The Sun’s YouGov questions todayfound 55% of people supported £6 billion in spending cuts being carried out this year, with 28% thinking they should be delayed till next year amd 6% opposing them completely. Of course, non-specific cuts are likely to be more popular than whatever the government eventually decide to cut. YouGov also asked specifically about the expected rise in VAT to 20% – this was far less popular, only 31% saif they supported it, with 63% opposed.

The tables for YouGov’s Sunday Times poll are also up on the website here. Amongst other things they include a voting intention question, showing topline figures of CON 37%, LAB 34%, LDEM 21%. This is in line with the weekend polls from ICM and ComRes which also showed a shift of about 3 points from the Liberal Democrats to Labour since the general election.

On other questions, Prime Ministerial approval ratings for David Cameron and Deputy PM approval ratings for Nick Clegg were both pretty much as you’d expect in a honeymoon period: good net positives (+36 for Cameron and +32 for Clegg), but with high levels of don’t knows for both (40% in each case) as people haven’t really had much time to judge yet. Other questions on the coalition were pretty much in line with the findings we’ve seen elsewhere – people are broadly positive, but don’t expect it to last 5 years.

YouGov also asked about the Labour leadership, and like the companies found David Miliband in the lead, in this case on 29% compared to 7% for Ed Miliband and 6% for Ed Balls. YouGov also asked which candidate would make respondents least likely to vote Labour, and found Ed Balls the clear leader on 27% of all voters, and perhaps most importantly, amongst current Labout voters, 20% of whom said Ed Balls would be the leader least likely to make them vote Labour.

On unrelated matters, I have updated the lists of target seats to base them on the 2010 election results (Conservative target seats here, Labour here, Liberal Democrats targets here. They are all academic to a large extent, since the government propose to start a boundary review that will report in time for the next election, but they’ll do for now. If the government do hope their boundary review will report in time for 2015, then they will probably have to start the review as soon as possible, so for the psephologically minded one thing to look out for in the Queen’s speech next week will be whether the bill to reduce the number of MPs is there (and when the Bill itself arrives, how it changes the rules the Boundary Commissions operate upon). Since I’ve veered slightly off topic, I may as well take the opportunity to heartily endorse Sunder Katwala’s post on why it is a tragedy that Phil Cowley’s research on Parliamentary rebellions has still not received new funding.


405 Responses to “More YouGov polling on the coalition”

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  1. @ Matt

    Yes, it was crude :-(. Somewhat deliberate, I admit :-(. Apologies.

    I certainly would not advocate anything like equal earning and alike… It’s getting quite meaningless anyway with the current productivity levels. Yes, there is self-interest and will be, but from this does not follow that the society has to be organised in a particular way… But I also don’t think that one can design a society (just look at Eastern Europe: where did designer capitalism get to).

  2. @Laszlo,

    No worries, or need for an apology. :-) I certainly wasn’t offended – nor would other Tories be, I suspect. :-)

    I have to say that your posts have interested me greatly, despite the fact that I am a Tory. :-)

  3. @Laszlo,

    “Yes, there is self-interest and will be, but from this does not follow that the society has to be organised in a particular way… But I also don’t think that one can design a society (just look at Eastern Europe: where did designer capitalism get to).”

    Yes, I agree.

    Even though I would not be classed by many as a socialist myself, I do not see it in such terms. I see the left and right-wings as being on a continuum, with extreme socialism on the extreme left and a completely socialist-free system on the right (i.e. total free markets). In reality, even most right-wingers believe in some degree of socialism.

    My own views fall somewhere in the middle. I accept that we need some degree of socialism to provide social care and help others, but I also believe in a free market system (with some restriction/regulations). That way, we get the best of both worlds XD.

  4. @Matt

    “My own views fall somewhere in the middle. I accept that we need some degree of socialism to provide social care and help others, but I also believe in a free market system (with some restriction/regulations). That way, we get the best of both worlds XD.”

    Sounds good to me.

    Sometimes the Labourites on this site show that they think that to be rightwing means you must have zero compassion – an outdated stereotype that was always too sweeping anyway.

  5. @BT,

    “Sometimes the Labourites on this site show that they think that to be rightwing means you must have zero compassion – an outdated stereotype that was always too sweeping anyway.”

    I agree.

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