A little later than I intended, here’s a round up of other findings in the YouGov/Sunday Times poll, full tables for which are now available here.

Firstly there were a group of questions on local government cuts – 48% thinks cuts to council services are necessary in the context of the government’s deficit, 31% do not. People are pretty evenly split on whether they blame the government or local councils for cuts to local services – 27% blame the councils themselves for not tackling waste, 29% the government for cutting their funding, 37% think blame should be shared equally between them.

On local government cuts, 48% think the cuts to local council services are necessary to reduce the deficit, and are quite evenly split about where the blame for individual cuts should lie. 27% think the blame for the cuts should mainly fall upon local councils for not cutting their waste, 29% the government for cutting their funding and 37% that they are equally to blame. There was some sympathy for arguments that councils are cutting voluntary grants because it’s easier than sacking staff, that councils countrolled by opposition parties are deliberiately slashing sensitive services for political reasons and that councils are exaggerating their funding cuts, but in all cases it is hardly overwhelmingly, with less than half agreeing.

There were some questions on the big society that largely echo the YouGov/Sun polling on the Big Society a fortnight or so ago. The majority of people aren’t sure what the Big Society actually is, though having has it explained to them a plurality of them think is a good idea in principle (in the Sun poll a fortnight ago YouGov also asked if people thought it would work in practice – a large majority thought it would not).

Asked if they themselves would be interested in volunteering 17% of people claim they already too some sort of volunteer work in their community, with a further 10% saying they would be interested in doing so if given the opportunity. 28% say they do not have the time and 30% that they would not be interested. Note well, however, that this sort of question is probably subject to social desirability bias – people will tend to exaggerate how helpful and community spirited they are themselves (my favourite example of this that I often quote was a Populus poll that asked people how much money they personally had given to the Tsunami appeal – if everyone who answered the poll had been telling the truth the public would have donated far, far, far in excess of the amount the appeal actually received).

There were also some questions on Human Rights and the European Court which displayed a typically hostile reaction. 63% think it is wrong for the ECHR to be able to make rulings over the British courts and 57% think that our membership of the ECHR is, on balance, a bad thing. Asked what their preferred option would be, 24% think we should remain a member of the ECHR, 55% would like to see Britain withdraw and instead adopt our own Bill of Rights, 4% would prefer Britain did not have any sort of Bill of Rights.

On the specific case of prisoners having the right to vote, 69% think no prisoners should be able to vote, 20% that only prisoners serving short sentences should be able to vote and 6% think all prisoners should be able to vote. If the government were ordered to pay compensation to prisoners denied the vote, 61% think the government should refuse to do so, just 9% that “The government needs to obey the law, and should pay compensation if ordered to.”


117 Responses to “More from the YouGov/Sunday Times poll”

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  1. @ Eoin

    Happy Valentine’s Day to you as well (I’m so glad it’s on a Monday this year…makes the day less romantic). I didn’t realize it was an international holiday.

  2. SoCal,

    Only makes it less romantic if you let it! Go take a walk, you never know who you might bump into :) :) :) Happy Val’s

  3. @ Anthony

    I suspect exposure to the horror of war has the opposite effect in terms of later alcohol and drug abuse.
    ————————————————–
    I agree, which is why I said overt drug & alcohol problems. Binge drinking, clubbing & ‘something for the weekend’ drug/ crime problems are overt; the PTSD problems tend to be hidden by the sufferer therefore more damaging to the individual &/or his immediate family but less of an obvious problem for society.

  4. @ Amber Star

    ““Hottest” seems to be stretching it a bit; they are politicians afterall. Attractive might be a better word.”

    I think politicians can be hot. Or they can be attractive. Rahm Emmanuel once explained that you don’t want to be too good looking when you run for office or you might not get taken seriously.

    “I notice Jim Murphy also made the list.”

    Yeah, I’m glad about that. He’s hot. As former Assemblywoman Bonnie Garcia (R-Cathedral City) would say “I wouldn’t kick him out of my bed. Mmmhmm.” Btw, do you think he dyes his hair?

  5. @ Eoin

    “Only makes it less romantic if you let it! Go take a walk, you never know who you might bump into Happy Val’s”

    That’s very sweet of you to say. :)

  6. @ Eoin

    Btw, I mentioned this the other day. But my favorite Scots-Irish American Senator, Jim Webb, is retiring from the Senate. Very sad to me. Oh well, he did more than his service for the country.

  7. Jon Craig has tweeted (from the No 10 briefing) that the government will try to reverse all their defeats on the AV Bill when it returns to the Commons.

  8. @ Anthony Wells

    It’s too bad you guys don’t have reconcilation.

  9. Anthony

    Thanks for the info re the Legislation (Territorial Extent) Bill.

    I read the Hansard Report with some interest. I had hoped that there might be some indication of when the UK Govt planned to fulfil their pledge to “address the West Lothian Question”.

    From what I could understand from the Minister’s Response, they were still trying to find out West Lothian’s postcode.

  10. AMBER STAR
    Let’s have another war, in which millions of young men die & some parts of our towns & cities are razed to the ground. I think it’s a fairly safe bet that in the following decade there’ll be less crime & unemployment; probably fewer overt drug & alcohol problems too.

    I heard a lot of weak excuses from politicians for their failure but this takes the biscuit. A pity you cannot enter into a sensible debate. Really rather nasty.

  11. Amber Star

    I obviously hit a raw nerve. Both my dad and only uncle were killed in WW2. I do not think either of them would have taken to drugs or become alcoholics, any more than many of the others who gave their lives, as you imply.

    In fact the war, which was inevitable given the threat of Hitler, placed a heavy burden on this and other European countries who lost so many decent people at a young age.

  12. I think that in the later half of this parliamentary term (if the coalition stays together) the Tories will allow the LIb-dems to have a couple of policies to take through to improve their popularity, thus decreasing the labour vote and improving Tory chances of winning.

  13. Waht a country we live in where only 9 per cent of the voters think that the government should obey the law. Lucky for the other 91 per cent that they don’t live in Iran, North Korea or Zimbabwe.

  14. Bernard Disken

    Lucky for the other 91 per cent that they don’t live in Iran, North Korea or Zimbabwe.

    If 91% believe that a law is wrong, then it is about time the law was changed. If we try to enforce laws of which 91% believe is wrong we are in danger of joining the nations you mentioned, ruled by illiberal and undemocratic leaders.

  15. If teh government itself does not obey the law, why should anyone else obey it and why should anyone go to prison for breaking it in the first place? The law was made by a democratically elected government.

  16. Oldnat

    “From what I could understand from the Minister’s Response, they were still trying to find out West Lothian’s postcode.”

    It’s right next to the Shleswig-Holstein question.

    The answer to that was a plebicite and self-detemination.

  17. Bernard
    If teh government itself does not obey the law, why should anyone else obey it and why should anyone go to prison for breaking it in the first place? The law was made by a democratically elected government.

    and the democratically elected government has every right to change the law, to one that reflects the electorate’s view (or 91% of the electorate). I do not think that the 91% wanted the government to break the law but rather to make a law that reflected their view of what was right and just.

    I do agree that the government should never change the law in response to a vociferous minority or threat of civil disobedience. That is not democratic.

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