Just to catch up on the post-budget YouGov polling from yesterday’s Times, carried out on Monday evening and Tuesday morning.

At the simplest level, the budget appears to have polled well. All the measures within met with approval and overall people thought it was a fair budget (44% fair, 14% unfair). Compared to other recent budgets, that’s a very positive score. However, in all fairness that’s what one should expect – it was very much a giveaway budget, with the Chancellor making several large spending announcements and very little in the way of tax increases. Even those tax increases that were announced – mostly notably the plastics tax and tax on internet companies – were ones that were largely popular. It’s hardly surprising that sort of budget gets net positive ratings – increases to NHS funding, the personal allowance and the National Living Wage are always likely to go down well.

A positively received budget does not, however, necessarily translate into a boost in the polls. The voting intention figures in the poll are CON 41%(nc), LAB 39%(+3), LDEM 7%(-1), UKIP 5%(+1). The three point increase in Labour support doesn’t necessarily mean anything – it’s within the normal margin of error – but it certainly doesn’t point towards a budget boost for the Tories.

The poll also asked about the wider perceptions around the “end of austerity”, and here the figures are far less rosy for the Conservatives. Looking back, by 36% to 29% people think that the austerity polices followed after the 2010 election were necessary, though by 36% to 30% they now think they didn’t help the economy and by 43% to 20% they think they were unfair.

58% of people now think it is right to end austerity (27% who think it was wrong to begin with, 31% who thought it was right at the time, but it is now time to end it). Unfortunately for the government, while people may be in agreement with their stated policy, they don’t actually believe they are doing it – only 10% think the government have ended austerity policies, 50% think they have not.

Full tabs are .


1,813 Responses to “YouGov post-budget poll”

1 2 3 37
  1. First?

    Perhaps the reason ‘a friendly budget’ is not yet helping the government is that many people, perhaps everyone, is aware that the effect of the budget may turn out to be quite limited – depending on how things work out with brexit. After all, the Chancellor himself stated that a further budget may be necessary in the spring, depending on what happens over the next six months.

  2. “Full tabs are.”

    Enigmatic ending to AW’s editorial. I’m guessing he meant to add “here”:

    http://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/y8iwpyuaaf/TimesResults_181030_VI_Trackers_BudgetQs_bpcw.pdf

  3. I’ve always thought that most budgets are as much political mood music as the application of actual economic policy instruments and that’s what Hammond was up to on Monday, I suspect. Spending pledges based on OBR tax receipt forecasts that may well not materialise and everything second-guessed by Brexit and next year’s spending review. In a sense it was a virtual reality budget intended to generate positive headlines and to spin the “End of Austerity” soundbite for maximum effect. There was also the usual stunts, this time on future tax changes, intended to wrong foot the opposition and, judging on the confusion they caused in Labour’s ranks, they probably achieved their desired results. Will the budget have any great financial impact on people’s lives? Beyond a fuel duty freeze that keeps the cost of personal car travel down, not much I suspect but, then again, it probably wasn’t intended to change a lot materially. The responses in this YouGov poll, when the questions were pushed at them, got generally positive scores from the respondents, but I suspect the level of public engagement with this budget was pretty low; hence the almost zero effect on voting intentions. It was typical May in many ways. Knife and fork events to live another day. Probably achieved that objective, but not much else. I sometimes wonder if May ever looks much beyond the next Commons showdown, Tory MPs meeting, EU Summit, party conference etc. A very strange way to govern, but on the basis she’s still there, it must be working, I suppose!

    Changing the subject, I’m going to keep my eye on this Aaron Banks case now the NCA are involved. Lots of Philip Green-esque bluster from Banks in response, as to be expected, but depending on how this case unfolds, I suspect potentially seismic political fall out. Well done to Damian Collins and his Select Committee on this too. House of Commons and Parliament at its best. Banks has contempt and disdain for both so it’s nice to see him get bitten in return.

  4. CB11

    “In a sense it was a virtual reality budget”

    I like that analogy.

  5. Damn. Should have said “I like that metaphor”.

  6. @OldNat

    You always were a stickler for figures of speech.

    Can I be your friend again?

    :-):-)

  7. “Perhaps the reason ‘a friendly budget’ is not yet helping the government is that many people, perhaps everyone, is aware that the effect of the budget may turn out to be quite limited – depending on how things work out with brexit.”

    ——

    Also one wonders how much of it is due to policies designed to shore up the base and keep the oldies happy, rather than going after new votes. That’s what we need really, an analysis of which bits of the budget might attract new voters.

  8. CB11

    Pals is fine by me.

  9. @OldNat

    Good man!

  10. CB11

    We can doubtless also agree that anyone (Trump in this case) who says of a rock – “We will consider that a firearm. Because there’s not much difference.” is either ignorant of the meaning of words (unlikely) or deliberately uses them to distort reality among his supporters.

  11. ON/CB11

    Please don’t use this site as a cheap dating agency: it is a forum for squabbling, please show some respect.

  12. R&D

    “Cheap”????

    Anthony charges me thousands to “meet new friends” on this site!

    Is he at it?

  13. ON

    That’s probably ‘cos he has placed you in the irascible/hard to match category…

  14. R&D

    :-)

  15. @R&D

    “ON/CB11

    Please don’t use this site as a cheap dating agency: it is a forum for squabbling, please show some respect.”

    This is the sort of outrageous smear that I’ve come to expect from the cyber cesspit that is now UKPR. If you don’t retract your foul and unjustified allegations about OldNat and myself I will have no alternative but to seek some sort of legal redress.

    Either that or arrange a visit to you from Trevor Warne. I understand he takes no prisoners.

    :-)

  16. I doubt the Banks affair will change much. Remainers are trying to delegitimise the Leave victory, inspite of the fact that Remain enjoyed the support of all the main political parties, the civil service, the Bank of England, the BBC, the CBI, the IMF, the OECD, the EU, the TUC, the BMA and every major professional organisation, most of whom openly campaigned for a Remain vote. Leavers, for their part, believe (with good reason) that the referrendum was stacked against them, and see the attacks on Banks as an attempt to criminalise and punish anyone who opposes the Euro-imperialist establishment. All that is happenjng is that each side is becoming more entrenched in their views.

  17. Interesting report on Amber Rudd’s resignation.

    I have a lot of sympathy for her. The issues with Windrush folk began about 20 yrs ago – My dad’s friend had major issues getting a UK passport due to problems to do with his immigration records. His Labour MP helped him out.

    Whenever this really came to ahead, the Home Secretary in situ was bound to get it in the neck. This time pass the parcel stopped on Amber’s watch.

    Whoever you vote for, you want want Government ministers to be smart, work hard on issues and have humanity and integrity. I think all of these attributes that Amber has.

    TM’s Government would be better with AR in the Cabinet.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-46067514

  18. James E “Full tabs are.”

    Enigmatic ending to AW’s editorial. I’m guessing he meant to add “here”:

    http://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/y8iwpyuaaf/TimesResults_181030_VI_Trackers_BudgetQs_bpcw.pdf

    Strangely, the full stop at the end of AW’s editorial is the link …

  19. Moomo: I doubt the Banks affair will change much. Remainers are trying to delegitimise the Leave victory, … . Leavers, for their part, believe (with good reason) that the referrendum was stacked against them, and see the attacks on Banks as an attempt to criminalise and punish anyone who opposes the Euro-imperialist establishment. All that is happenjng is that each side is becoming more entrenched in their views.

    So you think he didn’t break the law? If that is what you think, then you should say so and back it up, because it would help your argument. If you are concerned about views becoming entrenched, it is no good glossing over the question of whether he did anything criminal. That just makes me think you are prepared to overlook any criminal actions by the leave side which might be relevant.

  20. @ CATMANJEFF

    “TM’s Government would be better with AR in the Cabinet.”

    Maybe, but she has a big ego and she herself blundered into the Windrush mess. Also took one for TM.

  21. CMJ

    I agree.

    Javid releasing the internal report on the Department’s failures to advise her of facts. He wants these skeletons out in the open.

    Bot he & AR will be contenders come the day I think.

  22. @JIB

    Windrush could have blown up in the face on any government. It was powder built up over decades of bad decisions.

    I personally found AR to be one of the most self-effacing ministers out there. All ministers need self confidence, but I think she was more open, modest and less ideological than most of her cabinet colleagues.

    You may not be surprised to find out I also liked Justine Greening for similar reasons.

  23. @ TechnicolourOctober

    Thanks – didn’t spot the full stop link.

    Re Arron Banks – the fact that he appears to have somehow accrued most of his fortune just at the time when he started bankrolling UKIP has not gone unnoticed. This article may be a useful guide to the things the National Crime Agency will be investigating.

    http://www.opendemocracy.net/uk/brexitinc/adam-ramsay/how-did-arron-banks-afford-brexit

  24. Numbers

    “Some 44 per cent think a no deal outcome is on the horizon, while 29 per cent are expecting a deal.

    panel of 100 academic experts. This month, they rate the odds [ of no deal] at 46 per cent.

    The Hansard Society have found that just 10 per cent of the minimum number of statutory instruments needed to make many basic day-to-day laws function properly have been enacted.

    the National Audit Office has suggested there are red flashing lights on 11 of the 12 IT systems needed for our borders to function properly if we leave on March 29, 2019.

    he word “Brexit” featured just three times in Hammond’s budget but 66 times in the Office of Budget Responsibility’s report on the budget.

    Research published by the Federation of Small Businesses — and more than 99 per cent of businesses are small — found that only one in seven firms have started planning for a no-deal Brexit.

    So what explains this disconnect between a public braced for no deal and a public realm nowhere near prepared?”

    You can find the suggested answer here

    http://ukandeu.ac.uk/the-government-has-very-competently-convinced-mps-that-it-is-too-incompetent-to-deliver-no-deal/

  25. Numbers – from experts.

    http://ukandeu.ac.uk/brexit-policy-panel-september-2018/

    “A ‘Canada Style’ deal is viewed as the most probable outcome, and increasingly so. 58% of our experts view this as the most likely outcome, an increase of 16 percentage points from last month’s survey.
    91% of our experts think Theresa May will in office to see Brexit through. However, the consensus is that she will no longer be in office come the current date for the end of the transition period – 7 out of 10 (71%) think she will be gone by December 2020.
    The panel think the parliamentary arithmetic in the House of Commons is in the balance: overall, they give Theresa May a 53% chance of getting her deal through the House of Commons.
    Our panel now think that checks in Ireland will be ‘East-West’ (40%) rather than ‘North-South’ (29%). Only 22% think there will be no checks. Last month, the expectation was that the principal checks would be ‘North-South’.
    The perceived likelihood of the UK leaving with no deal has barely shifted. The dial has moved from giving a no-deal outcome a 46% to a 45% chance.
    60% of our experts think a deal will be made between the UK and the EU by the end of December 2018.
    Our panel have changed their view on Labour’s Brexit position: the BPP now thinks it is more likely than not that the Labour Party will come out in support of a referendum before 29 March 2019.
    Our panel give just under a 1 in 3 chance of a further referendum on EU membership – giving the odds as 3.1 out of 10”

  26. TCO

    I wouldn’t be surprised at all if Banks broke the law, but I don’t think that attempts to block Brexit through the courts off the back of it will come to anything. Since the referendum we’ve had a general election where both major parties ran on a platform of leaving the EU, and between them got their highest share of the vote in something like 60 years, there is definitely a mandate for Brexit. I agree with MOOMO that it likely just plays into a feeling among leavers that the establishment is set on trying to invalidate their votes. Investigate properly, bring criminal charges, send people to jail if they deserve to go to jail, but I think events have moved on too far from an argument about whether the referendum was legitimate or not.

    CMJ

    There seems to be something toxic in the culture at the Home Office, from top to bottom. Senior civil servants were hiding reports and feeding misinformation to ministers, while staff on the shop floor (as it were) ignored the rules in the legislation and denied people their rights in order to hit targets. The whole rotten mess needs to be placed under a microscope.

  27. For those who take a rather laissez-faire attitude to the breaking of electoral laws, this might make for sobering reading.

    Slippery slopes and all that.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/nov/02/democracy-loser-us-midterms-poor-ethnic-minorities

    Interesting footnote to this article. A Republican Presidential candidate hasn’t won the popular vote in a US presidential race since 1988, some 30 years ago. Didn’t stop one or two making it the White House though! I don’t know, the will of the people and all that.

    :-)

  28. [email protected] … there is definitely a mandate for Brexit. I agree with MOOMO that it likely just plays into a feeling among leavers that the establishment is set on trying to invalidate their votes. Investigate properly, bring criminal charges, send people to jail if they deserve to go to jail, but I think events have moved on too far from an argument about whether the referendum was legitimate or not.

    Doing something about it plays into the feeling among leavers.

    But then

    Not doing anything about it plays into feeling among Remainers.

    It doesn’t go away. It will have to be revisited.

  29. @CROSSBAT11

    The world has changed this is about winning, winning is now the only thing that matters.

    I suspect we got close to this when we had posters like this:
    https://twitter.com/montie/status/591905055151915009?lang=en

    I personally do think people views will change since at the extreme you have people describing the EU as a dictatorship. In many ways their grievance goes beyond the EU but at society and it shape and the need for changing it to something they are more comfortable with.

    We have had the equivalent of the republican control for virtually every government we have ever had at least in my life time with at best low 40% getting absolute power so we are used to the idea of all or nothing politics.

    @CATMANJEFF
    @GARJ

    I suspect there will lots of people in her constituency who would not agree with that
    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/amber-rudd-saudi-arabia-speech-shut-down-claims-nicholas-wilson-a7774126.html

    I believe her new found rationalism only occurs because others are pretty poor.

    Secondly much of the problem with targets i s how they are applied. for example junior police officers are supposed to have so many arrests it is why you will find the issue with young inexperienced offices getting into trouble and causing a issue you tend to get with certain people. Indeed speak to one ex officer wqhen I pointed this out to him he accepted that there were better ways of gain proficiency rather than how many people you can arrest. You can see it skewing the US justice system and I suspect we have the same issues with the UK system. We also had the same problem when the New Labour came to power, it was interetsing when I spoke to Tony bank (my hometown MP) he said that they had no data at all about the number of bed or occupancy rates or indeed any details on use of the NHS. They moved to get targets and brought in aggressive managers whom looked at the targets and not the aims. So one trick was to see every patient for 5 minutes and thus take them off the waiting list although no treatment would have been provided since it was about whether they had seen a consultant rather than whether they had received treatment or diagnosis.

    Windrush was essentially the fact that you put a target that will be hard to meet and then you find managers finding creative ways to meet them. In an analytical world it really matters what analytics you care about. it is why we have people who were declared fit to work ending up dead two weeks later. Anyone at the top would have had an understanding of this because of the fact we have too many examples of this sort of analytical failure but we seem to keep doing it because in part it is a political selling point and electoras like numbers but are not smart enough in the main to unddertand the consequences

    I remember someone asking an advisor about the issue with cutting benefits and his response was the Tory base loves it, I suspect we would need a case like a decorated soldier, get treated like sh1t and dies before there will be a real backlash and even then I suspect a paper will find something about him that negates the story.

    I suspect they are not as unaware as we would hope they would be.

  30. @CMJ

    “TM’s Government would be better with AR in the Cabinet.”

    Hmmm, I’m a little less keen to eulogise, even taking into account the recent report suggesting that Rudd was continually given incorrect information on the Windrush scandal by her senior civil servants. This appears to be the reason she then “inadvertently misled” Parliament, thereby leading to her resignation. There is of course another way of looking at it and this is of a Senior Cabinet minister not in control of her brief and her department and with a team of civil servants holding her in fairly low esteem. That doesn’t suggest we’re in the company of greatness here.

    In mitigation, she was May’s fall “guy” in the Home Secretary job, probably with the hidden and sole brief of making sure that the PM’s fingerprints weren’t visible on the Windrush scandal fall-out. It would appear that this game is still being played with some Downing Street resistance to Javid’s eagerness for a full enquiry. I guess their fear is that May’s tenure as Home Secretary won’t look good when the full facts are known. Long grass kicking going on, I hear.

    Rudd is personable and conducts a good TV interview in a sort of emollient Michael Fallonesque way, smoothing over troubled government waters, but I can’t really recall a single memorable thing that she has either said or done whilst holding senior positions in government.

    Now, Justine Greening is a different animal altogether. Definitely one to watch there, but Rudd? I’m far less enamoured.

  31. @Moomoo

    A warm welcome to a new poster, but I have to say, as keen as I was to read your thoughts, when I see language like “the Euro-imperialist establishment”, I do tend to turn off and avoid further engagement.

    All a bit too Private Eye Dave Spart for me. When are bourgeois capitalist paper tigers going to make an appearance I wonder?

    :-)

  32. CB,

    Think we have just demonstrated sadly why Greening will never be allowed to advance in the modern Tory party as too many LOC people find her agreeable and impressive.

    Might take a long wilderness first and then it could be too late.

    Arguably similarly impressive Labour figures are in the same position, albeit in opposition?

  33. @JimJam

    “Think we have just demonstrated sadly why Greening will never be allowed to advance in the modern Tory party as too many LOC people find her agreeable and impressive.”

    Agreed, and it probably did for Ken Clarke too. By the way, that link to the video of Rudd at that hustings meeting was scary, wasn’t it? I hadn’t seen that before. Dear oh dear.

    As for Labour leadership exiles, I think you’re right. I’m a Hilary Benn man myself but his boat might well have sailed already. In terms of the Corbyn wing of the party, I’m getting ever more impressed by Angela Rayner. Wouldn’t it be refreshing to see someone like that, with her background and life story, having a crack at Number 10? Left school as a pregnant teenager at the age of 16 and worked as a care worker? Could it happen?

    I hope so one day. Come on Angela.

  34. Test again….

  35. Good morning to all of you. After some teething troubles, it would appear I have now “appeared”, If you know what I mean.
    I have followed this site – as an observer – for some time and now feel it the right time to add comment.
    The world is becoming a more and more polarised place with views not agreed with or deemed “wrong” being shut down with vitriol and sometimes worse.
    Civility, accepting the other chap’s point of view and not taking oneself too seriously seem to be dying arts.

  36. What amazes me with the polls at the moment is the fact that this government still commands a lead, albeit a small one.

  37. @ CARFREW (last thread) – “Re: Liberalisation, not sure if anyone has a full set of numbers to determine the outcome one way or the other”

    If we’re taking “liberalisation” to be the opening up of EU service sector then COLIN posted several articles from respected sources showing lots of “numbers” and going into detail on the reasons behind why the Brussels “PR” is a long way from the reality.

    Its just that Remain folks chose/choose to ignore the “numbers” and instead believe the Brussels spin.

    The “outcome” based on the “numbers” is v.clear – cr4p.

  38. Agree that Angela Rayner is one to watch. Sadly though I’ve seen some disparaging personal comments about her on here before based on her accent and background – showing that class prejudice is still far too ingrained.

    Back to her politics, I think I read an interview with her where she saw herself as more ‘soft left’ than Corbynite left. Clive Lewis would be another one to watch on the left of the party.

    From elsewhere in the party, Sadiq Khan (from centre of the party, like Ed Miliband?) is obviously one to watch, though the timing around London mayoral elections might not work too his advantage, and Thornberry’s stock has risen over the past couple of years.

    Don’t see Corbyn shifting for a while just yet though, and yes, I agree that Greening is probably the acceptable face of Tory party for many who aren’t natural Tory voters.

  39. “Have ended austerity”

    OK pedantic alert!! The question should have been

    “Are ending austerity” (or similar)

    A tense (ie timing) issue there!!!

    Not sure if that would have made a material difference to the answer, maybe more CON VI would have shifted over? X-breaks were:

    CON net -13 for “have ENDED austerity”
    LAB net -62!!

    huge DKs in CON at 41! Torn between partisan loyalty and correct tense.

    Clearly a huge partisan split in all the questions relating to austerity and the other YG poll on austerity (relinked below) shows folks aren’t really sure what “end of austerity” means. The highest response being:

    Spending more money on public services:
    “End of austerity” means this 38
    doens’t mean this 26
    not sure 36

    Not sure ranged from 33 to 44 across their five “definitions” so and as a few pundits have mentioned it is probably more to do with what you see/hear than the actual cash and that will take time (and more money) to turn. A bit of PR from CON wouldn’t go amiss either.

    At least Hammond has stopped talking down his own party but a bit more Tigger and a bit less Eeyore wouldn’t hurt!

    http://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/3ak4cqb6q6/Peston_181030_Results_w.pdf

  40. Hugo

    “What amazes me with the polls at the moment is the fact this Government still commands a lead”.

    Not quite so amazing when you consider Corbyn and his motley crew are the alternative.

  41. PTRP

    Targets are all fine and well for the ministers at the top of the tree to assess how effective their policies are at achieving their goals, but it becomes a serious issue when a target driven culture permeates down through the layers of civil service management and onto the shoulders of staff whose only concern should be following the rules. Things like arrest targets for individual officers really ought to be forbidden.

    Never had much time for Rudd though, always thought she gave off an air of being an unimaginative career politician climbing the ministerial ladder. Her brief tenure at the HO didn’t exactly show someone well suited to a leadership position, Javid seems to be doing a much better job of actually being in charge.

    TCO

    Something will be done, in the sense that people will (hopefully) be prosecuted. If the issue of the referendum’s legitimacy is to be revisited, then it will likely have to be by the public choosing to vote for remain (or rejoin) supporting parties at the next election. To be honest though I expect the Tories to struggle on to 2022, and by then the last thing I would expect the public to want would be another five years of dining on the cold sick of Brexit.

    CB11

    Angela Rayner

    Gods, I hope not.

  42. @ Hugo

    “What amazes me with the polls at the moment is the fact that this government still commands a lead”

    Welcome. Although we know we shouldn’t read much into local by-elections, I think one of last night’s results is illustrative:

    “Dodington (South Gloucestershire) result:

    LDEM: 49.3% (+8.4)
    CON: 39.4% (+16.8)
    LAB: 11.2% (-1.6)

    LDem HOLD.

    No UKIP (-23.7) as prev.”

    Although there are many Tory MPs who probably didn’t really want Brexit, the referendum ploy has definitely succeeded in one respect. For the moment it has pretty much killed the UKIP threat and pulled many of those voters back to CON. If we want to stretch the interpretation of the above result way beyond anything that is reasonable, you could say they have gained more from the demise of UKIP than they’ve lost to LD because of Brexit, hence overall, their vote is up. And the sort of voters in this gain are probably the sort that are not going to be tempted to run to either of the other main parties, so it’s probably a fairly robust vote.

    It’s a very broad brush, but I feel that’s the general picture in the whole of UK which is keeping the Tory VI at it’s current level.

  43. @ CARFREW – “Also one wonders how much of it is due to policies designed to shore up the base and keep the oldies happy, rather than going after new votes”

    Having already scrapped the “triple punch to pensioners” there was nothing expected for “oldies” and nothing in the budget to make them happy(ier).

    They didn’t mess with pension contributions (important for those nearing retirement) despite that being rumoured. That might have helped “shore” up the “middle class” (in age and wage) but the hikes in tax thresholds would be more of a positive surprise for them.

    As for going after “new votes” then nothing major in the budget.

    We should wait for a few more polls before declaring that ENDING austerity had no effect on VI (or possibly even a modest own goal but moving the debate to Corbyn’s turf?!?).

    The voter demographic CON have a realistic chance of turning are workers, especially non-graduates, in the 18-49 age groups. More money in your pocket will help but a bad Winter for NHS and continuing rise in crime will work the other way.

    Maybe we won’t see it in VI but it could be the return of the “shy Tory” perhaps (ala Matt Singh 2015)?

    In next GE if you vote ABC then that is not a throw away protest vote it will actually mean you want Corbyn as PM and McDonnell as CoE with them likely needing SNP for C+S!

    Obviously if the GE is before/after 29Mar’19 will be important as well and Corbyn still getting away with ambiguity on Brexit.

  44. @ myself

    “in the whole of UK”

    Hmmm, on this occasion I’ve incorrectly said UK, when I certainly don’t mean NI and probably Scotland is quite different too. Apologies.

  45. Crossbat etc

    re Angela Rudd

    Those of us unfortunate enough to be on the receiving end of Home Office policy during her tenure, know that she was a/. not much interested in her brief, b/. did exactly what Theresa told her, and c/. useless.

    From what I know of Greening, she actually talked to teachers, had an independant mind, and understood educational issues.

    Not really fair to lump the two together, imho.

  46. HUGO

    “Civility, accepting the other chap’s point of view and not taking oneself too seriously seem to be dying arts.”

    Rubbish !!!!

    [Oh – and welcome….]

  47. Trigguy

    Many thanks for your insight.

    The Brexit dominates everything, it would appear and my view is that the PM will get a “deal”, bring it back to the House and it will pass. Mr Corbyn , and Mr Mcdonnell are old school Euro Sceptics who want out , and for all the bluster, it will come to pass.

  48. Rosieand dasie

    Thank you !

    A question ….

    When the Chancellor announces, say, more money for the NHS, I believe a proportionate amount is allocated out to the devolved authorities – the Scottish Parliament and Welsh Assembly.
    Do they then have to spend this on the NHS, or can they allocate it as they see fit?

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