There is a ComRes poll out tonight. The full details are embargoed until ten o’clock, but Andrew Grice has already posted that the Conservative lead is down to seven points, from points in ComRes’s previous poll a week and a half ago.

I’ll update at ten, but certainly this poll appears to be echoing the trend we’ve seen in all the other polls since the country officially exited recession on Tuesday. So far Ipsos MORI, YouGov, BPIX and ComRes have all shown the Tory lead shrinking and heading into hung Parliament territory.

I think that Populus’s monthly poll may also have been conducted over the weekend – if it was, we should get that tonight or tomorrow as well.

UPDATE: The full figures are CON 38%(nc), LAB 31%(+2), LDEM 19%(nc), so the narrowing of the lead is down to Labour increasing their support – like YouGov, BPIX and MORI, ComRes have Labour up above 30% and in the case of ComRes it is the first time for almost exactly a year.

37% of people agreed that Labour can take credit for getting Britain out of recession (a minority – 59% disagreed – but obviously 37% is more people than actually support Labour, so is probably not a bad finding). The other additional questions aren’t particularly enlightening. 40% said they trusted Brown more than Cameron to help the economy to recover (52% disagreed, but obviously we can’t automatically stick them in the Cameron column as they may be people who trust them both, or trust neither of them). The same applies to the 24% of people who believe the recession would have ended earlier if the Tories had been in power – the 69% of people who disagreed can’t be taken to be people who think the Tories would have done worse, some will think the two parties would have done equally well or badly.

Finally 82% said they agreed that Cameron should be clearer over what he would do about the economy. The Indy have put this as a subheading on their front page, but frankly it’s a fairly pointless question. A good sign of a decent question is whether anyone can really agree with the opposite – and how many normal people would say “I think David Cameron should be much vaguer and less clear about his plans for the economy”?


167 Responses to “ComRes show Tory lead down to 7 points”

1 2 3 4
  1. There are now some Conservative supporters who are hoping that somehow, even if there is a noticeable further swing back to Labour, there won’t be in the marginals.

    Obviously it is possible for the marginals to swing more or less than the national average – we’ve seen that several times in recent elections – but I think that there’s a limit to how great this differential will be. People who live in marginals aren’t a different species from those who live in safe Labour or Conservative seats. If the national swing to the Conservatives were to decline to, say, 4 or 4.5%, it would be unrealistic for it to be as high as, say, 8% in the (semi-)marginals.

  2. @ Alec

    I completely agree with all your points, especially the dreadful Tory games in NI, which I have also blogged about here. If that frightens people not to vote Tory it would be all to the good in this case, because it is frightening.

    But, more generally, if this GE did lead to the Tories going down in confusion then I – though a non-Tory – would fear the loss of what started out looking like a Christian Democrat-style, civilised, modernising project for a party that had ossified, but would in the end be in danger of bequeathing charge of the Party to Georg Haider-style xenophobes.

    I like your point about Brown soldiering on regardless – in keeping with the worst as well as best aspects of his complex personality. Reminds me a bit of Major in 1992: indomitable against all the naysayers, and ultimately triumphant, which Brown could yet be, in terms of seats at any rate.

    However, Labour is flat at 30/31, LD are flat at 19, and none of the last 10 polls show the Tories above 40, four putting them in the upper 30s. The next Populus poll (today?) is I think from the only remaining outfit not to have reported since its previous poll gave the Tories over 40, in their case 41 on 10 January.

    So, it will be especially interesting to see if they buck, confirm, or intensify the current small downward Tory trend, and whether Labour and the LDs move either way. But, whatever its findings, it will still only be ONE poll.

  3. There has been a definite trend away from the Tories for the past month and it is difficult to pinpoint just why that should be. I sense that the anger in the country regarding the economy, MP’s expenses and Afghanistan has abated…as has the hysteria about immigration. In recent local byelections the BNP has seen a notable fall in support, thankfully. A sign that the ‘race issue’ is no longer big news. If you add Cameron’s obvious limitations, the Tories shamble of a policy for the economy and their promise to repeal the hunting ban, it becomes a little clearer as to why their support is beginning to wane. [snipped – read the comments policy please – AW]

  4. @Barnaby JL Marder

    There are now some Conservative supporters who are hoping that somehow, even if there is a noticeable further swing back to Labour, there won’t be in the marginals.

    ————————-

    True. But there could be an element of truth in their expectation.

    i. Voters in marginals are more heavily targetted. And the Conservatives have much more money to burn on publicity than Labour.

    ii. In my opinion, voters in marginals are more inclined to stay ‘switched’ once they have switched alleigance. So marginal voters who voted Labour last time, if they have decided to vote Conservative this time, are harder to win back (for Labour) than voters in non-marginals.

    “People who give up smoking are more zealously anti-smoking than those who never smoked”.

    Of course the second point is just my feeling. I have no evidence for that.

  5. Anthony –

    “I’m not making any predictions.”

    That’s exactly what I predicted you would say :)

  6. Anthony Wells

    Have you by any chance seen the “Worcester Woman” survey for Red magazine that David Maddox is pushing in his `She’s smart, she’s savvy and she could decide general election – Worcester Woman’s back´ in the Scotsman at http://news.scotsman.com/politics/She39s-smart-she39s-savvy-and.6033087.jp ?

    As usual, he’s trying to make bricks without straw from the meaningless “Scotlandshire” sub-sample, but a real poll of 2000 such ladies on a GB basis might be interesting.

    The details don’t seem to be available on any of the main pollsters’ websites and, as usual with Maddox, none is quoted in his “article”.

  7. Brownedov –

    Paul Waugh suggested it had been carried out by someone called Demographic (the sort of name for a research company that renders you completely ungoogleable. )

    So no idea if it’s anything meaningful

  8. Amber Star

    **How will the CONs react? Climb aboard the bandwagon, or vote against in parliament?
    What do you chaps think? **

    My guess is the Conservatives will condemn Labour for ‘’fiddling’’ the voting system.
    They will vote against in Parliament because they will say FPTP has ‘’served them or the country well’’ & it ensures strong government.

    Labour will respond by saying the Cons are out of touch and backward looking and AV is fairer.

    Btw Can anyone tell us how the marginal’s are doing – in light of the recent polls?

  9. Anthony Wells

    Thanks for the info. Maddox promoting it should have been warning enough.

    “ungoogleable” – lovely word and quite so.

  10. Anthony

    I do apologise – should have addressed my question to you :-)

    Do you know how the marginals are panning out in view of the recent polls?

  11. The tory high command wasn’t for doing any deals with DUP. All 18 candidates will be tory and UUP.

    Tories would never do a DUP deal. The media has the knives out for Cameron.

  12. Al J – Short answer is no. Normal polls can’t tell us anything about how the marginals are behaving in comparison to other seats.

  13. The Tories have the Budget to look forward too. That will hurt Labour.

    If we slip back in to negative growth on 26th April (ish) then the game is up.

    It’s worth remembering that the ending of the recession was supposed to be the big danger for the Tories.

    Labour are still barely above 30% and the detailed marginal polling suggests a good Tory majority.

  14. Funny how noone has a problem with the DUP voting with Labour but the idea of the DUP being involved with the Tories is a big deal. Clearly someone has got better negotiating and presentational skills and clearly it isn’t Owen Patterson. One can understand the DUP being a little bit reluctant to give policing powers to a group the BBC have on record as being involved in trying to murder supporters of the DUP.
    The Tories seem to have a problem that the voters aren’t voting on whether David Cameron is a nicer man than Gordon Brown but who would make the more effective leader of the country Cameron’s deals in NI don’t give the impression of strong leadership. He needs to show the bullying side of his nature.

  15. ” The very idea that a mainland political party should consider formal alliance with one side of the sectarian divide in NI is an outrageous risk, when for three decades and throughout all kinds of idealogical divides, Tories and labour have been at one over the most serious long term security issue faced by the UK”

    Well, that is something they haven’t been. Labour has been allied to the SDLP for years, and promoted a United Ireland by consent (somehow) up till 1996.

    There’s nothing odd about the Conservatives supporting Unionism, given that they’re a Unionist party. Any more than it’s odd that Fianna Fail should support Irish Nationalism,

    But your point certainly demonstrates how poor Conservative media-management has been recently. They’ve allowed a non-issue to damage them.

    “There are now some Conservative supporters who are hoping that somehow, even if there is a noticeable further swing back to Labour, there won’t be in the marginals.”

    The swing in the marginals is not going to be *that* different from the overall swing. But a difference of even 1% may make a big difference in terms of seat outcomes. Something like a third of Labour MPs in marginal seats are standing down, to be replaced by relative unknowns. Of itself, that could produce a differential swing.

  16. @sunbeam

    “The Tories have the Budget to look forward too. That will hurt Labour”

    Agreed, though rather like PBR- with a brief dip then a recovery. But- and this is important- it will set out the minutiae of public spending department-by-department and that means Cameron and Osborne will have to pick that gauntlet up and set out the Tories detailed plans. That will hurt them also….if they have them. If they don’t have plans as detailed as Darlings that will hurt them even more.

    “If we slip back in to negative growth on 26th April (ish) then the game is up. ”

    I don’t know of any independent economists who are predicting that but it would be a disaster for Brown and Darling if it did happen: though it would also give extra credence to the Cable narrative about not cutting in 2010-2011. This occurrence would actually be difficult for the Tories as well- only real winner from this- if it happened- I can see are the LD’s.

  17. I still think it will be a victory for the Tories but only just. Maybe along the lines of the 1992 majority of 22.

    Cameron is not doing himself any favours at the moment. Perhaps someone should send him a cushion beacuse the amount of time he spends sitting on the fence his backside must be sore by now!

    I am still surprised and a bit dissappointed that the Lib Dems are not doing better against Labour.

  18. @Sunbeam

    Please share with us this ‘detailed marginal polling’ whose existence Anthony denies but that suggests to you ‘a good Tory majority’.

    The marginals that the Tories would need to win for a good working majority are on their target list at about positions 125 -145. In other words, the seats beyond the 125 gains that would achieve a bare majority. They’d need to win most of these, as they cannot be sure of winning every single one of nos. 001-125.

    We can be confident that there will be greatly varying regional swings, plus differential swings depending on their main opponents – Labour, LD, Plaid, SNP. It was widely rumoured last month, for example, that Tory private polling was predicting as few as half a dozen net gains from the Lib Dems, rather than the 20+ that uniform national swings had been indicating – and that was when the Tories were 2-3% more buoyant in the polls. There’s no way of judging that one.

    The fact is we simply cannot tell what is going on unless we get large and statistically robust, individual constituency polls in a big sample of Tory target constituencies, at least 25 from within the group 75-145, I guess (but I am really guessing).

    Who will be doing that amount of expensive work all the way through to polling day, apart from the Tories themselves of course? And they’ll naturally be keeping the findings to themselves.

  19. Wolf Macneill, we’ve had two recent surveys in Labour-held marginals which do point to bigger than average swings. Angus Reid will also be publishing such a survey in the next few days.

    But, I think we’d want a few more before coming to any firm conclusions.

  20. @Sean Fear – accept your point re Lab/SDLP, but the key factor here is an opposition party, likely to soon enter government, discussing in secret – although denying discussions took place- unifying with the unionist parties at a time when there are extremely delicate negoatiations over the very future of Stormont. In about 18 weeks time cameron could well be sitting across the table from martin McGuiness trying to rescue a peace process that has been a great success for both Tories and Labour. Are you seriously trying to tell me what the Tory front benchers have done is nothing more than a bit of poor media management?

    @Sunbeam – “It’s worth remembering that the ending of the recession was supposed to be the big danger for the Tories.” It may well still be. Look at the economic confidence numbers, now rising sharply, and look at the front page of todays FT. Manufacturing exports are rising at their fastest rate ever, with manufacturing activcity as a whole at a 15 year high. Surveys indicate this sector is now in positive recruitment again. This is the ideal way to grow out of the recession and debt problems, and suggests Q1 figures could be better then anticipated. There are also alot of manufacturing heavy marginals in places like the west midlands. Tory economic policy is also getting increasingly confused. Cameron made much of the Office of Budgetary Responsibility, but now it’s the bank of England who will decide spending levels. They are going to retain the 2% CPI target, when this was the cause of the problem in the first place – only targeting consumer prices, not asset and credit bubbles. Today Osborne has in fact been less clear than Darling over what his spending strategy will be.
    There is very little time left, and Brown has an awful lot of residual anger to overcome, but I sincerely believe that if the election was 6 months and not 3 month hence Cameron would be toast.

  21. Every marginal is different though. It’s not just that there are Lab-LD ones, Lab-Con ones and Con-LD ones (leaving aside Celtic Britain and oddities like Brighton Pavillion), it’s that their demographics are far from homogenous. Warrington South is different from Ipswich, and both of whom are hugely different from Poplar and Limehouse, but all would fall on roughly the same uniform swing from Labour to the Tories.

    You’d therefore need to poll each different type – Kent supermarginals, London commuter belt, midland marginals, northern marginals, Lib Dem northern targets, south-west marginals…

    It’s unlikely anybody will pay for that and display the results publically. Polling of relevant social groups will almost certainly be combined with demographics to produce rough estimates, but even the parties probably won’t poll every single permutation.

    In addition, Angus Reid’s contribution will be problematic, as their weighting produces notably different results to that used by everybody else. They could be right that Labour have a ceiling of 24, but if that’s the case then the Tory majority will be well over 100, so marginals don’t matter. And if they’re wrong, that makes their marginal figures hard to use without inputting some kind of obscenely hard to justify adjustment to the numbers.

  22. “Are you seriously trying to tell me what the Tory front benchers have done is nothing more than a bit of poor media management? ”

    Certainly. No one expects the Irish government to be neutral in such negotiations, so why should the Conservatives be?

  23. Alec,

    Surveys based on economic confidence have been consistently more optimistic than recorded growth in output – which has disappointed continuously throughout this recession.

    Given that manufacturing output is now far lower than it was 15 years ago, that doesn’t seem much to write home about.

  24. I expect Sunbeam means earlier polls of marginals.

    Al J asked me about recent polls, and there haven’t been any recent published polls of marginal seats. If you go back a bit there has been some though.

  25. Anthony makes a good point about the wording of the economic question in this poll. All the same, many respondents would understand the symbolic importance of this question, and it is striking that even many Tory supporters must have agreed with it.

    The decreasing Tory lead should be particularly worrying for them because it has come at a time when they are campaigning more actively than Labour, specifically in relation to their billboard campaign.

    Given that Others includes regional parties, SNP and Plaid, and that many smaller parties will only stand in selected seats, recent polls, in which most movement appears to between Others and major parties, need to be taken with care. The trends, which seem to be small but consistent over several polls, may hide considerable difference between different seats.

    The Tory billboard campaign seems to have picked on a Labour/Conservative issue, the NHS, and implicitly criticises the Government. It is far from obvious that this is the right tactic when the Tories need to prevent votes drifting away to UKIP (see recent posts by myself and others for Cameron’s Witney seat) and when in order to get an overall majority the Conservatives need to exploit the LibDems currently largely stagnant position in the polls by picking up the considerable number of seats in which they are close behind the LibDems (see discussion e.g. for Southport).

    The bottom line is that given the current condition of the UK the Conservatives really ought to be doing better by comparison with psephological history. So, come to that, should the LibDems.

  26. @Sean Fear – “Surveys based on economic confidence have been consistently more optimistic than recorded growth in output – which has disappointed continuously throughout this recession”

    Two points. Firstly, I’m not sure they have. Given that GDP figures take three years to finalise, we can’t yet say this. In the majority of cases recently the revisions from first estimates have been upwards, sometimes very substantially so. Many economists are also beginning to think that measures of public opinion and purchasing patterns are in fact a better way to measure traditional forward economic indicators. Google search pattern analysis was more effective at predicting the recession than GDP figures. Secondly, what does it matter? Voters make their mind up on their own experiences, not some technical measure of the gross national economic performance. So what if they are ‘wrong’ if that is what they believe at the time. At present voters are becoming increasingly confident, and that is what swings votes.

    On your last point, of course there has been a long term and historic decline in manufacturing which predates this government (and the one before that). That’s not the point. If manufacturing is expanding at its fastest rate for 15 years and is taking on workers now it means falling unemployment and increasing government revenue. Just accept it as good news, if not for the government then for the folks who might have the chance to get back into work.

  27. Are we getting a populus poll tonight?

    Also, what are people thinking of Angus Reid – could everyone else be getting it wrong?

  28. Down Wolf.

    I did mean earlier polls, Anthony. The recent one in the NotW suggested a comfortable Tory majority. As have the old PoliticalHome ones of a good while ago.

    @ Rob Sheppard – how will the economy do after a VAT rise and a [so far] bad winter? Negative growth is hardly much of a decline from 0.1% growth.

    The Tories certainly seem to be going thru a rough trot. Is it a blip? Probably but they are pretty poor right now.
    However, once they dust of the posters of Brown with the words – ‘Do you want 5 more years………’

  29. Anthony

    Thanks for your answer.

    The next poll on marginals will be very telling.

  30. Barnaby and others re marginals.
    The most recent survey I recall showed a 8.3% swing as opposed to the average at the time of 6.5% UNS in marginals needing a 4-10% swing the assumption being seat needing 4% or less are certain con gains from Labour. NOTW, ICM Jan 23rd in the archive)
    I have suggested earlier that the increase in marginals versus UNS is exponential so if the UNS swing increases by 20% to 7.8% expect at least 20% extra in marginals to 9.96% – a higher delta by 0.4 near enough, This could be even higher.
    But this works in reverse so a 20% drop in UNS swing to 5.2 would be at least 20% in marginals narrowing the delta by 0.4 – again this may be more.

    As such as the polls narrow (if they do further) expect the marginal premium to narrow.

    Also as LD’s wil probably hold more than UNS projects the Cons have to go deeper and as Wolf has suggested some ‘more marginal’ Con targets from labour will be held for specfic reasons.

    Still this will be irrelevant if the overall lead does not fall a bit more.

  31. @ Frederic Stansfield ‘The bottom line is that given the current condition of the UK the Conservatives really ought to be doing better by comparison with psephological history. So, come to that, should the LibDems’.

    I think I understand your point about the Tories: for their own electoral prospects, they need to be further ahead at this stage. So, using 1992 as an example, the Labour opposition, having led the widely written-off Tories in the polls by a mile for a long time, were only (on average) 2% ahead on 11 March when John Major, defending a majority of almost 90, called the election; on 8 April, Labour went on to lose it by 7.6%. Your message seems to be: Cameron beware!

    However, I’m not sure what you are trying to say about the Lib Dems’ current standing. They seem to have been on c.19% for a while. I’m sure they’d rather be on the 22.1 they achieved on election day in 2005. Unless they now screw up, they are more likely than not to get closer to that figure over the next couple of months, as increasing media coverage, and their own doorstep campaigning, gradually raise their profile. But, given the far more equal broadcast media coverage which must kick in when Brown names the day, they are most likely to peak late in the official campaign as they have done ever since they were formed.

    Here’s what happened to them in the elections from 1992-2005:

    1992: average poll standing on day election called (APSDEC): 15.2 Election result (ER): 18.3
    1997: APSDEC: 12.5; ER: 17.2
    2001: APSDEC: 12.7; ER: 18.3
    2005: APSDEC: 19.5; ER: 22.1

    Note that even in 1992, in their first GE after the SDP+ Lib merger, and with the spectre of ‘hung parliament’ being threatened by both the ‘Big Two’, they still bettered their initial campaign standing by 3%.

    Note also that LDs study and remember their electoral history the way that Labour and the Tories remember their time in office. It’s all they’ve got. And it explains in part while they’re currently sounding so confident about the 2010 GE outcome.

  32. @jim Jam – your analysis is interesting. I suppose almost by definition, a facet of marginals is that voters swing. (No, not like that). Everyone assumes there is a fixed marginal premium for the Tories, but this assumes the marginal swing voters who have swung already are completely fixed in their voting intention now and will not swing back. Intuitively, although not backed up by any scientific evidence, it might be possible to argue that swing voters are more likely to swing back if the tide turns.

  33. [Snipped – sorry Alec, I know it wasn’t your intent to be partisan, but it was a post that boiled down to “look, the Conservatives have done something rubbish”, and it naturally provoked other posts defending them which I’ve also moderated – AW]

  34. @Alec

    In this case, I think that the Lib Dem +3% campaigning gain trend will counter any ‘Conservatives are doing better in the marginals’ effect. Both because it’ll dampen that substantialy, but also because of the tendancy for at last 2% tactical voting in the Lib Dem favour.

  35. My main reasoning is the voters in marginals are more likely to be affected than elsewhere by time for a change and other messages and therefore more likely to vote hence the swing will be bigger there than UNS.
    Should the gap narrow ,therefore, then the underlying factors (more scrutiny of the cons perhaps) will also have more impact leading to a narrowing of the marginal swing premium.

  36. Ben –

    I thought there might have been, but I’ve heard nothing so my guess is I got the wrong end of the stick and it’s going to be done over next weekend.

  37. Anthony
    I have posted in response to this from ALEC :-

    “Tory economic policy is also getting increasingly confused. Cameron made much of the Office of Budgetary Responsibility, but now it’s the bank of England who will decide spending levels. They are going to retain the 2% CPI target, when this was the cause of the problem in the first place – only targeting consumer prices, not asset and credit bubbles. Today Osborne has in fact been less clear than Darling over what his spending strategy will be.”

    Alec’s post has not been snipped-my response is in moderation.

    I don’t understand.

  38. Anthony-the post in question from Alec was at 3.06pm today-it is still there.

    My post in response was at 7.05pm today-it’s still in moderation.

  39. Also, what are people thinking of Angus Reid – could everyone else be getting it wrong?

    ————————–

    the on printed paper worth not are they.

  40. Colin – sorry, but it was a post getting into a debate with Alec about whether Conservative economic policy was any good or not… and this is not a venue for party political debate.

    As I said yesterday, things have slipped too far towards silly partisan comments, so I’m moderating harshly for a bit.

    Don’t take that to mean that you or Alec are particular culprits, neither of you are at all, but if I let through comments like that it encourages people who do just want to point score off the other side.

  41. Anthony – apologies for the rant – quite right of you to snip it.

  42. ANTHONY
    “Colin – sorry, but it was a post getting into a debate with Alec about whether Conservative economic policy was any good or not”

    No -with great respect Anthony it was not.

    I considered ALEC’s version of GO’s speech incorrect-I gave the actual quotes to prove it. I expressed no opinion on them.

    ALECS’s opinion that “Tory economic policy is also getting increasingly confused” was allowed by you-it’s still there.
    I posted the opinions of a number of British Industrialists who expressed a different opinion today-you disallowed that-its still in moderation.

    Please explain to me how it is possible to correct misquotes & partial quotes on UKPR.

    If it is not, then I fail to understand the basis of your “impartiality”

  43. With respect Colin – you don’t know how many posts get moderated because only the poster can see it.

    Also I suggest you accept Anthony’s decision out of respect for his right to moderate in any way he sees fit.

    Thanks ;-)

  44. ALJ

    I don’t need to.
    I am sure Anthony would wish us all to feel that his manifest right to moderate is excercised even handedly

    I am asking why my correction of ALEC’s description of a speech by GO is disallowed, when the factual errors & omissions in that description are allowed.

    I am asking why an opinion by ALEC on “THe Tories economic policy”-the very thing Anthony wishes not to have debated is allowed -and yet I am not allowed to point to contrary opinions by Industrialists.

    Not my opinions-my post expressed none.

    I love reading this site-and enjoyed posting on it but I amnow totally confused at the way impartiality is administered on it.

  45. Anthony

    Unlike some, it seems, I haven’t got the time to spend all day monitoring this message board but I do have a look a couple of times a day and I have to say that I find it very irritating that a fair numbers of comments appear to be interchange between a limited number of people which often descends into partisanship or quasi-partnership – this then seems to involve intervention by yourself. It may be irrational on my part, but it puts me off posting as I feel it’s a waste of time given the undercurrent of off topic sniping.

  46. Oh come on Colin. I think arguing with Anthony is like arguing with the ref when you’ve been shown a red card. Things are going to hot up as the election draws nearer. Maybe we’ll end up with a sin bin!

    Valerie :-0

  47. I find it odd how Labour can claim credit (and be given it by a substaintial minority of people) for getting the UK out of recession but blame the “global environment” for entering the recession. They cannot have it both ways. The rest of the industralised world left recession last summer and we were at least 1 quarter late. DOesn`t alter the fact that boom and bust was not cancelled by GB.

    April will be interesting when Q1 GDP is released, especially if it shows a contraction.

  48. Colin.

    Because this place began as a site for discussion of polls and implications. Over the last 12 / 24 months much of it has become a more common-and lesser- party political brawl site. I’ve even indulged.

    Anthony- as it is his site – is allowed to do what he likes especially with party political whinges. Party comments should not actually exist here at all. Those who dont like party comments being dealt with can find somewhere else to make their complaints. Except where Anthony opens his ‘free for all comments politcial brawl comments’ thread…

  49. colin
    For :-0 read :-)

    Valerie

  50. testing

1 2 3 4