YouGov’s post-budget poll for the Sun shows a broadly positive reception. Overall 57% think Osborne made the right decisions for the country as a whole, with 23% thinking he made the wrong decisions. 42% think he made the right decisions for them, 33% the wrong ones. Overall government approval is up since before the budget, from 41% at the start of the week to 46% now. Headline voting intention stands at CON 42%, LAB 34%, LDEM 17%.

In YouGov’s pre-budget poll the two obvious concerns for the government were that the public were evenly split on whether the cuts would be fair or unfair (34% thought it would be fair, 35% unfair), and whether they would push the country back into recession or not (40% thought it might). Osborne seems to have made progress with swinging public opinion behind him on both counts. The proportion of people thinking that the deficit will be reduced in a fair way has risen 11 points to 45%, the proportion of people who think cutting the deficit now might put the country back into recession is down to 33%. Overall 50% thought that the budget was fair, compared to 27% who thought it was unfair.

Asking about the specific measures, all but one measure met with the support of a plurality of respondents, with the most popular measures being the rise in personal allowance on income tax and the tax on the banks. Reducing tax credits for families earning over £40k, limiting housing benefit, increasing capital gains tax, restoring the earnings link and helping councils freeze council tax all met with overwhelming support. Support for increasing the pension age to 66, reducing corporation tax and (slightly surprisingly) scrapping the planned increase in tax on cider all met with lukewarm support. The only measure that was opposed by a majority of respondents was the VAT increase – this was supported by 34%, and opposed by 54%.

Despite the overall approval of the budget, people were actually very pessimistic about its short term effects. Optimism about people’s own financial situation over the next 12 months has fallen, with a net optimism falling from minus 43 before the budget to minus 48 now. 55% of respondents said they thought the budget would increase unemployment in the next year or two (19% disagree) and 44% think it will increase poverty (32% disagree).

52% of respondents thought that the Liberal Democrats were right to back the budget, this included 69% of their own voters. 17% of Lib Dem voters thought that they were wrong to do so.

Finally YouGov asked if people thought the economy would be run better if Labour had been in power instead, or if the Conservatives had obtained an overall majority. In both cases people expected the economy would have been run worse, and found the same when asked if Labour or Conservative governments would have looked after the poorer better, or would have better helped people like the respondent. Notably Labour supporters overwhelmingly thought that the Conservatives alone would have been doing a worse job, perhaps suggesting that the Liberal Democrats will be able to sell a narrative that they have tempered a Conservative government (in fact, even 22% of Conservative supporters thought that the Conservatives alone would not have been as good at protecting the poorest in society).

The poll was conducted between Tuesday evening and Wednesday afternoon, so not quite as rapid as some of the instant reaction polls we’ve seen after budgets in the past. All the same, at past budgets we have sometimes seen bad news from the budget emerge in the days that follow, which could alter the public’s reaction. The initial response, however, seems to be that people see the budget as pointing to hard times ahead, but are broadly supportive of it.


281 Responses to “YouGov’s post budget poll”

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  1. Regarding the budget, my thoughts are:
    Labour, to appease the markets, passed legislation affirming that the UK would half its deficit in 4 years.

    IMO, There is no way that Osborne can miss that target & retain any credibility.

    Therefore, like managers the world over ;-), he doubles the cost saving targets because he knows that they won’t be achieved. There will be events that necessitate money being spent – pandemic scare, floods, crash of bank or pension institution to be compensated for etc.

    Osborne also knows that the other side of the equation – growth & spending generating e.g. VAT income – isn’t entirely within his control.

    So, I’m not sure the pace of the cuts is ideological. I think it is politics. Failure to half the deficit in 4 years would be a PR disaster for Osborne. His team was elected (or very nearly) primarily to deal with the deficit. 8-)

  2. Anthony,

    Thanks,

    How did they get the Lib share so wrong at the election?
    Most of the big four got the Con and Lab share almost spot on but the Lib share ?

    Surely it couldn’t have all been down to Cleggs good performance in the debates?

  3. @Amber
    Good point re budget. Osborne and Cameron are politiicans not ideologues. If as I expect they miss their targets/have to backtrack they will be able to claim that they were forced to do so because of the weakness of the European economy – but despite that they will be able to say that they exceeded Labour’s target. As I have said before I think they are politically in a very strong position. Their strategy would I think only be vulnerable if the UK seriously underperformed against the rest of Europe. In a crisis the markets and at least 40% of the electorate would prefer the Tories to be in control.

  4. @AMBER STAR
    First off there is no certainty whatever that Labour would have hit the target you refer to over 4 years or 24 years at the rate they would continue to spend. Furthermore, the Osbourne “team” were not nearly elected they were fully elected, Alexander & Cable are part of his “team” however they are Liberals not Tories.
    I totally agree politics is being indulged in, not some Milton Friedman right wing to prove a point ideology.

  5. @ ROLAND

    You’re a bit nippy today :-) Where did I give an opinion about Labour achieving the target they set?

    Also nice to see that you have so wholeheartedly embraced the coalition & gotten over your initial annoyance that Cameron couldn’t deliver a Tory majority. 8-)

  6. RICHARD IN NORWAY
    I have very much counted my hatched Lib Dems Richard, the alliance is alive and well. Of course Her Majesties Loyal (and in some cases not very loyal) Opposition will with the media’s help try to rent them asunder at every touch and turn, but unless the single issue sandal wearers take over, it will last. If such a disaster ( for the Liberals) takes place, I think we all know who will shed the most blood, put it this way, it wont be blue blood.

  7. @ JOHNTY

    In a crisis the markets and at least 40% of the electorate would prefer the Tories to be in control.
    ————————————————
    Yes – for Tories read “The Bank of England” & you pretty much have it in a nutshell. 8-)

  8. Just wore my fingers to the bone typing a comment which I subsequently lost.

    How do you cut and paste? Sorry to be an ignoramus. :-)

  9. Valerie
    Infuriating isn’t it.

    Highlight the text with your mouse, press Ctl and C together, and to paste press Ctl and V together.

  10. JOHNTY and others

    I have no doubt that Labour would have met the 50% in four years target by the ‘simple’ of expedient of raising income tax.

    I am going to join CHIT (Campaign for Higher Income Tax) because I think that in terms of direct taxes we are undertaxed by European standards and we need to be taxed more via direct taxes (not VAT) if we are going to have a chance of (a) getting rid of the deficit and then (b) ratchetting up our public services to Western European standards.

  11. ANTHONY

    Please take my 11.05am comment out of moderation – it’s very anodyne and certianly not offensive.

  12. In a way it’s quite astonishing how smitten Con posters here are with their LD partners. (Just an observation, no criticism intended.)

    The amusing thing is that the LDs were willing to get into bed with Lab too, and I suppose then Lab posters on here would have been just as much smitten, too.

    To an extent I still feel a sense of LD betrayal, but gradually this feeling is giving way to the pleasure I’m anticipating enjoying when the LDs are mauled at the next GE and their current bed fellow disowns them preferring to be single again. (I’m not bitter.)

    In one or two previous posts I’ve wondered how the LDs will extricate themselves from the coalition and present themselves to the electorate with a distinctive manifesto.

    Has anyone in the LDs given thought to this? Do they care?

    Can any LD posters here offer a view?

  13. ” I’ve wondered how the LDs will extricate themselves from the coalition and present themselves to the electorate with a distinctive manifesto.

    Has anyone in the LDs given thought to this? Do they care? ”

    I would say that comments this week by both Simon Hughes and Tim Fallon show that thev Lib-Dems are aware of their predicament. Its going to be an attempt at a careful balancing act of constructive criticism from within. I think the Lib-Dems are achieving things through the coalition (although maybe not enough for the compromises made). Unfortunately, I think many of the nuances are lost in the broad bruish stroke coverage of much of the media.

  14. @Mike N

    Thanx for that. Think I’ve got it. Now for the pearls of wisdom! Enjoyed your post about the Lib Dems by the way.

    My position has always been anything but the Tories. I voted Labour in the GE and Lib Dem in the council election. Yesterday had a LibDem leaflet telling me the Coalition was all Labour’s fault. So I went online and joined the Labour Party! Felt I had to do something.

  15. Testing

  16. Tonyotim “Its going to be an attempt at a careful balancing act of constructive criticism from within”

    Is that criticism of the Cons? That will be very difficutl if not impossibe I’d have thought. MPs criticising their own colleagues/cabinet is bad and is rarely well-received, but criticism from MPs of another party that you are in coalition with is another matter altogether.

  17. Valerie “Yesterday had a LibDem leaflet telling me the Coalition was all Labour’s fault. ”

    This kind of suggests to me (reading between the lines) that the LDs would have preferred to partner up with Lab, doesn’t it?

    What a bizarre leaflet.
    It’s almost an apology…

  18. I live in Manchester Withington- A Lib Dem/Labour marginal which the Libs held onto. Lib Dem voters tell me that if they had not joined the Coalition then things would be worse. There could have been another election and the Tories could have won an overall majority and produced a harsh, regressive budget. But that is what has happened. As Roland said, the Lib Dems have allowed the Conservatives to behave as tho’ they won a handsome overall majority. For what? A Referendum sometime in the future on AV which the Tories and the press will campaign against? I think the words Tukeys and Xmas come to mind.

  19. Valerie,
    The Libs have managed to get several of their policies adopted, not least the move to increase the basic tax allowance which will mitigate the effect of other tax rises, and will benefit the low-paid proportionately more than the highly-paid.

    As the junior partner in the coalition, they can’t expect their partner to just adopt their policies wholesale.

  20. @Valerie
    If the Lib Dems had refused to go into coalition with the Tories, and the latter as a minority Government had called a second election – which they alone would have had sufficient funds to contest – what do you think the result would have been? What narrative could the Lib Dems have constructed having refused to work with the leading party?
    For the moment the country on balance seems prepared to give the coalition the benefit of the doubt – and with good reason – there is not quite the difference between the political parties that activists like to imagine. We are in a deep hole – and the markets not the politicians are in control.

  21. Before the election, I read an interesting article about Tory plans for Foreign Aid.
    Though ring fenced, the money would be used instead to train a “help workforce” of engineers, nurses, doctors, plumbers, builders etc to bring more expertise to rebuilding/building war torn or poverty stricken areas.

    I thought it rather a good idea, but have heard no more. Has anyone else?

  22. @MIKE N
    I can only speak personally of course, but I am quite representative of a rural Tory. It is not so much that we are smittern as deeply shocked, as they say these days “but in a good way”. I really believed that an alliance with the Libs would be more trouble than it is worth, how could it not be, with the claptrap many of them talk. However, the far more sensible attitudes displayed since the election has impressed me greatly. Further, it is clear that people have taken to idea of a Con/Lib Alliance and are prepared to support it.

  23. @MIKE N
    On the same theme Mike, I think you should guard against this assumption that most Liberals are raving lefties who thought G Brown was a great guy. The Labour party led by Brown seemed to think that the LDs could never stomach the Eton Girls Choir. How wrong were they? Also of course, Clegg is not without some political nous, given the outcome of the GE in seats and votes he could not have proceeded by trying to keep Labour in power.

  24. Just got back so catching up.

    @wayne – apologies, but I won’t desist. Clearly you take the view that the poll evidence suggests massive public support for cuts and then you extrapolate a big Tory lead in twelve months time. You could be right.

    However, the point I made was that while people now know what the numbers are, they have no idea what the cuts themselevs will look like. Today, for example, we have a projection of a cut in police numbers of 35,000. The armed forces have projected cuts of 30,000 staff, mainly front line troops.

    This may well make voters ecstatic and forever Tory – I’m not so sure.

    @Colin – I appreciate Osborne is looking for export growth to China, but breaking that market is a long way off. While the Chinese have said they will reassess the valuation of the yuan, it hasn’t happened yet, and it won’t be a major move for a while yet. It’s a hard country to trade with for many reasons (see Australian directors in prison on criminal charges for example) and it’s going to be an awful long time until UK exports there outstrip exports to Europe. But much of GO’s plan is based on exports now. That’s the problem.

    In fact, I would go further and say that rapid growth in the Brics is actually more of a risk to us than a benefit. They will drive up commodity prices just when our own and our key export markets are weak, creating inflationary pressures that undercut our growth efforts.

    I’m not blaming GO for this in isolation – most European governments have taken the same decision, and that’s the problem.

    I go back to my earlier post. We needed to find a credible medium to long term deficit reduction plan while reducing spending in the short term in a way that creates as little adverse impact on the domestic economy in the short term.

    For the short term, a complete suspension of pension tax relief is a drastic measure, but would halt £40b pa now without affecting people’s spending, unless we all increased our contributions to compensate – an unlikely scenario. The pain would be absorbed over time, and action can always be taken at some future date to replace some of the lost pension earnings. This calms markets and in a few years time we can address the structural deficit against the backdrop of a more secure global economy.

    In my view this would have been a bold yet sensible move in the circumstances.

  25. Immigration Cap?
    As a candidate in the recent election I was asked about this at a hustings and said it was a dead letter and the Tories had no intention of having a cap. Business would not allow.

    Lib Dems in coalition?
    From Scottish experience, I can tell you that the dynamics would have been very different if the Lib Dems had gone in with Labour. It would not at all be a mirror image of the current position. On the contrary, in the Scottish Executive the Lib Dems thrived and Labour complained that the Lib Dems claimed all the publicity for popular things and distanced themselves from all the unpopular things. The difference is that the LDs can walk away at any time from Labour without damaging their electoral chances fatally but this is not the case if they walk away from the Tories unless it is straight in to coalition with Labour without an election. Roland is right that everyone knows who’s blood it will be on the carpet. The truth is the LibDems are in jail and there is no way out.
    It is a dream for the Tories. labour can’t avoid attacking the LDs as it is easier and lots of fun. Media missing the nuances of LD achievements? Mmm?
    By the way I am not saying the LD MPs face oblivion, only absorbtion in to the Tories

  26. These results are truly amazing and most instructive. The same questions, put before the election, would have resulted in not only disapproval by the electorate, but a wipeout for the two parties who now govern us. Look back at similar results recoreded then if you have forgotten.

    Some honeymoon!

  27. Sorry I meant same questions different results of course!!

  28. @ALEC
    You really are a link to the Gordon Brown school of propaganda Alec. Front line troops cut by 35,000. Utter Rubbish.

    Hey, I’v got a good one, reduction of the Old Age Pension to 12 quid a week and no child benefit for single mothers.

  29. @Roland
    I am sure Gordon Brown has a very good school of propaganda but Alec is certainly not part of it. The point is not a scare story about cuts (though I am all in favour of such stories) but the gap between what has been laid out in figures and how that would translate in to realities. Portillo et al were discussing this last night and seemed to be agreeing that the police, army figures etc would be politically magiced away perhaps too be replaced by bigger cuts in benefit.
    All of this ties in with the interesting post recently on politicians of all parties living in a bubble of isolation from the general population. I cannot believe that Osborne for example has any concept of how cuts in housing benefit would actually play out

  30. @ROLAND
    “… think you should guard against this assumption that most Liberals are raving lefties…

    Aye, i now assume most are raving righties. 8-)

  31. @BARNEY CROCKET
    Regarding housing benefit Barney, not paying 100k pa to keep Afghan families in a large house would be an excellent start. It was not a Tory or CON/DEM administration which put us into Afganistan my friend but skimping even more than the last government did will not restore matters. Therefore if benefits have to be cut further to finance war, the people will know who instigated both cuts and war.

  32. @MIKE N
    When discussing Lib Dems in the past, raving leftie nor raving rightie was nessasary. Simply, raving would do. They, at least the leadership, have now got a taste of office and a taste of reality.

  33. I appreciate Osborne is looking for export growth to China, but breaking that market is a long way off.

  34. oops

    Alec
    ” I appreciate Osborne is looking for export growth to China, but breaking that market is a long way off…..etc etc ”

    mmmmmm

    China was our 9th largest export market by sales value in 2009.

    The first eight markets by sales value were all down on 2008.

    China was up by 5.3%

    Of the top 25 export markets by sales value in 2009 only four were up on 2008.

    They were :
    China, HK, Singapore & Saudi.

  35. @COLIN
    Delighted to hear about the Purple Herons.

  36. Others on 7% seems very low. Which party is being affected the most (of the lower ones). One would have thought the greens would have prospered from a fracturing in the yellow vote.

    For yellows to go from 34% to 17% shows very clearly what their own voters (or those favourably disposed towards them) think of Clegg’s recent entente cordial.

    Lastly, if as we are led to believe, only 17% of yellows disapprove of the budget then why has their vote collapsed so much? Is there some other more important issue to yellow peeving them?

    the rudderless reds on 34% is quite solid… as is 42% for blues. Cameron thus far has impressed with his understated style of leadership.

  37. @Roland – “You really are a link to the Gordon Brown school of propaganda Alec. Front line troops cut by 35,000. Utter Rubbish.”

    Apologies – I should have added a rider regarding the source of the reports/scare stories.

    The police themselves have looked at this and were projecting 28,000 cut in police numbers (leaked internal report from Feb 2010) while the 35,000 cut (plus 4,000 cut from community support officers and 20,000 civilian staff cuts) came from a Manchester Business School assessment, although I haven’t read this so it may be a bit of a headline grabber. The Telegraph reported earlier in the year that one police station a week is already closing.

    On troop numbers, the audit Office report from Dec 09 found that the MOD was overspending by £6b pa when looking at all current contracts, and that this MOD figure actually assumed budget growth from 2011 onwards, so before the announcement of a 10 – 15% cut.

    The troop numbers came from a Royal United Services Institute report that took a 13% cut and projected 15% personnel losses that if spread proportionately means 30,000 fighting staff and a further 13,000 civilians. RUSI are the most respected independent defence analysts in the world.
    I humbly apologise for getting the 30,000 figure wrong on the troop cuts.

    What I would suggest is that you might want to consider a retraction regarding my being part of Gordon’s school of propaganda.

    All I am pointing out is what the experts are all saying and that you, (along with virtually veryone else here) have not got the faintest of how bad these cuts will be if GO every manages to put them into practice. Some parts of the public sector historically cherished by the Tories will be decimated.

    And no – I don’t mean that literally – in the case of the police numbers it could be 20% of the force lost.

  38. ROLAND

    Yes-the benefits of climate change ;-)

    It is Lydd which is the good news.
    They must throw it out-Jumbos flying in over huge wintering wildfowl populations on The Marsh & the RSPB reserve….and a nuclear power station.

    Plain stupid.

  39. @Colin – “China was our 9th largest export market by sales value in 2009.The first eight markets by sales value were all down on 2008.”

    For heaven’s sake Colin – if you’re going to use numbers then let’s do it properly.

    UK exports to China 2009 – 2.4% of the total. That’s less than Italy and just a bit more than Sweden! The US market is 6 times more important to us while the EU is 21 times bigger (50.3% and that’s when I stopped counting the former eastern bloc tiddlers).

    So what if exports to China were up by 5.3%? That means a massive boost to UK exports of – oooh – all of 0.127%.

    If you really think export growth of less than a fifth of a percent is what’s going to deliver our golden Tory future then good luck to you. I’m sure we can all club together to take a short term lease on a park bench for you and Roland with a few scraps of cardboard and some (extra low price tax reduced) white cider for company as the country falls apart.

  40. @Colin – “China was our 9th largest export market by sales value in 2009.The first eight markets by sales value were all down on 2008.”

    If you’re going to use numbers then let’s do it properly.

    UK exports to China 2009 – 2.4% of the total. That’s less than Italy and just a bit more than Sweden. The US market is 6 times more important to us while the EU is 21 times bigger (50.3% and that’s when I stopped counting the former eastern bloc tiddlers).

    So what if exports to China were up by 5.3%? That means a boost to UK exports of all of 0.127%.

  41. @Roland
    Your comment sums up my point. Everyone has heard about an Afghan family or similar but my point is about the effects on local councils. If people are evicted because of reduction in housing benefit what happens?
    At present to take my own city as an example we have 7000 cases on our housing list. None of them is being housed and very few have any chance of being housed. All of our allocations are going to homeless people. We have a statutory duty to house them. Even now we are proposing to buy hotels, take over boarding houses and radical steps too numerous to go through. Nearly all of this is predicated on the council getting in income based on HB.
    Even greater crisis in housing is in practical terms unthinkable.
    We also have a problem with travelling people of various kinds setting up camp in chaotic conditions, excrement all the rest of it. I have just returned from meeting 180 of my very angry constituents. Our permanent travellers site is full … and it relies entirely on HB.
    As I say Osbourne etc don’t seem to understand any of this.
    In these circumstances our elections may take an ever greater lead from local issues which may yet spring big surprises

  42. Alec – “All I am pointing out is what the experts are all saying and that you, (along with virtually veryone else here) have not got the faintest of how bad these cuts will be if GO every manages to put them into practice. Some parts of the public sector historically cherished by the Tories will be decimated.”

    I’m beginning to see Alec. :(

  43. Roand Haines

    “I suppose the Scots can start hateing Osbourne now rather than Thatcher.”

    Not unless he puts on a blue hat and lectures the Church of Scotland on moral values.

    GO just doesn’t have the qualities to match MT nobody except the Duke of Cumberland could ever be compared for popularity.

  44. @Pete B and Johnty

    I just informed my Lib Dem friend of his new status as a ‘junior partner’ in the coalition. He is practising doffing his cap for when the squire rides past. Oh and he wont be renewing his membership

    I think a £1000 increase in personal tax allowance will not make up for the increase in VAT

  45. @ VALERIE

    Oh and he wont be renewing his membership
    ————————————————–
    He could join the Labour Party & have a vote in the leadership contest 8-)

    I was very pleased to read you have joined :-)

  46. Roger Mexico

    “I have long thought that current capitalism is an almost entirely religious phenomenon. Unfortunately we seem to be in the hands of true believers.”

    Again you hit the target, but we may be in luck.if DC can play off his right against the LibDems.

    New Labour had the fundamentaists and leader-cult fans too, of course.

    By design, the Scottish parliament avoids giving power to a party with such a majority that allows extremists to take it over.

  47. The lib dem leadership have themselves to thank for their “prison” they are in. They could have negotiated seriously with Labour but Clegg et al wanted the Tories more. They are from that wing. The Labour and Lib Dem manifesto’s fitted better especially as Brown less Labour would have been happy to drop ID cards. The numbers were tight but do able probably for two years.

  48. Although it’s impossible to predict conditions five years hence, given the typical structure of a business cycle there are fairly good odds that there will be positive economic news in 2015, the pain of the budget cuts will be a thing of the past, and the coalition will be viewed positively.

    However, that’s unlikely to help the Liberal Democrats much. If voters like the way that a Conservative-led coalition is performing, aren’t they likely to vote Conservative? And while the Liberal Democrats might pick up a few votes from those who like the coalition’s performance, but can’t bring themselves to vote Tory, that’s unlikely to compensate for those voters who defect either to Labour (to punish the LibDems for supporting the Tories) or to the Conservatives (because they are satisfied with a Conservative-led government and see no point in voting LibDem).

    So the Liberal Democrats are in a cleft stick; they lose if they are successful, and they lose if they are unsuccessful. Such are the penalties for being a third party. And while the introduction of AV might help them a little, unlike proportional systems, it does not significantly lower the likelihood of Labour or the Conservatives winning a majority of seats in 2015 (depending which way the wind is blowing at the time), and in either case the LibDems will be unceremoniously dumped back in opposition.

    In the long run, of course, it can’t hurt to have had experience in government, something long lacking except for those ex-Labour ministers who came in with the SDP (now retired or kicked upstairs). But the circumstances in which the Liberal Democrats could sit in government again, outside of the once-in-a-blue-moon hung parliament, are obscure. To become the main party of government, they would need to become the second largest party _first_; and that means displacing either Red or Blue. But which one, and how? When, in the 1920s, Labour overtook the Liberals as the 2nd party, they all along had their sights set on destroying the Liberals as the default party of the left. Since Labour was campaigning to the left of the Liberals, that was only common sense. But the Liberal Democrats haven’t got it so easy. Do they want to displace the Conservatives as the primary opposition to Labour, or displace Labour as the opposition to the Conservatives? Or will they continue the balancing act of staying in the middle and picking off random voters from both sides? That only worked as long as they could be all things to all people, a “none of the above” vote. But having joined government, that option would seem to be closed for the immediate future.

  49. I think the leading article in the times sums up the LD situation perfectly

    http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/opinion/leaders/article2573103.ece

  50. ALEC

    “If you’re going to use numbers then let’s do it properly. ”

    I thought I did ?

    Did I claim exports to China were significant ( yet) ?

    I was trying to respond to your to your rather negative comments about UK’s ability to do business there.

    The stats indicate that UK has made a start. Growth in exports to China compared with our major markets -in the recession-has been encouraging I would say.

    Anyway Alec-you have worn me down- I accept that we have not a cat’s chance in hell of increasing our exports, or competing overseas, or growing the private sector in the North, or rebalancing our economy away from deficit funded State spending, or reducing the deficit without destroying all our public services & starving the poor, throwing millions onto the streets & serving up small children in casseroles at Bankers dinners……….

    ………..unless we do it your way-or bring Gordon back.

    OK ?

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