This week’s YouGov poll for the Times has topline figures of CON 42%(nc), LAB 40%(+1), LDEM 9%(nc). Fieldwork was Monday and Tuesday and changes are from last week. The two point lead is a little lower than YouGov have been showing of late, but nothing outside normal sample variation.

On the other regular YouGov trackers, 44% of people think that Britain was wrong to vote for Brexit, 43% think it was right. Just 22% of people think that the government are doing well at negotiating Bret, 62% think they are doing badly (including a majority of both Leavers and Remainers). While the poll was taken after the government’s announcement of extra funding for the NHS, it has unsurprisingly has little impact on which party people trust more on the issue – 34% of people think Labour would handle the NHS better, 24% think the Conservatives would. Full tabs are here.

While it’s not a particularly new poll (the fieldwork was conducted the weekend before last) there was also a newly published BMG poll yesterday. Topline figures there were CON 38%(-1), LAB 41%(+2), LDEM 11%(+1). Changes are since early May. This is the only poll since mid-April to have shown Labour ahead. Full tabs are here.

UPDATE: A third poll out tonight. Survation have topline figures of CON 41%(nc), LAB 38%(-2), LDEM 7%(-2). Fieldwork was Tuesday to Thursday and changes are from the start of the month. The poll has some more questions on Brexit – full details are here.


1,218 Responses to “Latest YouGov and BMG voting intentions”

1 2 3 4 25
  1. Since there’s been some chat about the future of the independence movement, I must say that the SNP have done a very good job of controlling the cybernats over the past few months. It did look, especially at the height of their indignation in the aftermath of the barbarities in Catalonia, that they were going to overrun the movement, but the party’s high command has wrestled back control, and the rhetoric coming out these days is much more realistic about what independence would mean.

    There’s probably a lesson for the Labour moderates in all this.

  2. Polltroll: CB11: “My hunch [is] that the leave vote is clinging limpet-like to the Tories.”

    Why should that be the case, when polling shows that the vast majority of them also feel the Tories are screwing up the Brexit negotiations?

    ‘Cos it is only the tories who give them any hope of getting their precious, precious brexit,

  3. Good morning all from a very sunny Central London. Think I might be spending my lunch hour with the pigeons across at the square.

    CATMANJEFF

    “EU Referendum Voting Intention (change since 4th June)

    The poll also finds that if the referendum was rerun today the UK would remain in the EU, for the first time since March.

    Leave 47% (-2)
    Remain 53% (+2)”
    ___________

    A large proportion of those who voted Brexit did so in the hope that immigration would be brought back under control, however after yesterdays government announcement that 3.3 million EU nationals can apply to stay in the UK for £65 (nothing wrong with that) but the fact they can apply to bring their closest relatives over as well myth busts the Tories election promises and that of the Brexit campaign about bringing immigration down.

    I voted for Brexit and was sold a dead goose with one left foot. The whole negotiation process has been a disaster. I voted to get away from unpronounceable unelected EU misfits but instead got a row of elected misfits making a hash of the whole process.

    Anyway back to the EU poll. I’m not at all surprised the poll is showing more “Bregrets” for the above reasons.

  4. TO

    “‘Cos it is only the tories who give them any hope of getting their precious, precious brexit,”

    I think Labour will also deliver Brexit and the SNP is unlikely to campaign against it.

    Also, the Tories will cling to Brexit as the means of healing the powerful divisions over the EU.

  5. Hireton

    Richard North has a go at reporting the Airbus story in usual combative manner.

    http://eureferendum.com/

  6. Following the visit by Juncker to the Oireachtas the Irish Times has an editorial on his visit.

    https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/editorial/the-irish-times-view-on-the-brexit-talks-a-lesson-in-solidarity-1.3539043

    “The failure of the British to come up with a coherent approach to the commitment on the Irish backstop given last December has caused deep frustration in Brussels and Dublin. It means there is a real possibility that the talks could end with no deal. The dire consequences of this for the UK do not seem to have impinged on the country’s political leaders but it will become an inescapable outcome unless the Irish backstop issue is sorted to the satisfaction of the EU negotiators.

    Juncker had a clear message for Ireland and Britain yesterday. Saying he respected the British decision to leave, he added that Ireland should not have to pay the price for that choice. “This is why when it comes to Brexit, I have always said that it is a case of ‘Ireland first’.” He went on to say that the 26 other member states and the commission will continue to back Ireland and strongly resist any temptation to isolate this State. “Ireland has to be part of the deal,” he said.”

  7. sam: I think Labour will also deliver Brexit and the SNP is unlikely to campaign against it.

    Also, the Tories will cling to Brexit as the means of healing the powerful divisions over the EU.

    Labour are too flaky on brexit for a true believer to trust them with it. Looking at the mess the tories are making, Labour would be perceived as more willing to triangulate ever closer to the EU.

    The SNP have more important business. The problem for us is not so much brexit as the UK. Brexit is only a symptom.

    As for the tories using brexit to heal divisions, brexit is the division.

  8. What interests me about the Survation poll is that, while Labour and LDems are down a bit, the ‘Bregret’ vote is UP;

    Normally the ‘Bregret’ metric flexes up when there is a better poll for Labour and down when there is a better poll for Tories, suggesting movement is partly down to MoE.

    This linkage appears to be broken in thjs poll, which might mean the movement is more significant?

    I guess we need more opinion polls to tell…

  9. Some Brexit papers are hedging their bets (Danny), a slight majority now seem to think that they would now vote remain (Catmanjeff), airbus is thinking of flying off to the continent (news), other companies are secretly thinking of doing the same (Chris Riley). Will all this produce the change of heart predicted by Crossbatt11 or are ‘conservative attitudes’ going to ensure we rush lemming like over the cliff. ToH is silent of late but I can’t see him changing his mind. Colin or policeman Neil are probably better bellwethers and to my eyes they indicate unease rather than a change of heart.

  10. Charles: “Colin or policeman Neil are probably better bellwethers and to my eyes they indicate unease rather than a change of heart.”

    Indeed, though as bellwethers are apparently castrated rams, I’m not sure Colin and Neil will be entirely comfortable with the concept.

    One can’t expect any change from the headbangers, but there must surely come a point where intelligent, non-obsessive brexiteers acknowledge the accumulating evidence that Brexit, whatever form it takes, will do more harm than good to the country.

    Already today we’ve seen Allan Christie say “I voted for Brexit and was sold a dead goose with one left foot.” What with sheep and geese, we’ve probably had enough livestock metaphors, but maybe a few lemmings are now beginning to realise what awaits if there’s no turning back.

  11. Alec,

    “If Scotland can allow a development, which even it’s supporters accept will cause significant ecological damage to a site with international importance, all because there are supposed business opportunities to be gained, then there is something wrong with Scottish Planning law.”

    No, there is nothing wrong with the Law.

    The Planing Officer(s) will have Recommended Refusal based on the damage and the Council Solicitor will have checked to see that it is legally valid, but the officials then put it to Councillors to determine.

    The Law allows them to go against a Recommendation if they have a Valid planning reason. If they do there is a Council Solicitor at the meeting to check it is legally valid.

    However for Major developments the SG can call it in and overturn or accept the Decision with or without Conditions, if they feel that it is appropriate to do so.

    This decision must also be Legally Valid, but is ultimately made by the responsible Minister.

    The Law is sound, but when it gives results people don’t like they shoot the messenger!

    The weakness isn’t the Law it’s the Politicians and sometimes the Public who make decisions based on what they think is most important, be it economic benefit, ecological protection or in some case electoral or personal gain.

    You could take politicians out of the process but then there would be “NO DEMOCRACY!”, it would all be done by “Faceless Pen Pushing Bureaucrats” taking “Backhanders!”

    Planners don’t have the wisdom of solomon just his responsibilities. It will always create winners and losers and be adversarial.

    Those who call for changes to the law fall into two categories; Those who don’t like a particular decision and who blame the system, usually the disgruntled public and those who want to avoid making unpopular decisions, usually politicians.

    That’s why there are always calls to change the system and laws and we are always tinkering with it and making changes; in the vain hope that we can come up with something that will always keep people happy.

    Why do people believe there is a better way to do it?
    Because they want to!

    That way they wouldn’t be disappointed or have to make tough choices.

    However; Just because that would be nice doesn’t make it achievable.

    Peter.

  12. Over the weekend I shall update my “What Happens Now?” post from 31/05.

    To whet your appetites, one of the six scenarios has some significant new information.

    But the big deal is that the odds of various outcomes have changed dramatically over the last three weeks: the extreme cases are now more likely and the central ones are rapidly becoming politically impossible.

  13. hal: Over the weekend I shall update my “What Happens Now?” post from 31/05.

    To whet your appetites, one of the six scenarios has some significant new information.

    But the big deal is that the odds of various outcomes have changed dramatically over the last three weeks: the extreme cases are now more likely and the central ones are rapidly becoming politically impossible.

    I’m looking at 7:37pm here: http://ukpollingreport.co.uk/blog/archives/10001/comment-page-19#comments and I agree, the central outcomes are becoming less likely. Looking forward to your update.

  14. Suravtion poll. CMJ posted link on previous page, or for the tabs use this link.
    http://survation.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/GMB-Final-Tables.pdf

    Q11 Asks if people know what the EU CU is – only 17% get it right!
    Q12 – SM, a bit better at 38%

    This will be important as we move into the July HoC votes. Folks will have strong opinions about an issue that the majority of folks do not understand!!

    Q8 Asks about a new ref but doesn’t explicitly state the choice (they ask “accept or reject” but Leave can consider reject = no deal, where as my guess is Remain think reject = stay on pre Jun’16 terms). That is an important minor detail as AW has mentioned before!

    However, we continue to see it is LAB who really want EURef2, although CON has risen and now close to equal.

    X-breaks

    LAB:
    Support 55.5
    Oppose 15.0

    Net +40.5

    CON:
    Support 39.5
    Oppose 43.4

    Net -3.9

  15. @ HAL – There has only been two realistic political possibilities since the Mayb0tch GE and pact with DUP. It took a while for EC to work it out but since then its been:

    1/ BINO (ie CU+SM+ECJ+ full divorce bill + ongoing payments etc, aka vassal state)
    2/ WTO

    You could split #2 out into amicable and nasty perhaps.
    2a Amicable WTO: Pay for transition and use that time for implementation and possibly even obtain new UK-EU FTA in that time.
    2b Nasty WTO: Don’t pay full divorce bill, risk lose of transition which requires Plan C (or D) implement temporary open border backstop.

    The HoC vote last week reduced the probability of BINO and possibly improved Amicable WTO. It looks like CON-Remain aren’t going to risk a GE or leadership challenged and LAB-Leave are there to make up the numbers even if they did.

    29 June EU Council meeting is likely to see them start dictating BINO v WTO terms as they have zero reason to compromise on anything – BINO is by far their best outcome and they probably expect us to take that option. The July votes in HoC will hence be important (assuming May doesn’t delay them)

  16. @Somerjohn, A bellwether is one that leads or sets a trend. Apologies to Colin and Neil for any other unintended connotation.

  17. Thirteen local by-elections last night (including a three-seat election in Brent):
    – Two Ukip losses; one taken by Labour (Pitsea in Basildon) by eight votes over Tories, and one taken by LDems (West Somerset)
    – Two Tory losses; one to LDems (Sth Northants, LDems take 57% in a seat that was previously Con unopposed) and one to Ind (Cherwell BC)

    Both LDem gains were in seats that they didn’t fight last time out!

    Cons retained their other four seats, Labour held their four and LDems their one

    Notable that UKIP votes in their previous seats did not go to the Tories (at least on a net basis) – both Labour and LDems went up as Ukip collapsed, although there may be quite a lot of churn in there…

  18. @Charles

    Don’t worry. I know what a bellwether is, and its now accepted meaning as a leading indicator. I was just trying for a bit of levity.

  19. @Somerjohn I know! But I actually think that a bellwether was originally a lead sheep that wore a bell. Your comment reminded me that it was usually female and I am not sure that that would have been acceptable either,

  20. @Charles

    I don’t think a wether is ever female. Here’s the google dictionary:

    wether
    ?w?ð?/
    noun
    noun: wether; plural noun: wethers

    a castrated ram.

    However, the interesting point is whether (ha!) we’ll see formerly brexit-inclined posters here, and more generally commentators elsewhere, getting beyond the point of unease to confessing a conversion.

    As a concept, brexit increasingly resembles a ship holed below the waterline. At the moment, the band plays bravely on and the officers maintain all will be well, but there will surely come a point where only the terminally gullible still believe them.

  21. Colin,
    ” a doctor blamed for the deaths of up to 650 patients”

    It is somewhat perverse that patients are not permitted to elect for euthenasia, yet doctors are financially incentivised to bump them off as fast as possible.

    Polltroll,
    “Why should that be the case, when polling shows that the vast majority of them also feel the Tories are screwing up the Brexit negotiations?”

    For the same reason remainers are sticking with labour who are also not doing anything very remainish?

  22. The usage in politics is more the indication of a trend rather than direct leading of it.

    In that respect I’m not sure anyone here is a bellwether since we’re all waaayy more politically interested than the average person.

    Also the interested tend to be more attached to their opinions so are less likely to change them.

  23. @Danny
    ‘For the same reason remainers are sticking with labour who are also not doing anything very remainish?’

    Absolutely – it appears to me that even more voters than usual are voting for the least worst option, rather than the best.

  24. Conservative MEP David Bannerman has gone a bit Michael Foot on Airbus:

    https://twitter.com/DCBMEP/status/1010122002378747905

  25. CB11

    The issue in question is the date/dates on which deliberate institutional obstruction of full examination of those deaths ocurred, and if it occurred, who caused it. The answer to that question should facilitate exposure , accountability, and resignation where appropriate.

    The issue of instructing the unlawful killing of recovering patients ,by clinicians should facilitate exposure, accountability & imprisonment where appropriate.

  26. CHARLES

    No worries-I understood your usage-the commonly accepted one.

  27. DANNY

    Was a doctor “financially incentivised” to kill them?

    Could you indicate where in the Report that is explained ?

    https://www.gosportpanel.independent.gov.uk/

  28. @Davwel

    As a casual golfer, I normally like to defend the environmental benefits of most courses, but this looks like a very poor decision. The 250 jobs promise is very dodgy.

    The truth is that golf is in serious decline as a participation sport, and we are overloaded with half-empty golf courses and clubs that are in difficulty financially.

    The economic case for another course in this location is clearly very poor, as it will simply attract players from other clubs that are struggling. It is impossible to argue that Scotland needs more golf courses in order to cope with demand or the need for choice.

    I would assess the likely economic benefit as close to nil. Good luck with your objections.

  29. @BigFatRon

    Actually the Labour hold (x3) in Willesden Green ward was a deferred election from May (Labour councillor and candidate Lesley Jones died during the campaign). The turnout was, not surprisingly, very low (25.5%)

    http://vote-2012.proboards.com/thread/11331/elections-deferred-21st-june

  30. @Shevii
    Thank you – that is one of the funniest and most ludicrous things that I have read in years…

  31. @ SJ – “However, the interesting point is whether (ha!) we’ll see formerly brexit-inclined posters here, and more generally commentators elsewhere, getting beyond the point of unease to confessing a conversion.”

    You could of course use polling info for that – you know, this being a polling forum!!

    Maybe BFR could post his analysis to show where he concludes a rise in Bregret. I know CMJ tried a while ago and even AW did on occasion call the one-off step change after the GE a ‘trend’. See ORB’s tracker here which has pretty graphs with the important dates on:
    https://www.orb-international.com/2018/06/05/orb-monthly-brexit-tracker-june-2018/

    Then there is the issue with ‘conversion’. Bregret (even if it rose) tells us nothing as it is hindsight. What matters is the plausible possibilities (scenarios) for the final outcome and unless/until we have a new GE even more importantly than that is the view of 639 MPs and the EC/EU27/EP (a lot of folks forget about that last group!)

  32. TW: You could of course use polling info for that

    How exactly could I use polling information to see “whether we’ll see formerly brexit-inclined posters here, and more generally commentators elsewhere, getting beyond the point of unease to confessing a conversion”?

    The discussion was about bellwethers, ie opinion formers and leaders, and whether they might confess to changing their minds about the wisdom of brexit. It was not about general opinion.

  33. @TW
    Er, it was in the Survation poll that you yourself posted?!

    Of course ‘Bregret’ tells us something about the opinions of voters – that’s the point of an opinion poll. If you don’t think opinion polls are of value, why are you here?

    If what you are trying to say is that an increase in ‘Bregret’ won’t influence the course that the Tory Government takes, ‘because it is circumscribed by HoC arithmetic and internal party politics, I would agree.

    However increasing ‘Bregret’ COULD lead to a number of electoral reactions; you could make an argument for any of increasing weakness in Tory certainty to vote, direct switching Tory to Labour, firming of Labour vote as Brexiteers veer toward ‘Bregret’, Tory ‘Bregreters’ switching to LDems, or Labour ‘Bregreters’ opting for a more hard-core remain LDems or Scot Nats, or even more LDems or Nats switching to Labour as the best chance of minimising Brexit damage.

    It is one of the few things that looks capable of moving VI, so it would seem odd if – on a polling site – we didn’t keep an eye on it, yes?

  34. @Shevii

    as we only make wings in the UK it may be that we would require EU immigration to obtain the skills to make the rest of the aircraft in order to facilitate that plan :-)

  35. I would be astonished if many more of my fellow Leavers did not follow Allan Christie in wanting out.

    The government’s approach to negotiation has been to accept that the EU can dictate terms. That is pretty much the opinion of most of the Commons.

    It is hard to be enthusiastic about a cause prosecuted in such a way.

    The choice will be between full surrender and thinly veiled surrender. Or full surrender or all out economic war for which we haven’t prepared.

    To say May has done badly in the negotiations is an understatement.

  36. Colin,
    I havnt read the report, but it is pretty obvious doctors and particularly hospitals are incentivised to bump off severely ill patients, especially the old. The easiest way to meet government targets is to ensure the most expensive and resource consuming die quickly. Of course administrators will turn a blind eye, their jobs and pensions depend on doing so.

    its just the same as giving schools attainment targets and then finding they refuse to allow kids to enter exams who would pull down their average score, exclude poor performers, concentrate resources on the middle group whose scores might be brought above threshold while ignoring the rest

  37. @Joseph

    Two points:

    May isn’t doing the negotiating. It would be truer to say Davies is doing badly, a wholly predictable outcome considering his lack of work ethic and talent.

    Also, the Govts hands are tied as it is at the mercy of nihilist factions who block every attempt to find sensible solutions.
    It ought to have told Rees-Mogg and Grieve alike to shut up or face explusion, but the crucial point of this story is this has never at any point been about the national interest, it has been about a civil war in the Conservative Party and the attempts to keep the party together.

  38. Joseph 18 32,
    Trumps trade war is gathering pace. It is how things will continue. Life outside a large trading block will become increasingly icy. Leavers keep quoting stats about the uk poor trading performance but all that tells us is the uk is ill prepared for a trade war.

    All may has done is play the miserable hand she has been given with predicted consequences.

  39. DANNY

    @”I havnt read the report”

    I thought as much-so will ignore your assertion.

  40. A fascinating account of the death throes of a 70 year old political partnership.

    The coming weeks in German politics could be seismic.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/migrant-policy-conflict-could-spell-the-end-for-merkel-a-1214503.html

  41. @ Joseph

    “To say May has done badly in the negotiations is an understatement.”

    Rare Brexit comment from me. I wouldn’t disagree with that for a moment, but there are two further questions I would ask. Firstly could anyone else have actually done much better, or is it just an almost impossible task? And secondly, if someone else could have done better (presumably a keen Brexiteer), why haven’t they stepped up to the plate to take over? They just want someone else to take the blame?

    Back to polls. The BMG one was interesting, not that I believe Lab have taken back the lead, but it does suggest that the Con lead is still rather slim, otherwise MOE wouldn’t be able to give this result. The two recent extremes (+7 to CON and +3 to LAB) continues to suggest the best estimate is around +2 to CON. Last night’s locals were quite interesting too, since many were in what would typically be thought of as Con heartlands. The drift in those was generally away from Cons (including two loses). But difficult to say much really, local factors and swing all depends when the last vote took place.

  42. The time honoured EU Can Kicking method of decision making looks like running out of road on this one:-

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-europe-migrants-germany-merkel/merkel-plays-down-chances-of-breakthrough-in-eu-migration-talks-idUKKBN1JI181

    Rock & a Very Hard Place for Merkel.

  43. I posted the following on the last page of the previous thread on Thursday morning……..

    JIM JAM

    You’re probably right that DANNY’s theory was overoptimistic.

    What seems to be the current May position is simply kicking the can down the road, if necessary with extended transition, until the next GE looms.

    What Grieve’s pantomime has created is a situation where neither remainders nor leavers can stop the HMG plan, whatever it happens to be, short of losing an FTPA confidence vote.

    Somehow, I doubt that this was a coincidence.

    …………………..

    Given that Grieve ended up not voting for his own amendment, I can’t help wondering whether the whole pantomime wasn’t agreed with May to prevent re:smog & co being allowed to interfere.

  44. TRIGGUY

    Excellent response to JOSEPH1832.

  45. Somerjohn

    “However, the interesting point is whether (ha!) we’ll see formerly brexit-inclined posters here, and more generally commentators elsewhere, getting beyond the point of unease to confessing a conversion.”

    How about As Airbus threatens to leave the UK, @Nigel_Farage admits “Brexit done badly will leave us in a worse position than we were in before, Brexit on its own isn’t some magic cure.” (ITV)

    or Welsh FM Carwyn Jones backs Scottish Government in row over Withdrawal Bill. Tells @bbccscotlandnews UK government shouldn’t be able to push through laws without consent. (BBC)

  46. @TRIGGUY

    “To say May has done badly in the negotiations is an understatement.”

    Rare Brexit comment from me. I wouldn’t disagree with that for a moment, but there are two further questions I would ask. Firstly could anyone else have actually done much better, or is it just an almost impossible task? And secondly, if someone else could have done better (presumably a keen Brexiteer), why haven’t they stepped up to the plate to take over? They just want someone else to take the blame?

    I think you have asked the right questions here whilst I do not subscribe to DANNY’s conspiracy theories. I do think that all sides in the debate did not understand what they were debating come the EU referendum. Much of the debate whilst sounding like it was about the EU was essentially more about our dissatisfaction with the state of things. That was my conclusion when I campaigned on the doorstep for remain and that was surprisingly the conclusion that Lord Ashcroft came to when he reviewed the polls.

    The real debate was between social conservatives against social liberals indeed a debate that has raged in the US for sometime such that it has become tribal is slowly permeating across to the UK and dare I say it Europe as well.

    The reality was that the those that voted leave are such a diverse coalition that the only thing they do agree on is that they want to leave. What is more this coalition does not want to take responsibility for it which is why although 80% of tories members voted to leave by most polls Tory MP are hesitant about what they want and how they are going to get it.

    Now the UK could have gone for more brinkmanship but I think that EU has been pretty tough when faced with that as I have said several times that we rarely understand the EU or even the member states our politicians don’t understand it, (David Davis tweet about going to berlin and sorting it out with Germany attests to that (how is he even doing the negotiation).

    I and many other have predicted that we will be in this position because no one from the leave camp want the job of PM and negotiator of Brexit.

    Now had May held her stnce of the red lines, I would have thought we’d be put out of our misery early. May would be gone and the next man up would have a ‘clean’ sheet but what happened was the EU has called the UK bluff at every turn. At the moment there is paralysis everywhere.

    Our politicians are follower of opinion not opinion former’s and thus are waiting for the Electorate to break one way or the other. The electorate have an inkling that Brexit is not going to be good but don’t want to say it was a bad idea and hence in spite of bad news for Broughton people are sticking to their guns. At some point reality will take care of itself but I remember Iraq and it took a long time for those that said it was a bad idea to prove how bad it was and as usual by the time that people realized we had all taken the shattered parts of our lives and moved on.

    Until the electorate moves decisively one way or the other (be it that we believe in unicorns and they turn out to be real or it is all a disaster and we go back to the EU, what will happen is at some point it would be common knowledge that it was a good/bad idea and would be almost discounted in political discourse.

    Politicians need voters votes you never tell the voter he is plain wrong and in this case we have to accept either remainers or leavers are plain wrong.

    I have 3 hour drive back to Bristol from Stoke so this a depressing situation to be pondering on. Well at least Nigeria won.

  47. OLDNAT

    Farage was on both Sky News & the BBC around lunchtime making very similar remarks. Oddly, however, he made no suggestions re what should have been done.

  48. Some data for arguments – demography, migration and alike.

    Quite interesting and revealing. Seems to be solid methodologically.

    Politically it is so massive that parties haven’t come any close to think about it, hence all the 20th century analogies. Eventually they will have to. I read a reasonable study on African migration (I hope it will be published – so that it is known, and the authors get a recognition) that suggests that around 2 trillion dollars investment would be sufficient t to stop African migration up to 2040.

    By the way, for natural conservationists – There is only one species of humans around (Homo Sapiens sapiens.

    http://www.populationeurope.org

  49. @BARBAZENZERO

    As I said above the people that supported Iraq blamed the problem on implementation rather than the idea. They will snie from the sidelines that ‘if were you ………I would not do it like that’

  50. PASSTHEROCKPLEASE @ BZ

    Agreed that there will be much greeting if May has truly come to the conclusion that neither she nor the Chevening 3 can implement a leave process.

    OTOH, if brexit does happen the house prices around Filton will drop like a stone.

1 2 3 4 25