Prorogation polling

Three polling companies – YouGov, Ipsos MORI and Survation – have so far released polling on the government’s decision to prorogue Parliament in mid-September.

YouGov polled on the issue twice – a snap poll on the day of the announcement itself, with the same question repeated overnight. The on-the-day figures were 27% acceptable, 47% unacceptable, 26% don’t know. The follow-up poll had a similar split, but with the number of don’t knows dropping off as people became aware of the story – 31% said it was acceptable, 53% unacceptable, 16% don’t know. Tabs are here)

Ipsos MORI did an unusual online poll (almost alone among pollsters these days, most of their polling is done by phone). They found 30% thought the decision to prorogue Parliament was right, 46% thought it was wrong. Tables are here.

Finally there was a Survation poll for today’s Daily Mail. This found a closer result, with the public fairly evenly split – 39% were supportive, 40% opposed (note this is rounding the totals for support/oppose after they’ve been summed, hence the apparent discrepancy with the tables). Tables are here.

Overall it looks as if the public are opposed to the prorogation decision – though it is unclear to what degree. Whether that really matters or will make any dent in the government’s support is a different matter. Opposition to prorogation is concentrated among Remainers (in YouGov 82% of Remainers think the move is unacceptable, but only 24% of Leavers, in MORI’s poll 74% of Remainers think it was wrong, only 20% of Leavers, in Survation 74% Remainers, 14% leavers). If most of the opposition to the move comes from people who are opposed to the government’s policy anyway (and I expect the more fervent opposition comes from those who were most fervently opposed already) the government are hardly likely to worry too much over losing the crucial “people who hated us anyway” vote.

Both YouGov and Survation included voting intention in their surveys:

YouGov’s topline figures were CON 33%(-1), LAB 22%(nc), LDEM 21%(+4), BREX 12%(-1), GRN 7%(-1)
Survation’s topline figures were CON 31%(+3), LAB 24%(nc), LD 21%(nc), BREX 14%(-2), GRN 3%(nc)

Changes in the YouGov poll are from a poll earlier this week, before the announcement. In Survation changes are from a poll three weeks ago. There is a little movement up and down, but certainly nothing that suggests the announcement has done immediate damage to Conservative support.


3,389 Responses to “Prorogation polling”

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  1. @John33

    No problem.

    If there is a point of bigotry, you’ll find me at the point furthest from :-)

  2. Noted!

  3. via Britain Elects

    Westminster VI

    CON: 28% (-2)
    LAB: 27% (-2)
    LDEM: 20% (+3)
    BREX: 13% (-)
    GRN: 5% (+1)

    via
    @ComRes

    Chgs. w/ 08 Sep

  4. A polychromatic panoply of polls!

  5. @Carfrew

    “…but James B already brought up the journey from Marxism to Libertarianism. (As it happens it’s not necessarily such a big leap, because there are left1e versions of Libertarianism:”

    Possibly, although I’m more drawn to Alan Bennett’s slightly more prosaic explanation that these people “have trod that dreary safari from left to right which generally comes with age…”

    Rod Liddle springs to mind, but there are many others. Maybe they were faux leftists anyway.

    @Leftieliberal

    I saw that article in the Guardian and it was interesting. As his former partner says, he would appear to be a professional contrarian and somewhat of an exhibitionist too. It takes all sorts, I suppose, but my experience of these sorts of characters is that above all else they tend be belief-free attention seekers. Impulsive too, which goes with having very little in the way of a credo or core philosophy.

    @CMJ and B&B

    Don’t all predictive polling models depend entirely on the data being inserted into the model? The O’Toole model using Survation and ComRes polling data has produced very different results to the Catmanjeff model using exclusively YouGov data. Wouldn’t it be better, although I’m not sure if it would necessarily bear much resemblance to the eventual result of a GE in two months time, to use an average of all the current polls? The BBC quoted one recently that showed the average gap between the Tories and Labour to be around 7%.

    What concerns me about the current crop of polls is the range of the Tory lead. It’s 1% to 14%. That’s very wide and suggests something is amiss to me.

  6. “There’s plenty many of us didn’t understand, and that includes Remainers, about the EU. This is because a fair amount is quite obscure and the EU doesn’t get the same scrutiny in the media.”
    @Carfrew September 14th, 2019 at 11:23 am

    Yeah, but I mean what is Commission? What is the role of the Parliament? Who are the Member States? Anything about its history. The big picture view. How does it differ from EFTA? What is EFTA and the difference between that and the EEA. And something about its history too.

    That’s the sort of thing I mean. What I would expect to be taught in schools, frankly. I appreciate the Committee of the Regions may be asking to know too much, but the big picture and its history is both fascinating and important. And the ignorance here appears to be deafening. I suppose it’s rather like our language skills; and those are dire too.

  7. From ComRes chairman

    Whose fault will it be if UK unable to get deal by 31 Oct? 38% say Boris (for offering false promises), 39% say Corbyn & Remain MPs (for undermining UK neg position) @ComResfor Sunday Express

  8. A plethora of polls;

    Independent poll

    Con 31
    Lab 27
    LD 19
    BP 13

    3-6 Sept – BMG

  9. HIRETON
    “Swinson is clearly happy to take the Lib Dems to the right as the Tories swing hard right.”

    And take them to the right in the American social conservative sense if the parliamentary track record of the last two recruits on symbolic LGBT issues is anything to go by.

    Is it possible to be too homophobic for Jo’s LibDems?

  10. @OldNat

    “via Britain Elects

    Westminster VI

    CON: 28% (-2)
    LAB: 27% (-2)
    LDEM: 20% (+3)
    BREX: 13% (-)
    GRN: 5% (+1)

    via
    @ComRes

    Chgs. w/ 08 Sep”

    So the Tory lead is anything between 1% and 12%. I’m glad that’s clear.

  11. RAF

    “the Tory lead is anything between 1% and 12%”

    Or, given MOE, perhaps no Tory lead at all?

    I remain of the opinion that the weighting factors used by most pollsters are no longer adequate to discern the factors that currently distinguish different voting tendencies.

    More succinctly described – most of them are rubbish (but we don’t know which, if any, aren’t)

  12. As above the BXP+Cons of 50% was not supported by the 2 later polls which has 41% and 44%.

    All within MOE of that 45% that has been around for a couple of months.

    Maybe my bias but I expect a drop from that 45% level as Remain DK firms up with a consequential proportionate drop in the aggregate VI for those on the leave side.

  13. A random number generator of polls. (But don’t tell Dom; he’ll probably spread the word that it’s Poles).

  14. The Independent’s report on that BMG poll of opinion in GB on whether the Scots and Northern Irish should be “permitted” [1] to determine their own future.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-scotland-independence-northern-ireland-border-poll-a9105251.html

    [1] What a particularly offensive and arrogant term that is!

  15. Oldnat
    This rumour of Lib Dem7Tory talks looks like fake news to me. The Lib Dems would ne quite happy for the Tories to lose all their seats in Scotland, even to the SNP. Then they would become the de facto opposition (assuming Lsbour lose all their sests as well

    It is I suppose possible that some Remain voting Scottish Tory is thinking of defecting…

  16. Andrew111

    “Fake news” is a rather disreputable term for reporting something that folk don’t like to be reported.

    Now, it may well be your opinion that the P&J is inventing something – for a reason that you fail to identify. You may care to suggest why that paper is reporting something that you claim to be wholly illusory.

    Now it is entirely possible that the Lib-Dems in your part of the world would be happy to see the SNP take every Tory seat in Scotland, where they couldn’t.

    SLD might take a very different view, and your suppositions could be wholly meaningless in the dynamics of politics in Scotland.

  17. Crossbat11 (and CMJ)

    I prefer CMJ’s approach as it eliminates the methodological differences (having said that YouGov sometimes changed its methodology too, and reading the methodology section – so that one can find it out – is boring).

    Th he kind of, let’s call it “diminishing regression” that CMJ uses is quite strong as it devalues the past while maintaining the trend.

    There is a problem with it, not in the data, but in the interpretation though. It eliminates fluctuatuon, but also heightens potentially accidental non-normalities (you know, you have a cold, on the third day you had enough, go to the doctor, the doctor is busy, so the doctor prescribes antibiotics, you take it, you feel better (because it is now the fifth day, and you had a vital infection, so antibiotics have nothing to do with it, but you are attributing – sorry, one attribues).

    If one knows this caution, CMJ’s model is very strong.

  18. @Crossbat

    “Possibly, although I’m more drawn to Alan Bennett’s slightly more prosaic explanation that these people “have trod that dreary safari from left to right which generally comes with age…”

    Rod Liddle springs to mind, but there are many others. Maybe they were faux leftists anyway.”

    ——

    You may be right, you know more about her than me. (You must be a fan or summat).

  19. @Oldnat

    Strange that you bring up ‘Fake News’ and Aberdeen Journals.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Press_and_Journal_(Scotland)#Coverage_of_Trump_International_Golf_Links_Development

    Gove worked for them too once, and apparently was on strike for the NUJ in the 80s. How the worm turns.

  20. @OldNat

    “I remain of the opinion that the weighting factors used by most pollsters are no longer adequate to discern the factors that currently distinguish different voting tendencies.

    More succinctly described – most of them are rubbish (but we don’t know which, if any, aren’t)”

    You put it rather well and it’s the reason I’m a little sceptical about modelling election results on the polling data currently being generated. Even if it was accurate and trustworthy, it can’t possibly predict the outcome of something like a GE that makes its own political weather. Snapshots of opinion, by their very nature, can’t predict anything.

    Of course, the whole exercise becomes even more rickety if the data driving the modelling doesn’t even accurately encapsulate current opinion and voting intention. The model can only be as good as the data it uses.

    It would appear that opinion polling still hasn’t escaped its crisis of credibility.

  21. CB11

    “It would appear that opinion polling still hasn’t escaped its crisis of credibility.”

    and the media haven’t escaped their crisis of credulity.

  22. crossbat11,
    ” It’s 1% to 14%. That’s very wide and suggests something is amiss to me.”

    Just what I thought.

  23. I wonder if part of the reason that polls give wildly different answers to the level of support (particularly for the Tories it seems to me), is that there is a day-to-day variation in the news.

    For instance, if polling takes place the day after a story that suggests that Boris is getting nearer a revised deal, I would expect their support from Leavers to go up. On the other hand if a story breaks that makes it look less likely that we will leave at all, their support will go down.

    I appreciate that this can only be a partial explanation.

  24. Pete B

    “I wonder if part of the reason that polls give wildly different answers to the level of support (particularly for the Tories it seems to me), is that there is a day-to-day variation in the news”

    That seems a very reasonable consideration. While committed supporters of any party are unlikely to be affected, there are lots of people whose understanding of (or concern about) political issues is limited to seeing headlines on the news stand [1] as they do their shopping, or half-hear an item on the radio or TV news.

    What polling doesn’t tell us is how many people move in/out from saying “Don’t Know” as opposed to a (temporary) VI for some party or other.

    Such fluctuations would be of no value whatsoever in predicting how such folk would actually vote in an election – if they bothered to vote at all.

    Pollsters using a panel (such as YG) might be more likely to discern such a factor – but I don’t know if they do or not.

  25. Forgot my footnote!

    [1] The headlines on the news stands can vary with the polities in which different editions are published. I can get a very different impression of “the news” if I pass a news stand in England, compared with what I might observe here.

  26. Regarding variability in the polls I wouldn’t rule out factors that are at the data processing/ statistics end rather than genuinely in the samples.

    It’s typically true that the variability between polls is far too low for the raw two sigma margins of error that they quote, because they’re not random at all but systematically constructed, and generally systematically constructed in imitative ways.

    Could be that just now there isn’t the same certainty about how to construct the samples and weight the data, or to herd, that there might normally be, so we’re getting a more random variance.

  27. Oldnat
    A story is attributed to “Tory sources”. It is then denied by Willie Rennie but repeated by Sturgeon. It is just the sort of story the SNP love to galvanise their base.

    While you may be in Scotland while i am not, i doubt if you have have an unbiased insight into the plans of the SLD. What I see is that the SLD would very much like to replace the Tories as the main opposition to the SNP. I am also sure they will tryvharder in seats they can win like NE Fife than seats they can’t, but that is a target seat strategy, not a pact.

    So what we have here is an unverifiable source and a denial. If you choose not to believe the denial then there are denials by your side in the past that could be questioned. Probably best just to move on unless some real evidence comes to light.

  28. Oldnat,
    Re N Ireland and Scotland and that poll, the article only uses the word “permitted” in the context of N Ireland, so you should reserve your righteous indignation for that polity. I dont know which word if either was used in the poll itself.

    The word “allowed” was used in the case of Scotland. What word would you suggest that would describe the factual constitutional situation without upsetting the SNP?

  29. OLDNAT
    “the Tory lead is anything between 1% and 12%”
    Or, given MOE, perhaps no Tory lead at all?“

    If you’re arguing on the MOE alone and not assuming a systematic bias, the probability a population. has produced seven polls with with a Tory lead of between 1 and 14 percent even though it doesn’t actually have one infinitesimal.

  30. @oldnat

    It looks like Carmichael knows what is going on and Rennie is out of the loop:

    “Liberal Democrat Orkney and Shetland MP Alistair Carmichael told the Press and Journal that while the two parties did talk to each other, there was no pact.

    The former Scottish secretary said: “”We all talk to each other of course, but there’s no pact.”

  31. @andrew111

    “The word “allowed” was used in the case of Scotland. What word would you suggest that would describe the factual constitutional situation without upsetting the SNP?”

    Well it could be the simple and nuetral “A second Scottish independence referendum should be held if ….”

    In the case of NI, the question of permission does not arise: the Secretary of State is mandsted by law to hold one if they consider a majority of voters in NzI support reunification.

  32. That should be NI in the post above not Nzl!

  33. @peterw

    “Is it possible to be too homophobic for Jo’s LibDems?”

    Not while Tim Farron is a leading spokesman.

  34. Hireton
    Carmichael was probably asked “Do you deny you have been talking to the Tories?” Rennie will not be out of the loop and both deny there is any pact. What more can they say?

    On the poll, the aim was clearly to find out what people think given the reality that Westminster has to pass legislation in order for there to be another independence referendum. Since most people outside Scotland are probably unaware of this the question has to be framed somehow. I happen to think that if we do leave the EU then another referendum should occur if the Scottish Parliament renews its request in those circumstances. I think a couple of years for things to settle down would be appropriate however. I would have thought the SNP would want rather more consistent support in the polls though..

    Re. NI, the situation is in reality much less certain since it is up to Westminster (and I believe Dublin) to decide how to interpret the desires of the NI population.

  35. Difficult for the LDs as it is natural for them to want to hoover up outcasts from Labour and Conservatives and most of those who have joined them do sit in the centre Economically and of course have similar view on the EU.

    The Paul Marsden lesson, though, is one that they need to take heed of and be careful. The idea of David Gauke, for example who IIRC was the bedroom tax minister being a better fit for the LDs than the Conservatives is doubtful.

    The reluctant moderators of austerity defence whilst in coalition has a credibility of sorts but welcoming enthusiastic austerity supporters in to the ranks does suggest the rightward shift that many thought may occur under Jo Swinson could be accurate.

    In business companies who grow organically rather than over paying for acquisitions tend to give better shareholder value.

  36. Jim Jam,
    Perhaps we should keep in mind that the Labour Party were late converts to the anti-austerity cause and have the luxury of not having been in government for 9 years?

    People are allowed to change their minds..

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2010/mar/25/alistair-darling-cut-deeper-margaret-thatcher

  37. HIRETON / ANDREW111

    There is a recent Queen’s paper (from which I have copied and pasted a bit) about the border poll.

    http://qpol.qub.ac.uk/a-northern-ireland-border-poll-2/

    “While a border poll is probably some time away, and not inevitable, there is a real possibility that a divisive Brexit may create in the near future a majority for a united Ireland so unequivocal (even if slender) that it must legally be acted upon – little though either government wants it.
    And that is potentially a leap into the void: the Good Friday Agreement offers no route to a united Ireland, only a principle and trigger; nor any blueprint for the end result. A poll in the circumstances could be profoundly destabilising. We need a process, and ideas about the shape of a United Ireland.
    While Seamus Mallon’s specific proposals on changing the threshold for unity raise difficult problems, he points up a fundamental issue. It has been generally recognised for decades that Northern Ireland can only function with a system of government attracting cross community support; and this would still be true in a united Ireland.
    With constructive politics and partnership between the governments, it may be possible to create an orderly path to unity in an agreed Ireland. But it will necessarily proceed in phases.
    Without such a political environment, and if partnership between the governments continues to fail, there are serious risks to all that has been achieved in Ireland in the past 20 years. The risks indeed are there now; the prospect of a poll could gravely exacerbate them.
    We need new thinking and leadership to respond to the challenges that may soon faces. It is doubtful the parties and governments alone can provide it – London in particular seems to be no place to do so. So it can only come from wider society in Northern Ireland. The universities have a real role in shaping it.”

  38. @JimJam

    “The reluctant moderators of austerity defence whilst in coalition has a credibility of sorts but welcoming enthusiastic austerity supporters in to the ranks does suggest the rightward shift that many thought may occur under Jo Swinson could be accurate.”

    It’s difficult to tell the direction of political drifts within parties at a time when a single issue so totally dominates politics. Brexit, or Cameron’s Curse as I now like to call this ghastly mess, has reshaped and realigned virtually everything. In fairness to Swinson, and that inclination doesn’t come naturally to me, I can see the attraction of “trophy” captures from wherever they come. It gives her party momentum, headlines and a sense that they are a coming force, attracting support from right across mainstream political opinion. Blair loved parading defecting Tories in New Labour’s hegemonic days. In that sense, Lee, Woolason and Giymar’s political views and instincts are, for now, pretty irrelevant and it’s probably the Lib Dem stance on Brexit, yes – that blo*dy issue again, that has triggered their particular journey. Is it a signal that Swinson is steering the Lib Dems in a rightward direction? I’m not sure and, again, in fairness to them, they are trying to surf the Brexit wave like all the other political parties. They’ve jumped on a wave generated by a Remain rip tide. Johnson’s on a big Leave breaker and Corbyn is still paddling around in the shallows, holding his surf board and waiting for the wave that he thinks might get him all the way on to the beach!

    Where Swinson is making a potential mistake however, and she compounded it in her interview with Marr this morning, is advertising her hostility to Corbyn in such personally vitriolic terms. Not only is she burning potentially useful future bridges, she may be alienating wavering Labour voters who might, through the fog of recent memory, recall Swinson’s enthusiastic membership of Cameron’s coalition government.

    I suspect, if Labour are sensible, those memories will be revived constantly during a General Election campaign.

    Will the real Jo Swinson please stand up? A true Liberal or potential Tory stooge once again?

  39. ANDREW111

    In my constituency,Manchester Withington, the LibDem MP was annihilated after the coalition .

    I think LDs need to show a bit of remorse for austerity if they want to find favour with voters, rather than blaming Labour for everything.

  40. ANDREW111

    In my constituency,Manchester Withington, the LibDem MP was annihilated after the coalition .

    I think LDs need to show a bit of remorse for austerity if they want to find favour with voters, rather than blaming Labour for everything.

  41. @Crossbat11
    If I’m right, LDems have accepted three moderate ex-Labour MPs (Eagle, Berger and Ummuna) and three moderate Tories (Lee, Wolleaston and Gyimah) – I’m not sure that shows a drift to right or left?

    Presumably the strategy is to try to set the LDems up as a party of the broader centre, appealing to both Blairite Labour and One Nation Tory voters, who probably have more in common with each other than they do with Ukip-inclined rightwingers or the Momentum-inspired left.

    For LDems to take liberalism into government in a sustained way they have to broaden their appeal to both centre-left and centre-right.

    @Valerie
    I agree – to me the LDems still need a ‘Clause 4’ moment; an admission that they got stuff wrong in Coalition alongside the good things that they did.

    I’d like to see more honesty form all politicians. From the Tories endlessly blaming Labour for a global recession caused by regulatory relaxation that the Tories vociferously championed, through Labour’s perpetual obfuscation on Brexit, to LDems not accepting and admitting their errors in office – all parties are guilty of it, and eliminating that dishonesty would be a welcome first step to re-building some trust in politics; I’m not holding my breath though…

  42. @Bigfatron

    “Presumably the strategy is to try to set the LDems up as a party of the broader centre, appealing to both Blairite Labour and One Nation Tory voters, who probably have more in common with each other than they do with Ukip-inclined rightwingers or the Momentum-inspired left.”

    That’s how I read it too, although Andrew111 might give us the inside track on the real strategy! It makes sense for a centrist party to do this, although I do agree with you too that an election winning strategy may require a more wide ranging offer to voters who identify a little more strongly with either left wing or right wing socio-economic views.

    Maybe I’m reading too much into Swinson’s interview this morning, but she studiously avoided answering Marr’s questions about whether she agreed with specific Labour social and economic policies. She couched her reason for refusuing to form a coalition with Labour on the grounds that Corbyn “was an unfit person to be a PM.” This obviously gives her and her party wriggle room if and when Corbyn departs, but it gives her absolutely none for the immediate GE and its aftermath. That, I think, is her potentially fatal mistake.

  43. pedant alert,

    Wrong Angela BRF is Smith not Eagle.

    FWIW, I think Smith and Ummuna are probably a better fit in the LDs than Labour whilst Berger might find some of the Economic and Social Policy of the LDs less comfortable.

    Similarly, Woolaston (like Heide Allen if she moves) could have been an LD perhaps already. Gyimah and Lee, though, where closer to the centre Tory Party except on Europe) and do represent a rebalancing of the PLDs at least. They of course have baggage concerning LGBTQ issues which we know does not site well with some LDs. (LGBT chair resigned on Lee’s defection).

    As Per CB of course the LDs probably have to take these MPs but there are risks is all I am saying.

  44. Senior Lib Dem saying that coalition or C&S with Labour post-GE while Corbyn is leader is not going to happen.

  45. @My How We Laughed

    “Senior Lib Dem saying that coalition or C&S with Labour post-GE while Corbyn is leader is not going to happen.”

    This is the crunch, isn’t it and will it hold if tested to destruction? You may well have a Commons after the next GE where the Lib Dems are essentially the power brokers. Do they throw their hands in with a Rainbow Alliance type government or do they sit it out and potentially usher in another Tory minority government, keeping Johnson in Downing Street?

    If they chose the latter course, purely because of Corbyn, how might that play with Lib Dem members and voters? Remember, embracing the Tories in 2010 virtually wiped them out five years later. Only Brexit has breathed life back into them.

  46. @CrossbatXI

    “Where Swinson is making a potential mistake however, and she compounded it in her interview with Marr this morning, is advertising her hostility to Corbyn in such personally vitriolic terms. Not only is she burning potentially useful future bridges, she may be alienating wavering Labour voters who might, through the fog of recent memory, recall Swinson’s enthusiastic membership of Cameron’s coalition government.

    I suspect, if Labour are sensible, those memories will be revived constantly during a General Election campaign.

    Will the real Jo Swinson please stand up? A true Liberal or potential Tory stooge once again?”

    The trouble with Swinson is that she is a Liberal but not a Social Democrat. As centrists go, therefore, she is to the right of Ed Miliband and even David Miliband. She’s to the right of Alistair Campbell. She’s miles to the right of Charles Kennedy. I would even venture to say that she is to the right of Nick Clegg. Why is this a problem? Apart from the one you point out that it burns bridges with Labour at a politically sensitive time, she is banking on LD Social Democrats (the bulk of their membership) and Lab Social Democrats overlooking her Liberal approach to policy and politics based solely on being aligned with her on Brexit.

    Now everyone is a product of their experiences and their environment and it’s clear that being a Scottish LD is a big reason for Swinson’s approach. She is much closer to the Tories because in Scotland the unionist/nationalist divide is more significant than any other policy division. Consequently, she is much more comfortable chasing Tory seats in middle England than Labour seats in metropolitan areas. Other than Brexit, why would an urban Labour vote cast their ballot for the current LDs?

    I agree that this presents a massive opportunity for Labour. Electorally, the LD stance could work in their favour. All they need to do is satisfy their urban voters on Brexit and the LDs will be forced to concentrate on winning Tory seats. Remember the last GE was meant to be focussed exclusively on Brexit but ended up being significant affected by domestic issues. That the LDs appear to have learned nothing from this is surprising.

  47. @BFR – “I’d like to see more honesty form all politicians. ”

    Oddly enough, for a politician who I thought was completely empty and at times objectionable, I have to say that Cameron’s memoirs do, for once, seem to show a politician showing some contrition. He admits he made big mistakes, not so much in calling the referendum, but around the renegotiation with the EU and the conduct of the remain campaign.

    I think he is also brutally honest about Gove and Johnson, but that’s a different issue.

  48. More evidence of how we desperately need to address online issues within the electoral process – https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/sep/15/tory-brexit-online-data-information-voters-privacy

    Conservatives are suspected of breaching data privacy laws, and separately have been proven to have l!ed about their proposals, this time via deliberately misrepresenting the BBC.

  49. @andrew111

    “Perhaps we should keep in mind that the Labour Party were late converts to the anti-austerity cause and have the luxury of not having been in government for 9 years?”

    Perhaps we should also keep in mind that the Tory/Lib Dem budget of 2010 set out to eliminate the current account deficit in 5 years and the severe fiscal consolidation required was balanced between 23% tax increases (most notably an increase of VAT to 20%) and 77% expenditure reductions, many of those falling on benefits. The Tories were quite open that they saw this not just as a fiscal necessity ( which it wasn’t ) but also as a strategic opportunity to reduce the size of the state. The immediate economic impact was to check back the increase in economic growth which had begun prior to the 2010 UK General Election.

  50. Andrew111

    I’m unclear as to why you are protesting so much about there being no discussions between SLD and SCon.

    Your suggestion that the talks were “fake news” is refuted by your Chief Whip who confirms that there are talks. I’m sure he is correct that there is no “pact” – but then no one said that there was. Indeed, I said that I didn’t expect such.

    You say, “the SLD would very much like to replace the Tories as the main opposition to the SNP.” I agree, but in few seats do they both have a good chance of taking the seat, so an “understanding” as to which seats might be best targeted by each party would make sense.

    Such an “understanding” would be unhelpful to both, were it to be admitted – so it wouldn’t be.

    That SLD hopes to become the main Unionist party in Scotland is obvious from the stance being taken by SLD. They might even achieve that, but co-operating with other insurgent groups, who share a common aim of “overthrowing the regime”, in the meantime, is not an unusual strategy.

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