Support for the government’s handling of the outbreak remains high. While it has declined from an initial peak, far more people think the government are handling the issue well than badly (YouGov’s latest tracker has 58% saying the government are doing well, Opinium has 48% approve/36% disapprove). This is equally reflected in the voting intention polls where the Conservatives are steadily around 50% and in Boris Johnson’s own personal approval ratings, which YouGov has at 66% doing well. Collectively these are extremely impressive figures for a government.

However, look further down and there are signs of weakness in the foundations. There are several, important areas where the public view the government’s handling very negatively. Opinium have found people disapprove of how the government have handled both testing and the provision of PPE. At the start of the month YouGov found that 67% thought the government had prepared badly for the possibility of a pandemic and 62% thought lockdown had been introduced too late. MORI also found 66% thought the government had acted too late. Compared to other countries, people think that the British government has performed worse than the governments of Germany, South Korea, Australia, France, Spain… the only country’s government perceived as doing worse than our own is the USA. Put together that looks like a narrative of failure.

How do we square these two sets of figures? Why do people think the government are doing well, despite also thinking they’ve handled some of the key areas poorly and got some of the most important decisions wrong? My own explanation is that we may be seeing an unusual amount of public goodwill towards the government – a willingness to give them the benefit of the doubt, accept that they are doing their best under incredibly difficult circumstances. Normally we are very cynical towards our politicians, but right now it may be that people are more willing to trust their motives, to want them to succeed.

It’s also worth noting that, even if the public think the government haven’t always performed capably during the crisis, right now there is strong public backing for their direction of approach. The public are strongly in favour of the lockdown and the government are pursuing a policy of lockdown. Therefore, the public approve. The British public have been extremely pro-lockdown since early in the crisis – back in March, the public were ahead of the government in supporting further restrictions and they remain supportive of it.

Back at the end of March I pondered how long the high levels of public support for lockdown would last once it was actually in place and impacting people’s lives, and how the government would fare if they got to the point that the public were clambering for relaxation. So far it appears to have lasted just fine, and it is possible that the government may have to face the alternative problem – how to start loosening the lockdown when the public are nervous of it.

Right now there is little public appetite for a weakening of the lockdown. A YouGov/SkyNews poll on Friday found only 15% thought it would be right to start relaxing the lockdown now. A Deltapoll survey for the Sun on Sunday today found only 12% of people thought the government should start ending the lockdown in the next week.

That is not to say that whatever Boris Johnson announces tonight will be unpopular (the questions above did not specify particular ways of weakening the rules, so I expect respondents assumed some sort of substantial weakening of the rules, rather than the extremely minor relaxations which seem more likely at this point). However, there are problems ahead. Sooner or later lockdown needs to be unwound, and it remains to be seen how united public opinion will be behind the timing for that.

It will also be interesting to see what the levels of public support for the government look like afterwards. Their present high levels of approval may be the result of backing for lockdown, or a general willingness of people to give the government the benefit of the doubt during a crisis. Whatever the reason it will pass, and only then will we be really be able to see whether, looking back in hindsight, the government are seen to have successfully led the country through a difficult time of crisis, or as a government that bungled its response.


4,715 Responses to “On why the public support the Government’s handling of the virus”

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  1. @Danny

    Yes indeed. When it comes to immunity in this context, what particularly matters is your ability to infect others.

    And if you have antibodies, that can be ONE way in which you might keep from being reinfected, and hence keep from becoming infectious to others.

    But there are potentially other ways. So, if your innate system cleared the virus up so effectively you didn’t produce antibodies, that doesn’t necessarily mean that lacking antibodies you will necessarily become infectious again.

    Because your innate system may be further primed to resist infection.

    And even if you do get infected again, it may be so primed that it clears it up before you become infectious to others.

    Or maybe you only become minimally infectious, such that R0 is less than unity, so the virus dies out.

    And then you have the contribution of prior partial immunity due to T cells memory left from when you had a cold. Again, even if this doesn’t stop you getting infected, it might mean you are not very infectious.

    Basically, you have to map all the potential vectors. And it struck me early on, the modellers tended to talk maths, but not biochemistry and mechanisms of immunity. I’m not sure how much biochemistry Epidemiologists do, so I decided to go have a gander for myself.

  2. TOH

    @”I can agree with that, but I think how the UK has responded to the pandemic will also be reflected in how history sees his premiership.”

    Certainly-and that looks difficult for him at present.

  3. @Danny

    When it comes to mapping ALL the vectors, we’ve mentioned some more, like the possibility of improved hygiene etc. driving down infectivity and R0.

    But it’s also possible that things like awareness of the need for more Vitamin D might play a part too, replenishing immune system levels.

    (This is a pandemic in an era when we can share information in detail, and don’t have to rely on what the Graun dish up!)

  4. @Turk

    “However when Labour MP Kinnock drives 150 miles from Wales to London to sing happy birthday to his parent at the height of the virus not a word.”

    Didn’t even know about that. Sack him too.

  5. COLIN

    I agree, it would appear some of the scientific advice with hindsight has been poor.

  6. Bias tends to come out inadvertently so a head shake or laugh for example.
    Or Laura Kuenssberg talking about market interference rather than the appropriately neutral market intervention, using correction would have been inadvertently biased the other way.

  7. CHRISLANE1945

    “I think, at the very least, the honeymoon with ‘BJ’ has ended and Labour is back in the game, which will make for good politics and polling, which I hope will once again become the focus of UKPR soon.”

    I have always regarded it important to have an good opposition, if nothing else it keeps government on it’s toes. As to the honeymoon I think i actually posted that wa ending before the Cummings affair blew up. I agree that labour are back in the game but I still think the Tories will win the next GE, just “gut feel” although I have a very mixed record on election results.

    “………..which I hope will once again become the focus of UKPR soon.”

    We can certainly agree on that.

  8. ” I still think the Tories will win the next GE, just “gut feel” although I have a very mixed record on election results.”

    If the Tories are able to make Brexit look like a success and deliver for ‘red wall’ constituencies before 2024, then it is almost a certainty that they will win. Pretty big ‘ if’ though.

  9. BARDIN1

    I think we all understand one another. No need to continue now I suggest.

  10. SOMERJOHN

    @”you seem to feel that there is no fundamental divide between free market globalists and protectionist go-it-aloners in the government or Tory party.
    I can’t really see how it’s possible to craft a trade policy for brexit Britain without going down one of those routes,”

    When I read questions like that I sometimes wonder if I’m missing something really fundamental-or being naive-or simply poorly informed.

    I can only say that I don’t understand why a “trade policy” has to be one of those two extreme positions.

    I am one of those simple souls who actually believed “Take Back Control” was what it was all about. I certainly worried about the downsides, but gave up in the end as the Referendum Campaign descended into uninformative slanging .

    So what I hope for is a Government which assesses the balance of advantage in any new Trade Agreement it proposes . I expect Trade Agreement negotiations to involve the interests of both parties of course; and those interests ( or some of them) may be perceived by one or both of the parties as mutually exclusive.

    What I anticipate is what I presume usually happens-a search for mutual advantage. Both parties being convinced that , on balance, the agreement is a net advantage to them both.

    It will then be for our Government to convince Parliament, and voters, that a net advantage to UK is demonstrable.

    If it isn’t -for example because a significant domestic sector feels exposed to unfair competition ; or because a significant domestic sector feels denied an export opportunity-then Parliament -and ultimately voters will adjudicate.

    I expect you find that far too vague & theoretical ? Not doctrinal enough ?

    But it is the only way I can think of to answer your question.

  11. Statgeek

    “However when Labour MP Kinnock drives 150 miles from Wales to London to sing happy birthday to his parent at the height of the virus not a word.”

    Didn’t even know about that.

    Exactly.

    I also think it public interest for people to be aware as Starmer isn’t sacking him like he said he would Cummings. The hypocrisy on this is immense. I’m all up for having a one size fits all – “all breaks equals a sacking”; but it needs to be sack all that break the rules because they break the rules not because they are Dominic Cummings.

  12. Statgeek

    “However when Labour MP Kinnock drives 150 miles from Wales to London to sing happy birthday to his parent at the height of the virus not a word.”

    Didn’t even know about that.

    Exactly.

    I also think it public interest for people to be aware as Starmer isn’t sacking him like he said he would Cummings. The hypocrisy on this is immense. I’m all up for having a one size fits all – “all breaks equals a sacking”; but it needs to be sack all that break the rules because they break the rules not because they are Dominic Cummings.

  13. Today`s Travelling Tabby numbers of new cases had me pondering on infection routes. How much transmission results from groceries, letters, objects, parcels, being moved, or is all or most virus infection via people?

    This ought to have been estimated by now, a difficult study I realise, and will become more important as Covid19 thins down.

    Have health ministers asked for this information, and has Sage reported?

    On my totting up the TT numbers, a third of the land area of Scotland has had less than 10 total new cases in the last 10 days. Orkney is the most interesting to me – the first new case there today during May. And on adjacent Shetland no cases since 1 May, despite numerous early infections there.

    Tracing should tell us how this new Orkney case has happened, and if it doesn`t, then many precautions shouldn`t be relaxed yet.

    If I was living in Dingwall, Portree, Stornoway and Thurso, I wondering about checks on travellers going north and west, at Fort William and the Kessock Bridge.

  14. CB11

    I liked that letter to Mike Deness!

  15. @CBX1985

    I do think Starmer should remove him from the Shadow Cabinet. Not that it makes much difference but this did happen before Starmer was elected leader, and was apologised for.

    But the ‘what would the people say; antennae ought to be telling him to be firm on his own side

  16. @Davwell – can’t answer that, but I can say that experts are now expressing concern that the police in England will not have the legal power to enter a property to check on people gathering in gardens.

    I’m beginning to winder just who has drawn up these guidelines, because they really do seem to be very hamfisted.
    My fear is that England is going to start to see case numbers edging up. I don’t think we’ve got infections down far enough before we started to unlock, we’ve unlocked in a chaotic manner, and we don’t have the track and trace capability in place.

  17. Just getting a “Welcome Back” message from 38 Degrees.

    Maybe that is because I didn`t sign 10 plus messages from them in the last 2/3 days asking me to condemn DC or BJ on the affair, or write to my local MP.

  18. @Davwel

    “Today`s Travelling Tabby numbers of new cases had me pondering on infection routes. How much transmission results from groceries, letters, objects, parcels, being moved, or is all or most virus infection via people?

    This ought to have been estimated by now, a difficult study I realise, and will become more important as Covid19 thins down.

    Have health ministers asked for this information, and has Sage reported?”

    ——-

    It can be tricky getting the data, but yes, I’m not sure the powers that be were pushing it enough early on.

    There were lots of studies done by researchers but often not representative.

    A related issue to routes of infection, is also that of viral load.

    We don’t know for sure yet if it applies to Covid 19, but for some other viruses the initial dose can impact how badly you suffer with a virus.

    And so for example it is possible that one might become infected by touching something, but get a mild dose. Or maybe get a big dose….

  19. On the whole I think Kinnock should have resigned/been asked to.

    The Scottish Health Officer – it was more clear cut than Kinnock because she was making daily press conferences telling people to stay home and then didn’t do so herself.

    Nesbitt the assembly member in NI was chair of a committee unrelated to health (I said it was the health committee, but that turned out to be wrong). He did resign ; his party leader is the health minister so in a way important that he do so, probably more so than Kinnock.

    The Tory MP who went by train while having Covid; I think this was very wrong from a public health perspective. I think isolating in London at the room he was renting until he was better, while not ideal fro his own perspective, would have been the better option. Volunteers would have supplied him with food.

  20. Colin: I can only say that I don’t understand why a “trade policy” has to be one of those two extreme positions.

    Many thanks for your considered response. I’m not going to respond in any detail. The reason is that we’ll probably struggle to have a constructive dialogue on this because our minds clearly work in different ways and that creates too great a likelihood of misunderstanding. As TOH pointed out, I’m a sensitive soul.

    One general point, though. I do think a government needs an underlying economic philosophy if it is to achieve coherence and consistency. But I accept that you prefer what I would call a suck-it-and-see approach, and you might call pragmatic realism, informed by taking back control and the judgement of parliament.

  21. It hit me earler: in one way at least this rather radical government has proved itself to be truly conservative. It has revived an ancient English tradition not previously seen in this country for for 60 years…

    Comedians by the name of Hancock.

  22. @OldNat

    “I liked that letter to Mike Deness!”

    A bit cruel but undoubtedly very funny. Denness was a fine opening batsmen for Kent, but like most of the England side who bumped into the ferocious Aussie bowling attack (Lillee and Thomson) on that 74/75 tour Down Under, he wilted and, as captain, took the brunt of the criticism for the trouncing. After dropping himself for the 4th Test, he re-selected himself for the 5th when the series was already gone. In fairness to him, in a rather unusual dead rubber 6th Test at the MCG, he made a magnificent 188 and England won by an innings. We lost the series 4-1, however.

    I’ve always treasured the thought of a Scotsman skippering the England cricket team, though!

    That said, we’ve got an Irishman skippering the One Day team at the moment!

    (P.S. Gavin Hamilton, of Yorkshire CC, was another Scot who played for England at cricket, although I think only one day internationals. They call that “white ball” cricket now, I think. I’ve got little time for much of that pseudo form of cricket, especially T20. Dreadful nonsense.)

  23. Two post war excellent footballers from the Edinburgh teams Hearts and Hibs played international cricket for Scotland..are there any instances of English football players (Botham doing it in reverse order is all I can think of)?

  24. @ProfHoward

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6kPbzxWrJs

    https://twitter.com/BBCsarahsmith/status/1262664566640689154

    Apology not aired on live television, unlike the reports.

  25. @ ALEC – ?!?! I’ll again suggest you read the info. We’ve been through this before, did you forget?

    Try actually reading the report. Page 8:

    “Acute respiratory outbreaks, England

    Information on acute respiratory outbreaks is collected by PHE’s Health Protection Teams (HPTs)”

    as it always was, note the “schools” being covered since before C19 started as it is a “CONTROLLED” setting.

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/888254/COVID19_Epidemiological_Summary_w22_Final.pdf

    Maybe you don’t have kids or understand how schools communicate with parents? Those that do would know that if you get one kids with anything like nits or something else “contagious” then parents are told straight away. For C19 then you’d close the relevant “pod” with immediate effect, possibly the whole school as soon as you know of a case.

    I’ve no idea why you fail to understand this?!?

    Now above the individual school or other “controlled setting” then it is important to know, roughly, whether your area has low level of infection and R below 1. If infections and low, and falling then your area can proceed with reopenings (in this case schools)

    I’ve no idea why you fail to understand that either?!?

  26. @BARDINI

    The most famous is of course Denis Compton who played in Arsenal’s 1950 cup winning side. There are probably many others.

  27. Rishi’s tweaks and extensions on the various schemes all seem good (still a bit too generous IMO but the adjustments are all welcome)

    Great to see Faisal Islam back as well! Intelligent and appropriate questions – just what we need!

  28. Comparing Kinnock, who was also delivering essential supplies to elderly parents, to Cummings is a weak argument.

    Cummings knew he had been exposed to Coronavirus, was displaying symptoms, yet drove half way across the country. He then broke the rules again with a day out to test his eyesight.

  29. On the football and cricket question the one I think about is Willie Watson player for England at both sports , his last test was in 1959 and his last football cap was 1950. He played most of his count cricket for Yorkshire and his top flight football at Sunderland.

  30. There is also of course Chris Balderstone who captained Carlisle United in their glory days, played for Yorkshire, Leicestershire and England and then became an international umpire.

  31. Actually I think the last England cricketer to play a significant number of professional football games, almost 600, all be it not in the top flight, was Chris Balderstone. Only two England caps but caps all the same.

    He also made history as the only player to play a county cricket match and a professional football game on the same day, batting for Leicestershire During the day then driving to play for Doncaster Rovers on the same day .

  32. @ Nearlyfrench and @DaveM

    Ah – I should have remembered Compton, but didn’t know about Watson (mind you I was 3 at the time and saw both the Scottish guys play. The Hibs one (Andy Goram) was capped in both sports in the 80s, Donald Ford of Hearts was capped in the 70s for Scotland.

  33. ..oh and I meant capped for their countries in both sports!

  34. PS to 5:20pm. I’ll restate (again) that I am very concerned with NHS Test + Trace in “UNCONTROLLED” settings.

    They have a few weeks to sort out the teething problems and get turn around times on testing improved but perhaps folks have “forgotten” that if you have symptoms then you self-isolate (and then you should get yourself tested…) – you certainly don’t go to school!

    I expect different schools have sent out slightly different info but the ones i know of have all requested that anyone with symptoms reports that to the school so they can immediately take action (ie for schools then the “new” Test+Trace and the cr-app for ThaT when it comes, will make no difference to how they are planning to respond if/when they get any case in their CONTROLLED setting)

    PPS Powis touched in some related issues in his last answer but until we start seeing local outbreaks its a little unclear how extensive the local lockdown will be. For schools then shut/reopen isn’t that big a deal for businesses it will be. Some clarity on that will be important before we get to Step3.

    If folks haven’t read the info then:
    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/nhs-test-and-trace-how-it-works

    YG poll y’day showed not enough folks know how it works – sadly the presses obsession with Dom meant the “launch” info wasn’t well publicised.

  35. @Bardini/NearlyFrench

    I’m prone to diverting UKPR down sporting side roads, so I will promise that this will be my last for a bit, but I couldn’t resist the chance to indulge both my cricketing and footballing obsessions; at the same time too!

    There have been a number of dual sport cricket/football England internationals but such is the overlap of the seasons now, you have to go back in time. Nearlyfrench mentions a very famous England cricketer who played football professionally, Denis Compton, but he didn’t win any England football caps. Here’s a few who did though: –

    CB Fry (Hants/Sussex & Pompey/Saints)
    Arthur Milton (Glos and Arsenal )
    Willie Watson (Leics/Yorks & Sunderland/Huddersfield)

    Some others too but above the most famous.

    Plenty of more recent county cricketers who played professional football too – Graham Cross, Chris Baldersone, Phil Neale, Ian Botham, Jimmy Cumbes, Arnie Sidebottom, Brian Close, David Bairstow etc)

    Memories of the old days when our two grand old national sports chimed with the seasons. Put your football boots away in April and get your cricket bag out, then put the cricket bag back in the attic in late August and get your football boots out. Winter and summer sports in harmony with each other. No more, alas.

    Remarkably, though, despite the overlapping now, many thousands still play both sports and millions still love and follow them both.

    I’m one of them. Played and watched them both all my life and still do. Well, only watching now!

  36. @Crossbat1

    Thanks – I reckon Andy Goram must have been the last person to achieve that then. I’d forgotten, but although he played for Scotland at International level in both sports he was born in England

    https://www.scotsman.com/sport/cricket/andy-goram-make-one-cricket-scotland-return-1477464

    @Trevor Warne

    I agree with you re Sunak’s speech – about right I think. The only jarring bit for me was the new daily cases figure which didn’t really back up the air of optimism re where the UK is in the process. Those figures seem big to me given we are at a point where crowds are going to gather and travel to in holiday spots.

  37. Prof Howard

    Re Sarah Smith

    TOH’s equivalents in SCon, SLab and SLD praise her for “telling it as it is” (ie her interpretation of ScotGov motives) ie things they like to hear.

    On the other hand, SNP and SGP supporters see her as a mouthpiece for the Unionist establishment, who will always seek to portray a Scottish Government in the worst possible light.

    In other words – what you might expect! :-)

    However, for a journalist to become the story, instead of delivering one, is usually a sign of their failure in journalistic practice or ethics.

    Alastair Cooke only made that error at the very end of a long and distinguished career.

  38. ORB poll

    There has been no shift in opinion towards the way in which the government is handling the crisis – 40% approve while 52% disapprove – the figures from last week standing at 42% and 50% respectively.

    Furthermore, while 42% think the PM is showing leadership during the crisis, 45% think Keir Starmer is also showing leadership. This is a significant improvement for Labour compared to a month ago (22-23 April). Then, just 22% felt that the opposition would have done a better job of handling the pandemic. plus more

    https://orb-international.com/2020/05/29/covid19-uk-perceptions-and-behaviours-week-11-27-28-may/

  39. TREVOR WARNE

    “Great to see Faisal Islam back as well! Intelligent and appropriate questions – just what we need!”

    I agree, what a contrast with most of the rest of the media over the last few days.

  40. Scots sample (N=176) in th ORB poll

    UK Gov handling covid crisis well – Agree 32% : Disagree 63%

    Johnson showing leadership – Agree 29% : Disagree 44%

    Starmer showing leadership – Agree 49% : Disagree 22%

    (SLabbers shouldn’t get their hopes up. It’s basically an UK as England poll, uninterested in the leaders or opposition in other administrations).

  41. TOH

    “I agree, what a contrast with most of the rest of the media over the last few days.”

    Yes. Islam is a proper journalist – unlike Sarah Smith.

  42. JIB

    You have lost the argument, and really should move on.

    Kinnock was in fragrant breach of the rules as was Tahir Ali another Labour MP who went to a funeral with between 80 and 100 other people.

    In contrast Cummings was deemed not to have infringed the rules in driving to Durham to self isolate and at worst might have been guilty of a minor breach when he went for a drive to test his eyesight before driving back to London once he and his wife had recovered. You need to read the Police statement in full and the earlier blogging today.

  43. @ JiB 5.30 pm

    The distance travelled is of little or no importance, so long as the possibly infected person is self isolating or family isolating.

    But I find it strange that the UK government in its England remit is allowing unlimited travel, so up to 300 miles, in Scotland it`s probably up to 30 miles (which allows for very remote residences to reach services) but the Wales government is recommending only up to 5 miles.

    Wouldn`t have been so good for the farmer in whose cottage we had a holiday near Builth.

  44. OLDNAT

    Nice to agree for once.

    I cannot comment on Sarah Smith as I have no knowledge of her or what she does or says.

  45. “In contrast Cummings was deemed not to have infringed the rules in driving to Durham to self isolate and at worst might have been guilty of a minor breach when he went for a drive to test his eyesight before driving back to London once he and his wife had recovered. You need to read the Police statement in full and the earlier blogging today.”

    I don’t know why people continue to fuss over the finer details of all this, arguing over semantics and technicalities. It was only ever the optics that mattered and whether the public felt that Cummings had abused the spirit of lockdown. It appears, through polling, that there is a resounding consensus that he did and it has clearly hurt the gov in the short term. Remains to be seen if this endures though.

  46. YG Daily poll

    “Which country do you think has handled the coronavirus outbreak better between England and Scotland?”

    If I lived in Wales or NI, I’d be really annoyed that my polity was being persistently ignored, and the grammar in the YG question is dreadful!.

    https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/survey-results/daily/2020/05/29/9742c/2?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=daily_questions&utm_campaign=question_2

    England 14% : Scotland 44% : Both the same 25%

  47. JOHN33

    “I don’t know why people continue to fuss over the finer details of all this, arguing over semantics and technicalities.”

    Because a good man (IMO) was subjected to a wicked media witch hunt for no good reason.

  48. @ TW

    I think the biggest mistake being made by Sunak in the latest set of proposals is that there isn’t any room for employee sacrifice- ie all the additional costs to make up the difference end up with the employer and the only alternative choice they have is to make people redundant.

    I get the government probably can’t afford to keep paying but equally some employees would probably prefer to be paid 50% and keep their jobs for now. Again also no change to the higher limits to reflect cost of everyday living which is much lower if you aren’t working and if you can roll over mortgages etc.

    Presumably he has decided that if an employer can’t start paying something by August then they are zombie but this may not be the case and their particular market may not yet be ready to return to normal but will eventually.

    I guess he will still get the chance to change tack if the redundancy processes start mounting up middle of June and if they don’t in big numbers then it is probably me who is wrong.

  49. TOH: Cummings was deemed not to have infringed the rules in driving to Durham to self isolate and at worst might have been guilty of a minor breach when he went for a drive to test his eyesight before driving back to London once he and his wife had recovered.

    I can see that it is comforting to draw the conclusion that you do.

    However, what matters in political (and polling) terms is not the nuances of a police statement but the verdict in the court of public opinion. And that verdict seems pretty damning:

    “The king of data can spend this weekend crunching the numbers of a Daily Mail poll that found him wholly out of step with the very public he was supposedly so gifted at reading: 66% think he should quit, 63% think he should be sacked, 78% don’t believe a word of his yarn about driving to Barnard Castle to test his eyesight. The electorate are not whispering now: they’re yelling in his face.”

    Now, you can dismiss that verdict because of its source (Jonathan Freedland in the Guardian), but it isn’t your opinion or mine that counts, but that of the British people, whose judgement you have hitherto held to be sacrosanct.

  50. TOH

    ” Because a good man (IMO) was subjected to a wicked media witch hunt for no good reason.”

    A tad melodramatic. Also: ” if that means some pensioners die, too bad”. I hope that ‘ good man’ wasn’t referring to you.

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