Uxbridge & Ruislip South

2015 Result:
Conservative: 22511 (50.4%)
Labour: 11816 (26.4%)
Lib Dem: 2215 (5%)
Green: 1414 (3.2%)
UKIP: 6346 (14.2%)
TUSC: 180 (0.4%)
Loony: 72 (0.2%)
Independent: 14 (0%)
Others: 120 (0.3%)
MAJORITY: 10695 (23.9%)

Category: Very safe Conservative seat

Geography: Greater London. Part of Hillingdon council area.

Main population centres: Uxbridge, Hillingdon, Cowley, Yiewsley, South Ruislip.

Profile: A suburban seat on the fringe of west London, this covers Uxbridge, Hillingdon, Cowley and Yiewsley and then, north of Northolt Aerodrome which runs down the middle of the seat, South Ruislip.This is middle-of-the-road suburbia, hidden away at the end at the far end of the Metropolitan line.

Politics: A relatively safe Conservative seat, it has seen held by the Conservatives since 1970 but not always by large majorities. In 1997 this became the first by-election hold for the Conservatives for 18 years when John Randall was returned following the death of Michael Shersby, the first time the Tories had held a seat at a by-election since William Hague held Richmond in 1989. Since 2015 it has been the new seat of Boris Johnson, elected MP while still serving as London Mayor.


Current MP
BORIS JOHNSON (Conservative) Born 1964, New York, son of former MEP Stanley Johnson. Educated at Eton and Oxford University. Former journalist, author and editor of the Spectator. MP for Henley 2001-2008, Mayor of London since 2008. First elected as MP for Uxbridge & Ruislip South in 2015. Shadow higher education minister 2005-2007. Instantly recognisable by his dishevelled appearance, blond thatch of hair and bumbling public-schoolboy mannerisms, Boris Johnson has become a media celebrity through appearances on Have I Got News For You and a tendency to make gaffes. His first period as an MP saw a brief shadow ministerial career cut short by denials of an affair that turned out to be true and he resigned from Parliament to become Mayor of London. In 2014 he announced he would seek to return to Parliament with the barely disguised ambition to stand as the next party leader.
Past Results
2010
Con: 21758 (48%)
Lab: 10542 (23%)
LDem: 8995 (20%)
BNP: 1396 (3%)
Oth: 2385 (5%)
MAJ: 11216 (25%)
2005*
Con: 16840 (49%)
Lab: 10669 (31%)
LDem: 4544 (13%)
BNP: 763 (2%)
Oth: 1562 (5%)
MAJ: 6171 (18%)
2001
Con: 15751 (47%)
Lab: 13653 (41%)
LDem: 3426 (10%)
UKIP: 588 (2%)
MAJ: 2098 (6%)
1997
Con: 18095 (44%)
Lab: 17371 (42%)
LDem: 4528 (11%)
Oth: 398 (1%)
MAJ: 724 (2%)

*There were boundary changes after 2005, name changed from Uxbridge

Demographics
2015 Candidates
BORIS JOHNSON (Conservative) Born 1964, New York, son of former MEP Stanley Johnson. Educated at Eton and Oxford University. Journalist and author, former editor of the Spectator. MP for Henley 2001-2008, Mayor of London since 2008. Shadow higher education minister 2005-2007. Instantly recognisable by his dishevelled appearance, blond thatch of hair and bumbling public-schoolboy mannerisms, Boris Johnson has become a media celebrity through appearances on Have I Got News For You and a tendency to make gaffes. His first period as an MP saw a brief shadow ministerial career cut short by denials of an affair that turned out to be true and he resigned from Parliament to become Mayor of London. In 2014 he announced he would seek to return to Parliament with the barely disguised ambition to stand as the next party leader.
CHRIS SUMMERS (Labour) BBC journalist. Ealing councillor since 2010.
MICHAEL COX (Liberal Democrat) Educated at Salesian Missionary College and Brunel University. Chartered accountant. Hillingdon councillor 2002-2010. Contested Ruislip Northwood 2001, 2005, Uxbridge and South Ruislip 2010.
JACK DUFFIN (UKIP) Educated at Stratton Upper School and Brunel University. student.
GRAHAM LEE (Green)
SABRINA MOOSUN (Communities United)
JENNY THOMPSON (Independent)
MICHAEL DOHERTY (Independent)
LORD TOBY JUG (Eccentric Party of GB) Musician. Contested West Ham 1992, 1997, Folkstone and Hythe 2005, Huntingdon 2010.
JANE LAWRENCE (Realists)
JAMES JACKSON (No description) Retired auditor.
GARY HARBORD (TUSC)
HOWLING LAUD HOPE (Loony) Born 1942, Mytchett, real name Alan Hope. Publican. Contested Teignbridge 1983, 1987, 1992, Aldershot 1997, Eddisbury 1999, Kensington and Chelsea 1999, Brent East 2003, Hartlepool 2004, Aldershot 2005, Blaenau Gwent 2006, Sedgefield 2007, Norwich North 2009, Witney 2010, Barnsley Central 2011, Bradford West 2012, Manchester Central 2012, Eastleigh 2013, South Shields 2013, Clacton 2014.
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Comments - 1,669 Responses on “Uxbridge & Ruislip South”
  1. Ten years of cruel austerity leading to many tens of thousands of deaths / suicides now being shown to be unnecessary and politically ideological, as many on the Left of the Labour party pointed out – some very early on their period of power…

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/aug/23/jeremy-corbyn-reminded-labour-austerity-must-be-opposed

  2. And now The Bank of England pumping in another £200 billion in quantitative easing, taking QE to £645 billion since 2009.

  3. Cuts to which benefit do you think caused deaths? Mortgage interest relief at source or the ending of sending child benefit to claimants overseas? Because I’ve checked and they were the only benefits that were terminated. All others in fact increased by RPI pa for most of the ‘austerity’ period of DC/GO.

    Because Frank Field as select committee chairman pointed out that it was more often than not errors and omissions by the DWP and local councils that did.

    Life expectancy has continued to rise, as the more recent report showed.

  4. Just floating this out there at the moment: what do people think of the idea of a Government of National Unity? Both in terms of whether they like the idea and whether they think it will happen?

  5. (For me, the answers are yes, and no, respectively.)

  6. Sounds like a good idea. If even to stop some trying to make hay out of the situation. Hasn’t exactly worked wonders in Northern Ireland though

  7. Deepthroat will be mighty disappointed to learn today that those working in financial services are indeed essential key workers.

    Personally I think it’s scandalous that so many GPs retired at 55, so recalling them makes perfect sense.

    PT – a decent idea, but you could argue that’s what we now have with Tories representing all regions. If it’d have happened under May, I suspect only Frank Field would have joined to help the Govt & DUP etc. Although to be fair to them the SNP have been statesmenlike unlike Corbyn & McDonnell – who, of course, can’t be invited to anything due to their age!

  8. No surprise that the Conservatives view financial services staff as essential!

    Now the Govt will pay the wages of employees! Imo They should introduce Universal Basic Income now. £800 to £1000 per month for all people over 18. And keep UBI.

    Also rent reductions should be legislated for , in respect of landlords who have 3 or more properties. Either that or drastically increase the relatively low income tax on rental income. There’s far too many landlords who are very well off and too many (mainly young) people struggling because of rent levels.

  9. UBI is a good idea when we’re hitting 20% unemployment. It is not a good idea in normal times, when a more targeted benefits system (though more generous than we currently have) is preferable.

    These radical measures destroy economies. The only reason they are suddenly a good idea is that we are having to destroy economies anyway in order to fight this virus.

    2020 is going to be the worst year ever. It is therefore somewhat perverse to argue that all the emergencies introduced during it are good long-term policies.

  10. Bank workers are essential workers, even more so during these times. Telephone banking was up 35% yesterday and you’d complain if there was no cash in the ATMs.

    Mayors, Cllrs and Officers aren’t, of course, key workers – but that hasn’t stopped them spouting off on the broadcast media.

    Giving an extra £20 per week to all on Tax Credits isn’t essential, but is welcome. Although tv has been full of ‘creatives’ moaning that they can no longer teach cheese making online to disabled Irish speakers and that’s somehow the fault of corona.

    In the same way there was no need to ban evictions, as County Courts will close for 3 months – but it allays people’s fears.

    PT – untrue. All of the evidence is that there’s no lack of demand. It’s merely surged to supermarkets, utilities, Amazon etc. Once people are let out, spending in restaurants will be higher than it otherwise would have been.

  11. Replenishing ATMs are not carried out by bank workers. Call centre staff I would agree are in a lot cases can be viewed as essential staff. Which is odd, as they are often the most harrassed and most poorly paid employees. (I know someone who works in a bank call centre who despite working there since 2007 was still on just 10% above the minimum wage in 2018 when she.left in disgust. This sort of treatment of staff is commonplace ).

    LO: “In the same way there was no need to ban evictions, as County Courts will close for 3 months – but it allays people’s fears.”

    So cold, calculating and perfunctory – a horrible statement. Have you no compassion? Do you realise how terrifying for most people the threat of evictions are? How much knock on damage it creates for society?

  12. “All of the evidence is that there’s no lack of demand. It’s merely surged to supermarkets, utilities, Amazon etc.”

    I doubt the thousands of recently redundant air stewards in this country will be greatly comforted by the fact that *some* sectors are doing okay. Even if demand across the entire economy is holding up (and I don’t think it is), in certain sectors it is now zero. The employees in those sectors have to be thought about. (And there is a discussion to be had about shareholders, which I personally find a tricky one. On the one hand they took a gamble and lost, and you don’t refund losing lottery tickets. On the other, if you ever want anyone to invest in anything again after all this is over…)

    “In the same way there was no need to ban evictions, as County Courts will close for 3 months – but it allays people’s fears.”

    Look, if Deepthroat’s bleeding heart language isn’t to your taste, here’s a more pragmatic argument. If people are made to feel like they will be evicted – even if that would not actually happen in practice – they are going to continue to go to work when it isn’t safe to do so. And travel of any kind right now has dire negative externalities that we should be avoiding at all costs.

  13. A Govt can ‘ban’ whatever it likes – I was simply making the obvious practical point that it’s a wasted law.

    Bank workers do indeed fill ATMs – those within banks anyhow. Just not those new ones you see outside, which I avoid anyway as they charge and always seem to be in dodgy areas.

    PT – you can think whatever you like. It doesn’t alter the fact that demand is actually up in many sectors and the same in others. Hence the extra £1.2 Billion in food purchased, extra £200m from garden centres, increase in broadband. Some will in fact have more disposable income, because there’s fewer places to spend it in Costa etc.

    As for redundant Flybe staff – they’ll be paid PILON as Thomas Cook & Monarch staff were before them. But there’s been no competitive loss of industry % share of the market as no-one else is flying, so we absolutely should not bail out Virgin etc. They can all take off again after people are allowed to fly again in Sep or whenever.

  14. “2020 is going to be the worst year ever”

    Just popping in to call out this ridiculous hyperbole, which does nobody any good.

    Yes there are many people suffering loss of earnings and sadly a few hundred deaths so far. Yes that will rise substantially but it’s still hardly unprecedented.

    For many more people, things are no more inconvenient than being stuck in the house working at home and having to look after the kids (like an early summer holidays where you can’t go out much). But the worst year ever? Hardly. And you insult the memory of people who lived through the Blitz etc by saying that.

    Indeed for many people the 3 day week and winter of discontent would have felt worse than this…at least there are no power cuts (touch wood) and much more extensive government help available for lost income. Where I grew up the miners’ strike felt worse than this.

  15. A welcome injection of perspective.

    In some ways it’s become a wonderful thing, the world has become so much more peaceful: no more the tyranny of crazy horses roaring past your house spewing out their poisonous fumes; no more maddening noise from the iron creatures in the sky; respite for fish and birds in our rivers and canals; a break for many from alcohol; many rediscovering the joy of reading books…

    There’ll be some peculiar stats when this is over one guesses: domestic burglaries will be down hugely and street crime; RTAs…? One hopes not self harm because of the self isolation but we should not be surprised if suicides are up.

    Just another thought – Johnson is very lucky from a political sense that this came in the first few months of his premiership. Because of the GE honeymoon maybe, he’s been given an easy ride despite showing a few signs of being out if his depth. When we come out of it – and assuming he hasnt cocked it up! – his political sheen will likely be enhanced massively.

  16. HH – good to hear from you and I agree entirely. Up here food shortages were worse during the fuel crisis in 2000 (when we ran out of milk, bread & eggs first and of course re-deliveries could not take place).

    Incidentally, Parliament is to officially close for a month from today – but I can see it being for 2 or 3 months, as with the County Courts.

    On the plus side: milkmen are back in fashion, GPs have been forced into the 21st century with online sick notes (although I note A&E doesn’t want GPs joining them), people are gardening and doing all of those DIY jobs put off for months. Oh and Bet365 are paying all staff full pay ’til August (because it isn’t their fault that Varadkar just banned Irish racing, even though it was already being held behind closed doors). I see the places without any or with very few cases remain the unfashionable places the London media hate: Hartlepool, NE Lincs, Knowsley + 50. I hope the Western Isles remain disease free and I agreed with their decision to only allow residents to use ferries to all islands. I also agreed with the Welsh grievance, although clearly it was anti-English Plaid areas that spray painted Range Rovers of tourists.

    The worst areas seem to be Hampshire and Inner London, but then the Tube and hospitals may have spread it (as well as ski-ers from Italy). We’ve still had zero cases in N Sefton but then other than an OAP returning from a cruise ship, Southport folk tend not to be very cosmopolitan and we don’t have int students here.

    Hope all keep safe and well and it’s actually 17C and sunny here which makes a pleasant change.

  17. Deepthroat: I’m not convinced by your argument; I think this damages Johnson in the long run, even if Britain does relatively okay (which could mean “only” 50,000 deaths). Churchill lost in 1945, after all, and many of the wartime measures were popular enough that they stayed in place long into peacetime – rationing didn’t end until 1954.

    Whatever happens now, things won’t go *back* to normal afterwards. There will be changes. I’m not sure what these changes will be, but the Conservative 2019 manifesto is now just a historical artefact, to be honest. (As, for that matter, is the 2019 Labour manifesto, despite the protestations of the usual suspects.)

    There will be a new political settlement after this, for sure. And I know people said that about the 2008 financial crisis, but this time we really are all in it together, because this, unlike the last recession, is a threat from which you can’t selectively shield a political constituency, as the Conservatives largely did in 2010.

  18. “many of the wartime measures were popular enough that they stayed in place long into peacetime – rationing didn’t end until 1954.”

    That’s an utterly daft thing to say. Rationing was exceptionally unpopular after the war, as any history book will tell you. The Tories’ manifesto promise to end rationing arguably won them the 1951 election, and when they were finally able to do so in 1954 it was arguably a major factor in Eden’s 1955 landslide.

    I know Johnson brings this on himself with his Churchillian rhetoric but trying to equate this with WW2 is absurd. The worst of it will last a few months, not six years. There are no bombs raining down on us and no evil dictator is poised to invade.

    Yes there will be lasting impacts on the way we do things but this is always the case after an economic shock. Some of the changes will be good, as outlined by Lancs and Deepthroat above. Especially for the environment, as we will fly and cruise less for a long time IMO.

    Economically, one positive compared with the 2008 crash is that the impact on the world has been staggered rather than all countries crashing at exactly the same time. Just as the west is entering the worst period of the pandemic now, China is recovering very fast and a very large pent-up demand will be released into the economy there over the summer. We will probably go through a similar stage later in the year.

  19. True – plus no country has crashed. Shares rose 11% yesterday (historically the biggest risers’ days always tend to follow within 10 days of the largest fall days)

    I repeat there is no lack of demand: it’s simply been artificially stifled. Hence the surge in sums spent and not just on food and essentials. On DIY, gardening, books, takeaways, alcohol etc. Numbers working from home apparently rose again to almost 60%.

    Those who are idle appear to be taxi drivers and GPs (although I note that A&Es apparently don’t want the latter either)

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