Uxbridge & Ruislip South

2015 Result:
Conservative: 22511 (50.4%)
Labour: 11816 (26.4%)
Lib Dem: 2215 (5%)
Green: 1414 (3.2%)
UKIP: 6346 (14.2%)
TUSC: 180 (0.4%)
Loony: 72 (0.2%)
Independent: 14 (0%)
Others: 120 (0.3%)
MAJORITY: 10695 (23.9%)

Category: Very safe Conservative seat

Geography: Greater London. Part of Hillingdon council area.

Main population centres: Uxbridge, Hillingdon, Cowley, Yiewsley, South Ruislip.

Profile: A suburban seat on the fringe of west London, this covers Uxbridge, Hillingdon, Cowley and Yiewsley and then, north of Northolt Aerodrome which runs down the middle of the seat, South Ruislip.This is middle-of-the-road suburbia, hidden away at the end at the far end of the Metropolitan line.

Politics: A relatively safe Conservative seat, it has seen held by the Conservatives since 1970 but not always by large majorities. In 1997 this became the first by-election hold for the Conservatives for 18 years when John Randall was returned following the death of Michael Shersby, the first time the Tories had held a seat at a by-election since William Hague held Richmond in 1989. Since 2015 it has been the new seat of Boris Johnson, elected MP while still serving as London Mayor.


Current MP
BORIS JOHNSON (Conservative) Born 1964, New York, son of former MEP Stanley Johnson. Educated at Eton and Oxford University. Former journalist, author and editor of the Spectator. MP for Henley 2001-2008, Mayor of London since 2008. First elected as MP for Uxbridge & Ruislip South in 2015. Shadow higher education minister 2005-2007. Instantly recognisable by his dishevelled appearance, blond thatch of hair and bumbling public-schoolboy mannerisms, Boris Johnson has become a media celebrity through appearances on Have I Got News For You and a tendency to make gaffes. His first period as an MP saw a brief shadow ministerial career cut short by denials of an affair that turned out to be true and he resigned from Parliament to become Mayor of London. In 2014 he announced he would seek to return to Parliament with the barely disguised ambition to stand as the next party leader.
Past Results
2010
Con: 21758 (48%)
Lab: 10542 (23%)
LDem: 8995 (20%)
BNP: 1396 (3%)
Oth: 2385 (5%)
MAJ: 11216 (25%)
2005*
Con: 16840 (49%)
Lab: 10669 (31%)
LDem: 4544 (13%)
BNP: 763 (2%)
Oth: 1562 (5%)
MAJ: 6171 (18%)
2001
Con: 15751 (47%)
Lab: 13653 (41%)
LDem: 3426 (10%)
UKIP: 588 (2%)
MAJ: 2098 (6%)
1997
Con: 18095 (44%)
Lab: 17371 (42%)
LDem: 4528 (11%)
Oth: 398 (1%)
MAJ: 724 (2%)

*There were boundary changes after 2005, name changed from Uxbridge

Demographics
2015 Candidates
BORIS JOHNSON (Conservative) Born 1964, New York, son of former MEP Stanley Johnson. Educated at Eton and Oxford University. Journalist and author, former editor of the Spectator. MP for Henley 2001-2008, Mayor of London since 2008. Shadow higher education minister 2005-2007. Instantly recognisable by his dishevelled appearance, blond thatch of hair and bumbling public-schoolboy mannerisms, Boris Johnson has become a media celebrity through appearances on Have I Got News For You and a tendency to make gaffes. His first period as an MP saw a brief shadow ministerial career cut short by denials of an affair that turned out to be true and he resigned from Parliament to become Mayor of London. In 2014 he announced he would seek to return to Parliament with the barely disguised ambition to stand as the next party leader.
CHRIS SUMMERS (Labour) BBC journalist. Ealing councillor since 2010.
MICHAEL COX (Liberal Democrat) Educated at Salesian Missionary College and Brunel University. Chartered accountant. Hillingdon councillor 2002-2010. Contested Ruislip Northwood 2001, 2005, Uxbridge and South Ruislip 2010.
JACK DUFFIN (UKIP) Educated at Stratton Upper School and Brunel University. student.
GRAHAM LEE (Green)
SABRINA MOOSUN (Communities United)
JENNY THOMPSON (Independent)
MICHAEL DOHERTY (Independent)
LORD TOBY JUG (Eccentric Party of GB) Musician. Contested West Ham 1992, 1997, Folkstone and Hythe 2005, Huntingdon 2010.
JANE LAWRENCE (Realists)
JAMES JACKSON (No description) Retired auditor.
GARY HARBORD (TUSC)
HOWLING LAUD HOPE (Loony) Born 1942, Mytchett, real name Alan Hope. Publican. Contested Teignbridge 1983, 1987, 1992, Aldershot 1997, Eddisbury 1999, Kensington and Chelsea 1999, Brent East 2003, Hartlepool 2004, Aldershot 2005, Blaenau Gwent 2006, Sedgefield 2007, Norwich North 2009, Witney 2010, Barnsley Central 2011, Bradford West 2012, Manchester Central 2012, Eastleigh 2013, South Shields 2013, Clacton 2014.
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Comments - 1,614 Responses on “Uxbridge & Ruislip South”
  1. “TLDR there’s a difference between legally enforcing death on someone and legally giving someone that choice”

    So the unborn child isn’t having death legally enforced upon it? What choice is it able to exercise?

    BTW I am not opposed to abortion being legal, though the current number of abortions taking place is monstrous (about 25% of all pregnancies, IIRC). I am simply pointing out that liberals moralising about the evils of capital punishment whilst being enthusiastic pro-choice advocates and military interventionists are hypocrites. There are plenty of solid arguments against capital punishment but “the state has no right to take life” really isn’t one of them, given that the state takes away lives on a daily basis.

  2. You are right on this, Hemmy. It’s a circle I find difficult to square myself. For all its failings, at least the Catholic Church is consistent on this one.

  3. Hemmy: in regards to your comments on my inconsistencies, my considered view is that humanitarian military interventon is designed to prevent future deaths, whereas capital punishment retaliates for past ones. A grim but unavoidable moral calculus geared towards saving the maximum number of lives means that I advocate the former but not the latter. If killing murderers somehow magically brought their victims back to life then the same logic would put me in favour of it.

  4. HH – true and not just on abortion.

    The most vociferous defenders of eg the Lpool Care Pathway or indeed any NHS scandal are always the Left.

    I’m always amused that many on the Left who deride the establishment always side with them if it’s the NHS or BBC or lawyers. You may have spotted Dr (now a retired but hon Prof) Ashton pop up on the News. He’s a Labour party member in Liverpool and the guy who saved Blair’s skin at the height of the fuel crisis. As a public health official he doesn’t just think the State knows best, he thinks that he and his officials should head up things and that the Sec of State for Health is wrong to do chair Cobra meetings! That would be even less accountable than China.

    The only time an interviewer got the better of him, was when he was asked when he last treated a patient. IIRC it was in the 1970s! So he’s a medic in the sense that personal injury medico legal “ooh ahh” whiplash Drs are who rent rooms in Rodney St and Harley St. Pure leaches on insurance premiums etc.

  5. There’s never much consistency in such subjects but I actually oppose the death penalty, voluntarily euthanasia and abortion, the latter in nearly all but extreme circumstance – the mother was raped or her life is endangered by being pregnant.

    And none of it is for religious reasons. I think on the whole abortion is arguably worst than the death penalty as the victim (the baby) has done nothing wrong – and that’s the sort of statement you usually hear from those on the religious right.

    Broadly one of few things I – along with most of the public – do support Johnson on is his approach to crime – but he needs to start by building more prisons and recruiting more staff because jails are not doing their jobs in rehabilitating felons

  6. That’s pretty close to my views as well.

    Appalling though it is that abortion is used so much as mere contraception, I accept that this use of it could never be outlawed without bringing back Dickensian back street abortions etc which would be worse.

    On balance I think I oppose the reintroduction of capital punishment, mostly because of the risk of miscarriage of justice. Nevertheless were the Harold Shipmans and Myra Hindleys of this country to have dangled from a rope, you would have seen no tears from me.

    Fury over rising crime is one of the less-mentioned motivations which pushed a lot of northern voters to Boris (ironically, after 9 years of Tory government, but Corbyn’s approach really jarred with people). Boris has got to deliver on this, and the NHS.

  7. I guess for abortion, my reasoning for supporting abortion is that, being part of the despised patriarchy, it is not a decision I would ever have to make for myself, and it isn’t right for me to make such a deeply personal decision on someone else’s behalf. It’s for the individual to make that judgement – which is why the position is called pro-choice rather than pro-abortion.

    But yeah, I don’t think people who disagree with me on this are “wrong” in a moral sense. It is merely an accident of history that those who oppose abortion happen generally to support other socially conservative causes which are, to me at least, much more obviously wrong, and so pro-lifers have ended up on the wrong side of history.

    And this is important because the low-status nature of pro-life views is stopping from those who enjoy cultural hegemony from asking the right questions. Hemmy is right that the abortion rate is scarily high, and nobody’s asking why – that’s really big social problem because excising a human foetus is a pretty extreme thing to do, and in a healthy society far fewer would. It’s not that the abortions themselves are a problem, but they must point to some deeper malaise.

    And the same is true of divorces. Both abortion and divorce are extremely traumatic experiences, and I’m probably in a minority these days to have grown up in a family that has never had to contend with either. I don’t want millions of families to go through this trauma. I want a society where people aren’t forced to make these horrible choices (or indeed to not make them and live with the consequences that way).

  8. Given a fetus does not have the capcity to make any choices I’m not sure you could give it the choice of whether to be aborted or not.

    I personally would not have an abortion but as I’m not a woman and never likely to be pregnant I never will make that choice. I’ve made it clear to my other half my feelings but should she ever feel like she has to make that choice that is hers to make I have no right to stop her nor imo does the state.

    As for capital punishment I too sympathise with the idea that given 1 in 10 on death row are found to be innocent it seems fairly concerning that that many innocent people could be at risk of being executed. I also feel as a tax payer that we should get what we pay for and while executing serial muderers will keep us safe at night I personally feel I pay into a system that incarcerates people to keep us safe, what am i paying into it for if thats not happening

  9. “I guess for abortion, my reasoning for supporting abortion is that, being part of the despised patriarchy, it is not a decision I would ever have to make for myself”

    “I’ve made it clear to my other half my feelings but should she ever feel like she has to make that choice that is hers to make I have no right to stop her nor imo does the state.”

    I don’t disagree with you both that it’s a woman’s final decision in the end, but as co-creator of life the father deserves a big say as well (and quid pro-quo should offer unqualified support for bringing up the baby, no matter what the circumstances of the conception).

    On crime, we are likely to see a big increase in people sentenced to whole-life terms, be they either terrorists too dangerous to ever release, or hideous murderers. In such cases it might even be compassionate to offer some form of voluntary suicide rather than spend a whole life behind bars.

    In other news, Ken Clarke and Phillip Hammond both given peerages. Good on yer Boris for ignoring Cummings’ vengeful streak just this once.

  10. I don’t think governments should be in the business of taking life in this type of way – obviously things like wars are different – and whilst British juries aren’t quite as naive as American ones in taking everything the police say as gospel, I don’t think we should bow to life-serving prisoners who want a way out of their permanent incarceration – far more of a punishment to keep them alive – such as happened in the case of the repugnant Ian Brady. The only argument for keeping him alive is that he wanted to die

  11. “and whilst British juries aren’t quite as naive as American ones in taking everything the police say as gospel”

    Juries might also be less likely to convict a stereotypically sympathetic defendant (say, a very pretty young white woman) if she is likely to face the death penalty.

    I doubt even the most blimpish of Colonel Blimps takes everything the police say as gospel any more, which is both good and bad. I’d say in many cases the right are even more disbelieving of the police than the left, these days.

  12. Very true on the last point.

    The reason the Asian grooming gangs were not pursued by GMP was a mixture of ineptitude and liberalism of previous Ch Cons Fahy.

    Indeed it’s only by accident that the recent Asian rapist of 200+ straight men was caught. GMP actually arrested his victim for punching him! [Only because the drugged and confused victim mistakenly picked up an old phone of the assailant – which GMP then checked – was the footage found of his attacks]

    As Graham Stringer commented, on recent evidence, if there is a serial killer canal pusher [for those unaware 106 bodies 90% of which were males aged 18-40 have been found in water in Manchester over the past 8 years] it’ll take GMP 20 years to admit so!

  13. I think what happened in Manchester, Rotherham, Rochdale and Oldham is the biggest indictment of Labour-run councils then anything the loonie Left did in Liverpool and London during the 1980s. And fair play to Labour Mps like Sarah Champion who have been willing to call this out

    And the Police – which is precisely why – as Hemelig said earlier – those on the Right today seem to be as disillusioned with the police as those on the Left

    And of course the social workers who never, ever seem to learn from identical mistakes made in the past time and time again

  14. I agree (of course) although from what both Stringer and other former Leaders of MCC have said – it was the Council Officers at fault not the City Cllrs.

    They both took the decision not to act and failed to inform the Council Leaders.

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