YouGov’s first daily poll since the budget has topline figures of CON 37%, LAB 41%, LDEM 11%, Others 11%. The day-on-day changes since yesterday are not significant, but it is the smallest Labour lead since February. Government approval has also risen – today’s figure is minus 19, the highest since January (33% approve and 52% disapprove).

This suggests there may be a slight boost from the budget, but I wouldn’t get to excited. As we saw in the previous post, the previous budget in June gave the government a boost of a couple of points, and it lasted all of a week.

Naturally there were some more questions on the details of the budget which will be up in the Sun later or on the YouGov website tomorrow.


55 Responses to “YouGov/Sun – CON 37, LAB 41, LDEM 11”

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  1. @ Neil A

    By all means support SoCaL’s remark about Charles Manson. I believe it puts into question who is rational about this & who is being emotional.

    It’s quite amusing, given the context, that you think I am irrational about Libya. About 40% would agree with you; & 40% would agree with me.

    Everything I say is under-pinned by international law or the fact that not everybody in the UK is gung-ho about this intervention (i.e. many people believe that it should remain firmly within the terms of UNSC Res 1973).

    I do not think that Anthony objects to this subject being discussed, provided it is polite. I do not believe I was impolite to SoCaL & I was challenging something that I considered inappropriate to this site/ subject/ debate. There was not intention to cause offence.

    Nor did I intend to be partisan. But I concede, I would not be dismayed, were Anthony to remove the 11:06 am comment.
    8-)

  2. Amber,

    I don’t know about you but this whole Libya thing has opened by eyes… The usual suspects will always support- that is a given.

    But the messianic importation/promulgation of democracy like it is some sort of panecea tells me how little we have learned from Iraq..

    Since the Eygpt revolt, there have been women arrested and subjected to virginity tests, and there has a been a ban on peaceful protests.. One woman who ‘failed’ the viriginity tests actually was electrocuted..

    Benghazi has a long history of Islamic fundamentalism.. I fear the same would happen there..

  3. @ Craig

    “The problem is we’re at – yet again – a situation where there’s no opposition to a war. There’s no viable party to turn to. You might be happy with a consensus in your country, but it’s nowhere near public opinion and isn’t good for democracy or Labour’s prospects at winning back their anti-war vote.”

    Here’s a question though, were those opposed to the Iraq War opposed to the war because they oppose all wars at all times? Or were those who opposed the Iraq War opposed because it was the wrong war at the wrong time for the wrong reasons? There’s a critical difference I think.

    Also, are all those opposed to the war on the left? Aren’t there many on the right who question intervention without any immediate benefit and with massive costs at a time of already large budget deficits?

    @ Amber

    “Public opinion IS divided about the Libya intervention. And sending war planes & boats to bomb a country which we are not at war with, is by no means a nit picking, little thing. It is a huge thing.”

    They’ve already made the decision that they support the war though. Should they base their decisions on what they believe to be right course of action given the facts on the ground or should they simply base their decisions on public opinion? It’s a difficult question to answer because while you would typically hear the argument that politicians should ignore public opinion and just make the “right decision”, politicians are ultiamately accountable to the public and are supposed to be representing what the public wants. So perhaps their should be a more critical voice. But I don’t think that it is beneficial for politicians to offer a critical voice just for the sake of having a critical voice.

    “There’s a lot of things in this world that need fixing. And making ill informed, inflamatory comments about one of them seems out of character from you.”

    I am sorry if you feel this way. It was not intended to be inflammatory.

  4. @ SoCaL

    I am sorry if you feel this way. It was not intended to be inflammatory.
    —————————————–
    Then I apologise for taking ‘offence’ about something that was intended to be ‘poetic licence’ rather than analogy.
    8-)

  5. @ Eoin

    “But the messianic importation/promulgation of democracy like it is some sort of panecea tells me how little we have learned from Iraq..

    Since the Eygpt revolt, there have been women arrested and subjected to virginity tests, and there has a been a ban on peaceful protests.. One woman who ‘failed’ the viriginity tests actually was electrocuted..

    Benghazi has a long history of Islamic fundamentalism.. I fear the same would happen there.”

    Democracy is not perfect and getting to democracy is often a messy and complicated process. But the Egyptyian people have to be given the opportunity to figure it out on their own.

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