am very surprised at your 5.21 reply to Colin. Which companies had you in mind, when you recommended they pay 30% of salary into an employees pension scheme? Average salary £24,000, 30% = £7200 PA, X 428 workers,= a bit over 3million quid per annum on the wage bill.
    I bet your not a finance director are you.

  34. chouenlai

    I’m sure I’m a very bad man and you are a saint.

  35. @Amber Star
    “But that 39% shows there is the possibility of older people changing the voting habits of a lifetime, if the non-Tory Parties can tap into the views of older people.”

    Aye.

  36. @AMBER STAR

    “The point is, this might lead to a spotlight upon the side of Cameron that he least wants shown. And then we might see some poll effects, indeed”.

    This is the comment. We have no idea why this fellow has expired as yet, he was in his 50’s, it may have been a heart attack or stroke. Do you genuinely think that it is in very good taste for some Tory hater to make this kind of comment? And as you say yourself , on this site.

  37. Colin

    What an extraordinary thing to say.

    [Glastonbury]’s a music festival-not a Left wing revival meeting-anyone can go !

    Well yes and no. According to the Guardian:

    Geoff Martin, who runs the Left Field area that hosts political seminars and speeches – this year by the likes of Bob Crow, Caroline Lucas and Tony Benn – said revellers were still cognisant of Glastonbury’s political meaning, and opposition to the government’s austerity cuts had already become a theme of Glastonbury 2011.

    Mind you the event was always fairly posh. Didn’t Churchill’s granddaughter run the non-music performance side of it for decades?

    ………..anyway there was a “protest”…….ArtUncut protested that U2 don’t pay their taxes

    Alas according to the Guardian:

    Art Uncut planned to disrupt the performance in protest at the band’s 2006 decision to move their tax affairs from Ireland to the Netherlands, and rumours spread of siege towers and stage invasions.

    But the protest group’s efforts, if visible, were short-lived. Two rings of 30 protesters locked arms for half an hour to allow the inflating of a 30ft-tall inflatable balloon inscribed with the words “you pay tax too”, before security swarmed in and, after a short, violent scuffle, tore the inflatable down. The protesters scattered, their places eagerly taken by oblivious U2 fans

    :( :(

  38. @Chouenlai

    “This is the comment.”

    And a very reasonable and insightful one it was.

    A senior figure in DC’s local party has died, in a manner yet to be determined. On the same day, a story was published based on something he wrote, about the nature of the current Tory party. It’s inevitable that his death (and its unusual circumstance) will mean that article will get more attention than it otherwise would. And other articles in a similar vein (e.g. the one about bullying of backbenchers and the unpleasant nature of some of the new intake of Tory MPs) may also get extra attention as a side effect.

    All perfectly reasonable comment. What’s your issue?

  39. @Robin

    I think the point being made is that people have lost a husband, father and a friend only a matter of hours ago.

    But I agree there is bound to be speculation and more attention will be focused on the tensions in the Conservative party.

    I just hope that once the investigations are conducted, that Mr Shale was not found to have been subjected to any form of pressure, about an article that could be applied to all the parties i.e reducing membership.

  40. @nick poole
    If the Acme Plastic Bucket and Commode Co, wish to pay a PR man/woman £150,000 PA, it comes out of their profits. 99 times out of 100, if they don’t get value, they don’t do it again. If the London Borough of Walford, employ’s a Parks & Gardens Transgender , Gay & Lesbian support Officer, @ £40,000 PA, plus car allowance, plus final salary pension, total about £75,000 PA. The bill is footed by the council / income tax payer. That difference is what it is all about.

  41. I may be new to this board, but I have read its posts for some time. It seems to me, that certain posters are so committed to their cause, that all decency and fair play disappears. This is disappointing on a site such as this.

  42. @chouenlai

    I have some sympathy with the view that we should not explore tragic deaths for party political effect – but I think we doneed to be cognisant of the polling effects of such events – usually far less than initial estimates would suggest.

    I do think the comments re- Glastonbury having a winnebago section and being mainstream and essentially pointless now as a symbol of anything other than commercial music are valid observations.

    I was last there in 1986 – the entrance money went to CND and the sight became a refuge for travellers being systematically hounded from place to place by every police force in the south west. They were treated as heroes by all inside the sight.

    It cost me 17 quid as I recall and I got to see Maradona’s goals in the back of a van with some guys from the Black Theatre of Brent – who celebrated, along with me, England’s demise.
    Changed days indeed!

  43. @iceman
    Thank you for your first paragraph, I agree entirely with it.

  44. I’m not sure you nanny example is apposite but I AM sure that, much as I’d like to, explaining my views on public service and privatisation outside a polling context would get AW’s ire up, if I haven’t already.

    So I’ll decline.

  45. Chouenlai – “I may be new to this board, but I have read its posts for some time.”

    Have you, perchance, posted using any other names?

  46. @ AMBER

    “I really do hope that the Tory PR machine takes your suggested approach… Our response: Unions, from small membership contributions, can pay decent pensions – why can’t one of the biggest per capita economies in the world do the same?”

    I’m very surprised at this Amber.

    You know as well as I that no company in the Private Sector can afford a 25%/30% oncost to payroll-on top of E’ee NI. DB schemes -when they existed saw employer contributions of one half to one third of those figures.

    THat is exactly why these DB schemes have been abandoned for DC schemes.

    THat any other left leaning commentator should propose that all Private Sector payroll costs are forthwith raised by 30% would not surprise me.

    That you do-with your background does surprise me.

    I repeat-this is an open goal for explaining why those individuals are leading their members on strike-and for demonstrating that the cost to taxpayers has to be contained .

    I hope too that someone-somewhere explains that a Pensionable Salary based on Average Pay rather than Final Pay can enhance pensions for the lower paid……and is still a Defined Benefit Scheme…………..and is still index ed………..and is still unobtainable in the Private Sector.

  47. @Roger Mexico – “Didn’t Churchill’s granddaughter run the non-music performance side of it for decades?”

    She was suggested as a spouse for Prince Charles and Crown Prince Carl Gustaf, but spectacularly dropped out, becoming involved in anti-Vietnam protest and with making Glastonbury what it was in the early 70’s, ie genuinely counter-cultural.

    I don’t think she could be accused of dipping a foot (or designer welly) in the alternative scene, rather she went the whole hog and severed her connection with the bon ton.

  48. See what you’ve done? I’m back in moderation hell.

    i went to Glastonbury in 190 and watched England beat Egypt 1-0 (on a fuzzy portable in a tent) to top their World Cup group and march on towards that fateful date with the Germans.

    Missed the headline act (the Cure I believe) but I did see Mana Negra perform Puta Fever which was the highlight for me and a sight better thean the insipid Hothouse Flowers that followed.

  49. PHIL

    “I didn’t, because of the one response from the above set of questions that you chose to omit:
    Too much ( +) / not enough ( -) power ?
    Central government +38”

    THanks.

    I made the mistake of quoting from the Sunday Times-have now looked at the YG tabs & am even more confused :-

    “Majority” opinions :-

    About the right amount of power :-

    LAs , Teaching Unions.

    Too much power :-

    Central Government.

    Not enough power:-

    Parents & Teachers.

    Standards of teaching &discipline -Worse.

    …………It’s a mixed bag isn’t it ? :-)

    I think its like so much of the government PS reform programme-it is not understood -and won’t be till it’s in place & the effects are coming through.

    Then people will say-this is better…..or this is worse.

    The Government needs to press on with it & not get waylaid by opinion polls :-)

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