South East Euro Candidates 2014

The South East returns ten MEPs, the largest region in the UK. In 2009 it returned four Conservative MEPs, two UKIP, two Liberal Democrats, one Green and one Labour. Marta Andreasen, the second UKIP MEP, defected to the Conservatives after falling out with Nigel Farage and will stand on the Conservative list at this election. Full results for 2009 are here.

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ANNELIESE DODDS (Labour) Born 1978, Scotland. Educated at Oxford University. University lecturer. Contested Billericay 2005, Reading East 2010.
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JOHN HOWARTH (Labour) Born 1958, Newcastle. Businessman. Berkshire councillor 1993-1998. Reading councillor 2001-2007.Contested Thames Valley 1994 European election, South East Region 1999 European election.
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EMILY WESTLEY (Labour) Born 1977, Glasgow. Educated at Sussex University. Legal secretary. Hastings councillor since 2010.
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JAMES SWINDLEHURST (Labour) Slough councillor since 2002.
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FARAH NAZEER (Labour) Born in East London. Educated at University College London. Director of External affairs for the Motor Neurone Disease Association. Newham councillor.

6. James Watkins 7. Maggie Hughes
8. Christopher Clark 9. Karen Landles
10. Tracey Hill
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DAN HANNAN (Conservative) Born 1971, Peru. Educated at Marlborough College and Oxford University. Former journalist and speechwriter. MEP for South East England since 1999.
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NIRJ DEVA (Conservative) Born 1948, Sri Lanka. Educated at Loughborough University. MP for Brentford and Isleworth 1992-1997. MEP for South East England since 1999.. Appointed Deputy Lord Lieutenant for Greater London in 1985.
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RICHARD ASHWORTH (Conservative) Born 1947, Folkestone. Educated at Kings School Canterbury and Searle-Hayne College. Dairy farmer. Contested North Devon 1997. MEP for South East England since 1999.
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MARTA ANDREASEN (Conservative) Born 1954, Argentina. Former chief accountant of the EU, fired in 2005 for criticising EU accounting policies. MEP for South East England since 2009. Originally elected for UKIP she defected to the Conservatives in 2013 after falling out with Nigel Farage.
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RICHARD ROBINSON (Conservative) Educated at Sir Joseph Williamsons Mathematical School and Salford University. Investment consultant. Former Rochester councillor. Contested South East England 2004, 2009 European elections.

6. Graham Knight 7. Julie Marson
8. George Jeffrey 9. Rory Love
10. Adrian Pepper
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CATHERINE BEARDER (Liberal Democrat) Born 1949. Educated at St Christophers Letchworth. Former Cherwell councillor, former Oxfordshire councillor. Contested Banbury 1997, Henley 2001. Contested South East region 1999, 2005. MEP for South East England since 2009.
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ANTONY HOOK (Liberal Democrat) Born 1980. Educated at Dover Grammar School for Boys and University College London. Barrister. Contested Dover 2001, 2005. Contested South East 2009 European election.
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DINTI BATSTONE (Liberal Democrat) Educated at Rugby School and Cambridge University. Lawyer and businesswoman. Contested London 2009 European election.
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GILES GOODALL (Liberal Democrat) Born in West Sussex. Educated at Royal Hollway. Head of media at the European Commission justice department.
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IAN BEARDER (Liberal Democrat) Born 1978, Hertford Heath. Educated at Bournemouth University. Communications officer.

6. Allison Moss 7. Steven Sollitt
8. Bruce Tennent 9. John Vincent
10. Alan Bullion
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NIGEL FARAGE (UKIP) Born 1964, Farnborough. Educated at Dulwich College. Former commodity broker. Contested Itchen, Test and Avon 1994 European election, Eastleigh by-election 1994, Salisbury 1997, Bexhill and Battle 2001, South Thanet 2005, Bromley and Chislehurst 2006 by-election, Buckingham 2010. MEP for South East England since 1999. Leader of UKIP 2006-2009 and since 2010.
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JANICE ATKINSON (UKIP) Press advisor. Contested Batley and Spen 2010 for the Conservatives (as Janice Small).
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DIANE JAMES (UKIP) Healthcare consultant. Waverley councillor since 2006, originally elected as an independent. Contested Eastleigh by-election 2012.
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RAY FINCH (UKIP) Engineer. Hampshire councillor. Contested Eastleigh 2010.
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DONNA EDMUNDS (UKIP) Lewes councillor since 2011, originally elected as a Conservative. Defected to UKIP in 2013.

6. Patricia Culligan 7. Nigel Jones
8. Alan Stevens 9. Simon Strutt
10. Barry Cooper
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KEITH TAYLOR (Green) Born 1953, Southend. Brighton and Hove councillor 1999-2010. Contested Brighton Pavilion 2001, 2005. MEP since 2010, succeeding upon Caroline Lucas`s election to Parliament.
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ALEXANDRA PHILLIPS (Green) Teacher. Brighton and Hove councillor since 2009.

3. Derek Wall 4. Jason Kitcat
5. Miriam Kennet 6. Beverley Golden
7. Jonathan Essex 8. Jonathan Kent
9. Stuart Jeffrey 10. Ray Cunningham
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JOHN ROBINSON (BNP) Painter and decorator.
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GAVIN MILLER (BNP)

3. Eric Elliott 4. John Moore
5. Alwyn Deacon 6. Anthony Bamber
7. Brenda Waterhouse 8. Mark Jones
9. Jack Renshaw 10. Yvonne Deacon
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STEVE UNCLES (English Democrats) Born 1964, Blackheath. Educated at Chislehurst and Sidcup Grammar. Project manager. Contested South East region in 2004, 2009 European elections region. Contested Bromley and Chislehurst by-election 2006, Gravesham 2010. Contested South Wales West 2007 Welsh elections. Contested Londonwide list in 2008 London elections. Contested Kent 2013 police commissioner election.

2. Julia Gasper 3. Amanda Hopwood
4. Simone Clark 5. Steve Clegg
6. Milly Uncles 7. Mike Russell
8. Mike Tibby 9. Doreen Dye
10. William James
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DAVE CHESHAM (Socialist Party of GB)

2. Rob Cox 3. Les Courtney
4. Sean Deegan 5. Max Hess
6. Claudia Hogg-Blake 7. Danny Lambert
8. Andy Matthews 9. Howard Pilott
10. Mike Young
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PAUL WESTON (Liberty GB) Born 1963, Malaysia. Educated at Fosters Grammar School, Sherborne. Contested Cities of London and Westminster 2010 for UKIP.

2. Enza Ferreri 3. Jack Buckby
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LAURENCE STASSEN (An Independence from Europe) Born 1971, Sittard. Former television presenter. MEP for the Netherlands since 2009, originally elected for the Party for Freedom (PVV).. Resigned from the PVV in March 2014 over comments Geert Wilders had made abour Moroccans.

2. Joyce Nattrass 3. Paul Godfrey
4. Alan Sheath 5. Ken Holtom
6. Mark Henry 7. Keith Vernon
8. Michaelina Argy 9. Seana Connolly
10. Dorothy Sheath
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NORMAN BURNETT (CPA) Born 1964. Educated at Picardy School. Outreach worker and bus driver.

2. Suzanne Fernandes 3. Flora Amar
4. Rev Anthony 5. Dorothy Mugara
6. Kayode Shedowo 7. Bridget Oyekan
8. Nnenna St Luce 9. Chikka Roja
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JOHN MORRIS (Peace Party) Born 1938, London. Contested Guildford 1997, 2001, 2005, 2010. South East 2009 European elections.

2. Jim Duggan 3. Julie Roxburgh
4. Jeff Bolam 5. Geoff Pay
6. David Brown 7. Keith Scott
8. Imdad Hussain 9. Munim Choudhury
10. Charles Wilkinson
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JULIAN JAMES (YourVOICE) Educated at Royal Grammar School Guildford and BRNC Dartmouth. IT and business services consultant.

2. Rachel Ling 3. Fulvia James
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JEAN-LOUIS PASCUAL (Roman Party Ave!) Born in France. Educated at Thames Valley University. Bus driver. Contested South East region 2009 European election.
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TERRY LEACH (Harmony Party)

2. Raymond Crick
Comments - 102 Responses on “South East European Candidates 2014”
  1. TNS BMRB poll on the Euros

    UKIP 36%
    Lab 27%
    Con 18%
    LD 10%
    Others 9%

  2. This is not a typo:

    ComRes, Euro poll:

    UKIP 38%
    Lab 27%
    Con 18%
    LD 8%

  3. Lib Dems are buggered and UKIP vote double the Tories’ is very uncomfortable reading for all of them.

  4. The political elites’ strategy of attacking individual UKIP candidates with weird views is backfiring spectacularly. Picking on ordinary people who are a tad less intelligent than average isn’t a good idea IMO. What they need to do is come up with positive reasons for supporting the EU.

  5. The principle of attacking these undesirable candidates is fine enough. But it can, and has been, overplayed. And as you said, it neither provides a positive case for the EU, and importantly, doesn’t get to the heart of UKIP’s anti-elite, anti-immigration message.

    I knew UKIP would get a surge in the polls as the campaign ran on, although this is so far bigger than I expected. If this trend carries on, UKIP could well top poll here in the South East, which would be quite something considering how much of a middle-class Conservative heartland this overall tends to be.

  6. I don’t know if they’ll top the polls in the south east generally, but they certainly have a great chance of doing so in Kent which has the prime UKIP demographic. Pockets of other counties might look good for them too. Aldershot, Crawley, Banbury?

  7. Just noticed there’s a “Roman Party Ave!” listed. Weird.

  8. Yeah, he’s a regular candidate round here in Reading. A rather gregarious bus driver, as I understand. Not sure what his policies are, beyond remarking ‘when in Rome do as the Romans do.’ Whatever that means.

    Pretty expensive running as a no-hope candidate in the Euros. The deposit isn’t exactly pocket money.

  9. I have wondered where a bus driver gets five grand to blow on a joke candidacy.

  10. I was just thinking that as well. I know back in 2009, he said the deposit was £5000, and he said he spent a further £2000 on the campaign. I know we in Reading Labour are proud of our well-supported bus service (it’s one of the few council-owned left), but I don’t think we pay them that (!) well.

    Spending £7000 on a joke candidacy isn’t exactly my idea of good money, but each to their own I guess.

  11. I am becoming concerned that UKIP could end up reaching 40% in these euro elections.

    I must update the predictions I was going to put on here next week.

  12. Nirj Deva is the second cousin of Sri Lankan ambassador to the UK Chris Nonis. He sees his role as being the Government of Sri Lanka’s attack dog within the European Parliament and is known for his frequent intemperate rants against human rights activists, Channel 4 News, and others criticizing Sri Lanka’s human rights record.

  13. Andy JS reported this poll to us on April 30.

    ComRes, Euro poll:
    UKIP 38%
    Lab 27%
    Con 18%
    LD 8%

    I calculate that the seat result, on those percentages, would be UKIP 4, Lab 3, Con 2 and LD 1. The 10th seat goes to the Lib Dem.

  14. That was a national poll obviously

  15. Indeed. As much as I would wish otherwise, my party coming second with 3 seats is just not on. And as has been reported elsewhere, that poll uses a very different methodology to most, so I wouldn’t take it as gospel.

  16. Gary,
    Yes, your calculation is mathematically accurate, but why would you calculate based on applying direct the national vote shares on a fortnight old poll?

    Doing the same with _tonight’s_ ICM (CON 27%, LAB 24%, LDEM 7%, UKIP 26%, GRN 10% would give 3 Con, 3Lab, 3 UKIP and 1 Green MEP in a 10 seat region. But the SE share of the vote won’t match the national overall result (less LAB for a start).

  17. I’m going to predict:

    3 UKIP
    3 Conservatives
    2 Labour
    1 Liberal Democrat
    1 Green

    I’m inclined to believe UKIP will top the poll here, though it’s not as natural a development as I think some people assume. What is a middle-class Conservative heartland is not natural territory for UKIP.

  18. For the South East I’m predicting:

    3 Conservative
    3 UKIP
    2 Labour
    1 Lib Dem
    1 Green

  19. I agree with most of Adam’s predictions. Here I think Labour will not get a second seat, as this implies c16% of the vote. In a region where they have only four of the 82 MP’s and hardly a better share of councilors this is a tall order. I would expect their campaign to be focused on a small number of target council wards in a few districts, which risks stay-at-homes and UKIP leakage of their few voters in the suburban and rural areas.

    I think the Conservatives will top the poll here. The Lib Dems are likely to hang on to one of their MEP’s here which will also slightly reduce the leakage of protest votes to UKIP, who will win 3 seats.

    It remains to be seen if they can keep all of the MEP’s for the full five year term, as Nigel Farrage has lost both running mates since two UKIP seats were won in 2004..

  20. I can certainly see both your main points, GT. Our European candidates here have been working hard, but it won’t surprise you – judging from our non-EU EU campaign nationally – that there isn’t really a big Euro-orientated campaign going on for Labour on the ground here. It’s mostly just a focus on the locals, particularly in the urban areas. Whilst I think we will get a second seat, I agree it’s far from certain. Doesn’t help the PR system really befuddles alot of the members I know – some were talking about getting three seats, before I had to rather bring them back down to Earth. There is definitely too much of an overconfident assumption that we will get two seats – mostly from that lack of understanding of the PR system.

    I also agree the Conservatives have a good chance of remaining top. I wouldn’t be surprised at all if they do. For now though, I’m going to hedge my bets on UKIP.

  21. Difficult to tell – I do suspect UKIP will not come top nationally though.

  22. Will not?

  23. Will not

  24. Interesting. I’ll go with they will.

  25. im voting for the roman party, jean is a really nice person. I really wish there was a party supporting a Federal Europe.

  26. Do we vote on Thursday with the local elections?

  27. Yes.

  28. Aedan,

    Labour is part of the PES, which supports a more federal Europe. Granted Labour MEPs would probably vote against it, but shh.

  29. Aedan,
    Across the spectrum there is a good range of pro- and anti- European parties (although the LibDems are the most right-wing pro-European party in the UK that realistically _might_ win seats, and no thoroughly anti-European left-leaning party stands a hope of winning seats).

    In addition to Labour/PES, if you want a right wing federalist party I suspect CPA would align to the Christian Democrats in the European Parliament, who are federalist. The LibDems keenly support a federal Europe and are part of a group (ALDE) in the European Parliament that supports a federal Europe (but is much more right wing than even the LibDems in the UK). The Greens in England and Wales are pro-European but not terribly keen on a federal Europe, but are part of a group in the EP that is federalist, while also wanting subsidiarity – ie powers at the most local level possible, which is why the group also includes the Plaid Cymru and SNP MEPs.

  30. “more right wing than even the LibDems in the UK”

    Lol

  31. There are some mind-numbingly dull people on here at times

  32. What have the LibDems and UKIP got in common in this European Election? Both support the “Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership” (TTIP), a trade deal that will allow big business to sue governments for introducing regulations that might curb their abilities to make big profits.
    That’s pretty right wing.

  33. Labour support TTIP as well

  34. The roman party hand-out made more sense than most of the others. That will be my protest vote.
    A pox on all the others I say.
    I wish the greens had more reality answers.

  35. I have now read the green manifesto and wish to apologise, and give them my vote, as they DO really have some very good ideas, which, sorry to roman party, but the greens are more likely to get in.

  36. Sorry to see that no2eu are not standing in the south east

  37. Interesting — I’d taken it for granted they were standing everywhere.

  38. UKIP 31.5 (4)
    Con 28 (3)
    Lab 14 (1)
    GRN 9.5 (1)
    LD 8.5 (1)
    BNP 2
    Other 6.5

  39. If Roman AVE get in then expect a new circus maximus on the site of the old Reading Speedway and the hexagon will be the new coliseum………………………………..cool!

  40. All I’m going to see in reaction to European election results is well done and congratulations to all the UKIP supporters out there. This must be a special moment for your party and you now know how we stories felt in 1983, how Labour felt in 1997 and how the SNP felt in 2011.

    I don’t think the main parties should get too varied away with UKIP though. It’s important to remember that they only got just over a quarter of the vote and that a large proportion of the electorate still consider themselves to be very strongly anti-UKIP. That’s why people keeping talking about UKIP having a natural ceiling to their support at about 35%, although the mainstream media don’t always emphasise this point.

  41. “This must be a special moment for your party and you now know how we stories felt in 1983, how Labour felt in 1997”

    Oh FFS. In 1983 Margaret Thatcher had just been re-elected as one of the main leaders of the free world by a historic landslide, ditto Tony Blair in 1997. UKIP have just eked out a “victory” on a pitiful 27% of the vote in elections nobody cares about to a body which has no powers, on a 30% turnout. Despite predictions by idiots on here like 111 who confidently expected UKIP to poll 40% of the vote and sweep all before them.

    No-one’s denying that UKIP will most likely have an important role as a spoiler party in 2015 and might pick up the odd seat, but get a sense of proportion man.

  42. *Applauds*

  43. Well UKIP have topped the poll which is an achievement few of us thought possible only a few years ago. It’s only fair that UKIP be given the chance to enjoy their 15 minutes if fame before we get back to the day to day realities of modern politics.

  44. And by that I mean the fact that it’s still very unlikely that UKIP will win any seats in the general election and the real issue which most of us care about is who will be the largest party in next years almost inevitable hung parliament.

  45. I am extremely pleased with my party’s performance. Our vote held up stunningly well and the scenario of us being on 18% or so that looked possible a few weeks ago didn’t come to light. UKIP’s performance was quite poor given the circumstances. I was expecting 32% from them at the minimum. Yes, AIP took a couple of points away from their share but their performance was hardly staggering with no 3 MEPs in the SW, no 4 in the West Midlands, no 2 in London etc.

    The Tories even nearly held on to 4 seats in the SE and 1 in the NE for goodness sake.

  46. Well people on here have been telling you most of that for months. No more than 1 UKIP seat in London in particular.

  47. I have stopped the very outlandish predictions now and will go for less outlandish ones instead. It is looking good for the Tories indeed.

    Potential 2015 scenario:

    LAB: 31%
    CON: 31%
    UKIP: 16%
    LD: 11%
    GRN: 4%
    SNP: 3%
    OTH: 4%

    I think that the UKIP vote will potentially increase on this year’s local results in their target seats but will fall back a bit in other seats. Much of this fallback vote will go to the Conservatives, though it will only account for a few percent.

  48. I was nearly right about the 18% in London, H Hemmelig. I was right in saying that the Lib Dems would only retain the one seat in the South East. I was also right about UKIP topping the poll in the SE despite many people here telling me that the area was too prosperous.

    In truth no one on here was particularly correct about the outcome.

  49. To be fair you were right about UKIP doing quite well in SE London in the local elections, though they only picked up a couple of seats they polled well in Bromley, Bexley, Croydon and Eltham and almost certainly gave Labour control in Croydon.

  50. Labour came top in Oxford, Slough and Reading from what I’ve seen of authority regions so far in the SE. They’ll be disappointed about coming 2nd to UKIP in Crawley and Hastings though. Can’t seem to find specific results for Brighton & Hove and Southampton though. In Hastings they were only a few hundred votes behind UKIP.

    But UKIP seems to have swept the board in Kent albeit quite predictably.

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