We have the first few polls about the coalition coming in. YouGov’s daily polling for the Sun this week found 56% approval, 38% disapproval on Wednesday, growing to 60% approval, 33% disapproval on Thursday. There was scepticism about how long it would last though – 28% think it will be less than a year, with only 10% thinking it will last the intended 5 years.

ComRes also produced a poll for the Daily Politics today, asking about hopes for the coalition. There was broad optimism about the its ability to reduce the deficit (60% thought it would be effective, 29% ineffective), 54% thought it would clean up politics, 36% disagreed. People were less optimistic how the coalition would deal with the NHS (43% thought it would be effective, 45% that it wouldn’t) and crime (45% effective, 45% ineffective).


204 Responses to “Polls on the coalition”

1 2 3 4 5
  1. @James,

    I agree with you on Georgie boy. Thus far, he has proven himslef to be bold and imaginative. He is certainly less flippant than one would want from a chancellor. He’ll make a good fist of being chancellor.

  2. @Mike R,

    “So far the Conservatives have kept their pre-election promises, cutting their own salaries & visiting the country starting with Scotland. David Cameron is becoming the countries “darling” – he and the Liberals will soar in popularity over the coming months and years – even Scotland will come back into the national fold.”

    I disagree. This government will be very unpopular given the scale of the spending cuts and tax rises that are coming. As a Conservative voter myself, I am not too worried about mid-term poll performance, however. The incumbent is usually unpopular mid-term anyway, and the polls usually trend towards the incumbent in the last 6 months prior to a GE. This will be especially true if the economy starts growing nicely again by 2015.

    So, in summary, whilst opinion polls will be interesting in the next couple of years (and I must stress that the coalition might not last that long), I would strongly caution against reading too much into them. Also, remember that the planned constituency boundary changes mean that Labour will have to do much better in the polls to win the next GE. This is obviously only if the changes do take place.

  3. On Sky News a few minutes ago. Two females (sorry don’t know their names) reviewing the papers made the point that the papers almost seem to be inventing cracks in the coalition. Their point was that it should be given a chance to see what coalition government can achieve. Couldn’t agree more.

  4. @ Eoin

    “the 500 million other female followers of Islam.”

    Well-that’s a huge subject isn’t it?

    I am in favour of the freedom to follow-or to lead-so long as it is freely done.

    I am against the need to obey ( aka follow) because of familial, cultural, male, religious…or any other dictat

    And….Islam….the Q’ran?…..or mysogynyst tribal culture?

    The word of God?……or the word of my Father & my Brother , because I am a mere woman?

    Show me a religious book that decrees the subjugation of women to men’s thoughts & deeds.
    You will struggle.

    But I will show you legions of old men & old women, subjugating ( yes & mutilating) their daughters in the name of a “belief” which they must “follow”–and in THIS country !

  5. Expect the media to come down hard on the Conservatives in the next few years. The media always turns on the incumbent at some stage after the honeymoon period is over. It makes their coverage seem more relevant/interesting. :-)

  6. @Colin,

    As I think I have explained before. This is the subject of my second book. I could, at length, rebut that. But I wont. Suffice to say a quick skim through the old testament and one quickly finds it laced will tales of traitorous women. Pillar’s of salt, locks of hair, half chewed apples, absent mothers, prostiutes. Our own faith is no better. Women’s marginalisation occurs in all creeds and I for one resist the tempation to climb upon a 21st Century pedal stool.

    As for Warsi’s chosen path, if you get a chance try and follow up a political topic known as ‘triple jeopardy’. It will help illuminate the pressures of identity upon Muslim women. If you are particularly interested in taking it further, then the writings of Valentine Moghodam are a good starting point.

  7. @Colin,

    As I think I have explained before. This is the subject of my second book. I could, at length, rebut that. But I wont. Suffice to say a quick skim through the old testament and one quickly finds it laced will tales of fallen women. Pillar’s of salt, locks of hair, half chewed apples, absent mothers. Our own faith is no better. Women’s marginalisation occurs in all creeds and I for one resist the tempation to climb upon a 21st Century pedal stool.

    As for Warsi’s chosen path, if you get a chance try and follow up a political topic known as ‘triple jeopardy’. It will help illuminate the pressures of identity upon Muslim women. If you are particularly interested in taking it further, then the writings of Valentine Moghodam are a good starting point.

  8. One of the more interesting results from GE night was that the Labour vote seemed to hold pretty strong amongst Muslims. This surprised me somewhat, I must admit.

  9. @Matt,

    Interesting. The respect party’s support tumbled. Brown would not have aroused the same distaste among followers of Islam that his predecessor did.

    i also note that 31% of Labour MPs are women. Seems like we might finally be making some progress.

  10. Eoin

    “Women’s marginalisation occurs in all creeds ”

    It does indeed.

    Saida Warsi knows that well-and speaks & acts against it.

    I admire her courage.

  11. @Colin,

    Yes that is to be admired. It just worries me when we talk of assimilation.

  12. @Eion Clarke @Colin

    I agree that beliefs, values and traditions are important, and women who argue/fight against opression of women. However, I think the social structures in various communities (including Christian) are more important than simply the arguments. No doubt that both the Bible and the Qur’an are reflections of patriarchal societies – and in fairly large pockets these societies exist in the UK. Until the economic basis of these exist, the various religious texts can be used to legitimise the oppression of women, thus the argument of what the Bible or the Qur’an say “really” is meaningful only for those whose life circumstances have already undermined the acceptance of these values and beliefs.

    One can see how much socioeconomic changes count when considering the re-evaluation of women in Catholic teachings. The raising of Mary in these teachings in the 19th century was a direct result of men turning away from the church more than women. It was in a sharp contrast with earlier teachings.

  13. I think women’s voting patterns will be particularly important in the next election. Changed labour market structures (while it has been continuous since the 50s, there have been some abrupt changes in the last 15-18 years) mean that government policies would affect men and women differently.

    It seems that, so far, the conservatives know this, hence the little romanticisation of “the” family (apart from the marriage allowance) observable. And the LibDems will help the coalition in this.

  14. I’m disappointed that no party – especially the coalition – has proposed a tapering of capital gains tax. A tax of say 60% on gains made when the asset has been held for less than 30 days, falling to income tax rates after that and tapering to zero after say fifteen years would go a long way to penalising speculation amd encouraging investment and long-term holding. Such a tax could be extended to asset classes it currently doesn’t cover, such as residential housing and currencies. It would also discourage hedge funds buying into companies that are “in play” and so reduce short-termism in industrial policy.

  15. Eoin

    “It just worries me when we talk of assimilation.”

    The word is in not “assimilation”-it is “choice”

    It is fine for educated -exiled-Iranian women to understand that they have a right to escape the tyranny of their menfolk & culture ( not to mention their present government), and be able to do so.

    It is as fine for an educated Irishman to take the “road less travelled” away from whatever tribal/cultural norms he has rejected-when all he suffers is the guilt of “hypocrisy”

    It is another thing to expect uneducated girls , living in male dominated tribal cultures, to understand that it is not God who requires their subjugation, but their menfolk.They have neither the strength, nor the knowledge to excercise the choice of the former two individuals. And it is no coincidence that the first link in the chain of subjugation is so often the denial of education to girls.

    And whilst our troops die in the cause of the emancipation & education of such women in Afghanistan-it is absolutely unacceptable that those “cultural” chains are paraded on our streets, and in our communities-and in the name of God.

    This is what Warsi stands against-and I have no hesitation in applauding her. That she is abused on the streets for it by (some) muslim men tells you eveything you need to know about their views on choice for women.

  16. Colin,

    You said “It is another thing to expect uneducated girls , living in male dominated tribal cultures, to understand that it is not God who requires their subjugation, but their menfolk.They have neither the strength, nor the knowledge to excercise the choice of the former two individuals. And it is no coincidence that the first link in the chain of subjugation is so often the denial of education to girls.”

    That sounds like a typical conservative white male dominated home. :) Many English women are discouraged from educational advancement in the science and engineering subjects because they are considered male.

    Given that Instnbul nad Tehran have thriving female univeristy populations it is a bit selective to pick some backwater in the Kandahar Valley.

  17. “That sounds like a typical conservative ”

    Got it in one Eoin.

  18. Colin,

    Allow me to draw your attention to recent research relating to Muslin Women’s education in Europe. It might help explain how I view the problems confronting Muslim women as not simply within their own culture…. The report says:

    “not all Muslim women have the internal drive, strength, or have been exposed to sufficient stimuli to take such a step.” Doing so not only involves breaking free of the narrow-mindedness which still exists in some closely-knit Muslim communities, but resisting external racism, social stigmatism and ignorant assumptions that they are “oppressed and illiterate”.

    “They are daily resisting and negotiating on two fronts,” the report says: “With patriarchal norms and family structures in the community, and externally with prejudice coming from the non-Muslim environment.”

  19. @Eoin, Colin

    That sounds like a typical conservative white male dominated home

    I bought up my daughter from the age of 4 on my own. Because her best friend had considerable problems in her home situation she virtually lived with me from the age of 10 to 16. I would have loved them to go into science or engieering.

    During that time I encouraged the teo of them to have as many friends over as they wanted. My bar-b-q’s became famous in the village.

    As a result I became something of an expert in the mindset of the teenage girl today.

    Thier choice of future career IMO in vastly more inflenced by TV, both adverts and programs (sopas are the pits), magazines and lastly their peers,

    I also got to know many of their parents and I cannot imagine any of them who would have discouraged their daughters from a technical career.

    I absolutely agree that they are discouraged from technical careers but the fault does not usually lie in the home anymore.

  20. @John F,

    I meant conservative with a small c but thanks for that. I think the private domain especially in rural and religous households still discourage extended academia for girls. My partner comes from such a ultra religous household and young women (including herself) are strongly disuaded from taking education too far. It affects countires like Ireland, Greeece and Italy much worse than England I think, but it is certainly very dominant in religous countries.

  21. Anthony A – how people say they voted at the general election.

  22. @Eoin

    Yes, you are almost certainly correct. I have no experience of that myself.

    Of course the sad thing is that here in England, having escaped from the ultra- religious influence they have become prey to the other influence I mentioned before.

    I cannot watch an advert on TV from any of the cosmetic companies without wanting to thow my glass through the screen.

    I do not becuase it would be such a waste of good whiskey >:(

  23. So, 17% Strongly disapprove,
    13% strongly approve.

    Tend to approve 43
    Tend to disapprove 21

    We definitely need to bear in mind that these are not VI polls. I would be in the “tend to approve” category for instance, but would not vote for the coalition. Lots of Labour people – senior and grassroots – thought a Lib/Lab alliance would be unworkable and we didn’t want it, so a Con/Lib alliance was our “choice” in that sense. All those people probably “tend to approve”.

  24. John Fletcher – What a nice man you seem to be :)

  25. Sadik Khan supporting Eddie then and speech about reconnecting with people.
    He’s growing on me Eoin.

  26. Sadik Khan – Hmmmm “Build a Labour coalition” Cheesy, but spot on. Just what I want.

  27. @ Sue M

    What a nice man you seem to be
    _______________________________________
    I’ not sure my ex-wife or my ex-MD would agree with you, but I seem to be able to rub along with everyone else. I guess I don’t really like people who tell me what to do

    I have become increasingly interested in following your points of view.

    I have always been one nation Conservative. (I voted UKIP because the Cons were never going to loose here and I want to keep them honest on their European policy)

    I teneded to lump everyone else into a group I called “the left”. and I never really thought about the nuances that exisited in that group. Following your conversation with fellow progresives (I hope you don’t mind that description) has been facinating.

  28. @John F,

    Sorry I popped out to our Botanical gardens for osme fresh air…. Adverts grrr they are atrocious. My wee man was trying to post of gold not long ago. he was convinced a cheque would return in its palce.

    @Sue,

    I am happy to hear that! :) Yes, Sadiq is quite clued in fella.

  29. Eoin -thanks for that.

    From your extract I found the Univ of Cambridge study & note that the summary ended with this :-

    “None of the respondents expressed any desire to live under existing sharia law systems. The report says their recurring aspirations as European citizens are “unexceptionally ordinary” – to live in peace and within the law, to feel integrated, to receive a good education and to have a decent job and a happy family life.”

    I hope any UK government would try to ensure those desires are achieved.

    Baroness Warsi seems especially placed to ensure it is so-and I am sure she will.

  30. @Colin,

    I agree. Faith and matters associated with it should never be allowed to influence the law of the land. They are private matters.

    Thus, in my case I am personally opposed to abortion for instance but I fully accept the legal right for a woman to choose. Muslim’s are no different. if they want to live iN Britain then they must abide by the laws of Britain.

    As for Warsi, she has had her own conflicts in this regard. (for example matters relating to the old ‘section 28’). To her credit she has ironed most of these ideological contradictions out.

  31. @ Eoin

    Ref Adverts.

    The blame for the current recession is laid at the doors of Bankers, or Regulators or irresponsible Governments, but the reality is that no one was forced into borrowing money.

    IMO the whole crisis was fuled by Advertisments and applaing TV/movie programming which lead people to believe that the only route to happiness was by conspicuos consumption.

    If there is a silver lining to the cloud of this recession, it is that a generation my develop who realise that there is more to life than “shopping”

  32. @John F,

    Correct. Consumerism has a lot to answer for. The French have a much more sensible attiude to it. As long as we continue to ‘keep up with the jones’ I see Britain and the US repeating this s,me mistake many times.

    Ironically, it used to be a major criticism of old leftie governments that they fell behind the western world in the luxuries and cmmodities market. But at least their stagnation did not have boom and bust. I’d prefer the former over the latter every time. :)

  33. Thanks John

    Now, despite often being called tribal or blinkered, you might all note that I haven’t commented on my feelings toward this coalition yet. Enhanced majority, yes, but nothing else.

    Now that things are settling down a bit, I feel more able to comment.

    The opportunity arose for the LibDems to get what they always wanted. To prove that coalition could work. IMO, the way the deal was done was an enormous mistake.
    There had been so much press about Libs not working with Labour etc, that it became too much about ideology. The minute Nick Clegg made the choice to talk to the Tories first and announce it independently, there developed an impression that this is what he wanted. He should have gone to GB, explained his position and let GB announce what would happen next. Constitutionally, that would have been right and would have made Clegg seem less partial.

    As I watched the negotiations unfold, it started to feel like a merger rather than a coalition. I had always assumed coalition would mean both parties keeping their identities and I assumed that when the public said they voted for a hung parliament, it was because they didn’t want any one party making all the choices, they wanted checks and balances.

    To me, this feels like a Conservative government – Clegg is too similar to Cameron and again, if the parties keep a distinctive voice, this won’t matter as much, but if not, then the LibDems just seem to be selling out, chasing power. I don’t believe “the public” this great unified body of opinion (??) wanted the Libs to STRENGHTEN a Conservative administration, I believe if they wanted anything, they wanted the Libs to QUESTION it, temper it.

    Now, the agenda does look quite progressive. There are some good policies and in a different time it might do some great things. The problem seems to me that nothing will really matter beyond spending cuts and deficit. We will, therefore, see a period of Thatcherite cuts that will be painful and anything radical will be swallowed up. This will cement opinion even more that the Libs are Conservative at heart. The media like this idea and are all too keen to point out how similar in background Clegg and Cameron are and how elitist the cabinet feels.

    I would like very much to see the Libs remain the Libs and the Tories remain the Tories, working together to find solutions for both the progressive AND conservative problems we face and it seems to me this is what people hoped they might get when they didn’t award Cameron a mandate. The more the LibDems seem “swallowed” up by the Tories, the more difficult this coalition will become.

  34. @ EOIN

    Ironically, it used to be a major criticism of old leftie governments that they fell behind the western world in the luxuries and cmmodities market. But at least their stagnation did not have boom and bust. I’d prefer the former over the latter every time

    __________________________________________

    I visited East Berlin many times. Any member of the occuping forces had the right to enter any sector of Berlin in unifom unhindered.

    It was a sad colourless place. Ok everyone had jobs and food but there was no joy in the place or its people.

    At the end of the day they voted with their feet at the first opportunity and bought the wall down.

    Where do we find the balance beween the control economy/society and unrestricted individual/commercial freedom is I suppose what our politics is really all about.

  35. @Sue,

    I agree with your main argument. This “merger” is an eminently sensible move for the blues. People will fear a Cameron government much less. The coalition does have the feel of a conservative government. I think now cameron realyl can say that the Conservative party Has changed. The silence from the right wing of the party stunned me. Alan Duncan accepting a post likewise shocked me. Credt to DC where it is due. He has managed to bring his party much further than I ever thought possibel. Accepting the yellows intot he fold, and gettign away with it, may well prove to be his clause IV moment.

    I see no reason to believe that yellows are anything but finished. They may well gain AV but end up with less seats than they have now. Even an STV voting system may be worth little to them if the voters fail to distinguish them from blue in 5 years time. Thus, only one winner so far.

  36. @John F,

    But at least they did not have Paris Hilton ;) I am teasing- i take your point :)

  37. John/Eoin – Funny, I was thinking last night about how the only country to avoid the worst of this recession were China. They might not be fully communist any more, but surely the world might make SOME judgement on whether Capitalism turned out to be more effective than Communism in the long run?
    China now have all the cash, all the manufacturing and hold most of the capitalist world’s debt.

  38. @Sue Marsh:

    China was not the only country to avoid the worst of the recession. India & Indonesia did, too. Australia also only had one quarter of negative growth & no significant bank collapses.

    I know Indonesia well & it has never been even slightly left-wing since Sukarno was removed from power in the 1960s.

  39. I have been quiet for the last few days, feeling quite lost as to where I am to post my remarks, which at the moment, seeing the scarcity of polls and their somewhat irrelevance as its still early days for the ConDems (i would suggest the autumn polls as being the first true indication of how things stand in CobDem Nation), are by and large related to the coalition itself and their policies.

    Anthony has made it very clear that he does not want a discussion on these matters, so I have tried to respect his policy. However I feel I have to say somethings, and hope that Anthony is a bit lenient here ;)

    I shall post shortly. If nothing comes up you know why. I would be lost in Anthony’s labyrinth of moderation ;)

  40. @ Sue Marsh

    I agree that it feels like a merger – essentially two wings of the conservatives that were in two different parties came together. The LibDem “left” was paralysed by the lack of choice and the Tory right had no other choice either.

    I don’t think that the coalition agreement is a particularly liberal one – the key issues are those of the Tory Party (while I’m happy for cancelling the ID card plans and some changes in the detention centres, I’m afraid these are not the most important issues (and anyway compare the abolishing a few hundred CCTV cameras with withdrawal from the Social Chapter of the EU). And maybe I’m paranoid, but I think these will be sweeteners for implementing really bad policies. The liberal elements in the policies could be rendered meaningless, if people have the choice of sleeping rough, between clothing and food, between accepint workplace hiearchies or finding themselves out of livelihood). Not suprising as the LibDem manifesto was not written for getting into power.

    Excepting for a miracle, I agree Eoin that it will finish off the LibDem party.

  41. @ Eoin / Sue

    I think all 3 of us, plus most commentators are agreed that the LD’s will be gobbled up one way or the other.

    @ Sue

    Ref China.

    Don’t forget India. Their development has been just as impressive and they are the biggest democracy in the world.

    In the end the rise of some SE Asian countries will not IMO be as a result of the politics of the Government but its stability, thus allowing investment and the release of the entreprenurial spirt and energy in vast well educated and stable countries.

  42. @ John Fletcher

    India is interesting, and I agree with your points about education of many people and about democracy (though with quite big pinch of salt) but I think there are several major problems for me to believe the breakthrough there.

    Firstly, unbelievable poverty. Some of the resources are actually from keeping a large proportion of the population to bare existence.

    Secondly, 650 million farmers. I don’t see how the transformation could be done democratically within an acceptable timescale.

    Thirdly, insufficient growth in manufacturing to provide sufficient amount of work.

    Fourth. The single largest group of the working class in India is the domestics. This is a terrible drain on economic resources.

  43. @Laszlo

    I agree with much of what you say.

    I was using India in the context of Sue’s point about the success of China under a communist Govt.

    Derek P has also rightly bought Indonesia into play.

    Many of the problems that you correctly point out that exist in India apply to china and Indonesia as well.

    The thrust of my arguement is that the developement of these countires all be it incomplete and imperfect had be because of the stabiltiy of their Governments, communist, democratic or otherwise.

  44. @ John Fletcher – “I think all 3 of us, plus most commentators are agreed that the LD’s will be gobbled up one way or the other.”

    I don’t agree. I agree that it’s possible, but not that it’s inevitable. If the coalition works and the Lib Dems play a sound, prominent role in it, it could be very good for them in the long run – a lot better than perennial third place, anyway. It will demonstrate that 1) coalitions can work (important if we’re ever to get PR) and 2) that Lib Dems are a serious party of government with capable people who, after this, will have actual ministerial experience.

    I don’t think the Lib Dems have much to lose really, except an eternity of being on the outside looking in. Now they’re on the inside looking out and have a chance to change forever the charges that they’re “a nice idea but won’t work in practice”.

    It could go wrong for them, of course, but it could also work very well for them. This really looks like 21st Century politics, for the first time.

  45. With regards the coalition, I have already stated that it can’t last seeing as the party grassroots are so different and opposed to each other. There is a measure of good will from both sides taking a wait and see attitude, but I have serious reservations that shall goodwill will be forthcoming when tough calls are to be made.

    This does not mean that the coalition itself will disintegrate as there is a high level of pragmatism, cynicism and opportunism in the leaders of the coalition, to turn it communist if they felt that that would be popular and keep them firmly stuck to their government seats.

    However, we have been told that this coalition is a progressive one and that the Libs will put a stop to the more fringe ideas of the Tories. Well the first few signs say otherwise.

    We can start with the already strained relationship between GO and VC. The latter wants to veer strongly to the left with his dealings with the banks, and in response the former quietly has made it clear that for that Vince is not to go within a 100yards of the banks. The direction is pretty clear. This is why, I contend, Vince felt he had to come out and say what he thinks needs to be done to get the banks under control. Thats what I call a pre-emptive strike.

    With regards to cuts, well not a lot needs be said. Theresa May has not discounted cuts in the numbers of police. The NHS is not protected from extensive cuts, which though might not be direct front line services cuts, they will undoubtedly lead to a shabbier service then we got used to. Most tax credits will get the axe. For all the fuss about the NI rise, we now know that the worse part of it, that is the part which is to be borne by the employee will still go through – so basically workers will pay but business will not. The education department will also get heavily cut – first as all deps will have to cut their budgets, but secondly because a lot of funding is to be channeled into the support needed for the setting up of private schools. Local councils will also see a dramatic drop in funding (which seems to contrast with the coalitions decentralization plans).

    Re civil liberties and the such. All we seem to be getting are some token measures, such as the removal of ID cards – hardly the biggest threat to civil liberties. On the other hand for the liberals out there a read of Theresa May’s new priorities should give you a most clear picture of where this government will steer the Home Office. In an report on the Telegraph we find out that the HO’s priorities shall be:

    Refuses to rule out a cut in the number of police officers under plans to reduce the Home Office budget.
    Pledges to end the “health and safety culture” in the police and return officers to the beat.

    Says she does not believe that there should be an absolute limit on the population but adds that plans are under way to introduce an annual cap for immigration from outside the European Union.

    Announces plans to take samples of the DNA of every prisoner in an attempt to make it easier to catch reoffenders.

    Says the Government will push ahead with directly-elected “police chiefs” despite opposition from some chief constables.

    The new Conservative-led administration is poised to introduce a “Good Samaritan” law, which offers immunity to people intervening in an attempt to prevent crime or anti-social behaviour.

    Very liberal agenda indeed. I can see a lot of civil liberterians extolling the virtues of vigilantism.

    Political Reform – Here there are some interesting ideas, so good yet some very very bad. Its great that we will get an elected HoL on the basis of PR. I am somewhat worried by what this coalition means by further decentralisation and devolution, but I agree with the notions on principle so will wait and see. The 55% rule is a democratic travesty – I hope it never sees the light of day. Fixed term parliaments has its virtues but a 5 year term is too long – it does seem the term has been established on the basis of political expediency and considerations, rather than on any constitutional and democratic values.

    Foreign policy – It is clear that we will have a populist FP. We will be active partners of the EU, whilst despising everything it does. We will be strong allies to America, but will not participate in their attempts to save the economy with high intervention and will not support them that strongly in Afganistan. Cake and eat it kind of FP which will only irritate our allies and diminish further our standing in the world.

    The crux of the whole deal is not in what it contains, but in what was left out. Its hard to imagine that a 6 page document represent all areas of government. The Cons know this. They know that government is not about the big things but about the small day to day administration. This will be pretty much a pure Con government, which however will be legitimized by the presence of the LibDem. This will be Thatcherism with a nice face put on it.

    This might be partisan but its all based on the info, interviews and speeches this government has given thus far.

    I think the composition of the cabinet speaks volumes with regards to the which british demographic will be calling the shots. For a more representative government, which are the values of coalitions, this one falls well short.

  46. @James L
    It could go wrong for them, of course, but it could also work very well for them. This really looks like 21st Century politics, for the first time.
    __________________________________________

    I am a glass half full person, and also try to think well of people and their actions until they prove otherwise.

    C&C have taken risks and I am prepared to believe that they were at least partly putting the country ahead of party self interest.

    For the sake of the country I really hope this Govt is a sucess and manages to restore both the economy and some of our freedoms.

    If they do manage to pull this off the of course they will both deserve the rewards for their bravery.

    But IMO it will be very difficult for th LD’s to carve out a separate identity for themselves after a few years in coalition.

  47. @ John Fletcher

    Yes, I agree with your point re. China and Indonesia. And of course China is not communist, even if the Communis Party is in power (although this power is highly fragmented).

    Latin America remains interesting though…

  48. @Xiby

    Its hard to imagine that a 6 page document represent all areas of government

    __________________________________________

    You would appear to be a glass half full sort of chap :D

    Serioulsy though IMO governemnts always try to do far too much.

    6 pages seem perfect to me. I would rather they did only a little but got is right than do lots and lots and make a complete mess of it.

  49. @ John – “But IMO it will be very difficult for th LD’s to carve out a separate identity for themselves after a few years in coalition.”

    Possibly, though who really knows what will happen in a few years’ time.

    If we do move towards a less adversarial sort of politics (and perhaps towards PR), a separate identity may not need to be as distinct as we’ve been used to under FPTP. Perhaps nuance, rather than clear water ideological differences, is the future.

  50. @John Fletcher

    What i meant by that, is that government has to take lots of day to day amdin decisions, like:

    which school to invest in and which new one is to be built and where?

    who is going to get that particular Government Job?

    How to deal with someone suspected of terrosims?

    Trade policy…. etc etc etc etc.

    It is here that real governing takes place, and the document obviously says nothing about such decisions and who will oversee them. Its fine to agree on a basic text, but as always the devil is in the detail, and the coalition document has none. Not even the 55% rule is explained properly, and thats one of the big things.

1 2 3 4 5