Meon Valley

2015 Result:
Conservative: 31578 (61.1%)
Labour: 5656 (10.9%)
Lib Dem: 4987 (9.6%)
Green: 1831 (3.5%)
UKIP: 7665 (14.8%)
MAJORITY: 23913 (46.2%)

Category: Ultra-safe Conservative seat

Geography: South East, Hampshire. Parts of Winchester, East Hampshire and Havant council areas.

Main population centres: Waterlooville, Horndean, Bishops Waltham, Denmead, Droxford, Shedfield.

Profile: A large seat to the north of Portsmouth. The eastern part of the constituency is the more urban, being made of the town of Waterlooville, including the village of Cowplain and the Wecock Farm council estate, and the large semi-rural village of Horndean to its the North. The large western part is far more rural, consisting of picturesque countryside and small towns and villages including Bishops Waltham, Denmead, Droxford & Shedfield. With the exception of parts of Waterlooville it is an affluent and middle-class seat.

Politics: Meon Valley was created in 2010 as an extra seat for Hampshire. It was expected to be a marginal between the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats, but in the event was a relatively easy Conservative win.


Current MP
GEORGE HOLLINGBERY (Conservative) Born 1963, Beverley. Educated at Radley College and Oxford University. Former stockbroker and Chairman of a chain of vets. Winchester councillor since 1999. Contested Winchester 2005. First elected as MP for Meon Valley in 2010.
Past Results
2010
Con: 28818 (56%)
Lab: 3266 (6%)
LDem: 16693 (33%)
UKIP: 1490 (3%)
Oth: 971 (2%)
MAJ: 12125 (24%)

Demographics
2015 Candidates
GEORGE HOLLINGBERY (Conservative) See above.
GEMMA MCKENNA (Labour)
CHRIS CARRIGAN (Liberal Democrat)
DAVID ALEXANDER (UKIP)
DIANA KORCHIEN (Green)
Links
Comments - 59 Responses on “Meon Valley”
  1. I also find it incomprehensible how MPs, who already aren’t the most highly esteemed profession these days, can think that it’s even REMOTELY acceptable to delay / hinder etc boundary adjustments, based on fair and impartial rules, in their or their party’s naked self-interest.

    All these crocodile tears about reducing the no of MPs to 600 is mostly smoke and mirrors from those who would be opposed to the impartial BR going ahead. They’re just using it to give their opposition to the changes a veneer of respectability.

    How many average Joes and Josettes really care if there’s 600 or 650 MPs in total? Virtually none I should think.

  2. ‘I also find it incomprehensible how MPs, who already aren’t the most highly esteemed profession these days, can think that it’s even REMOTELY acceptable to delay / hinder etc boundary adjustments’

    Most people don’t give a sh*t one way or another

    Only died in the wool Tories like yourself are giving it any thought because you realise the partisan gain available – or rather it remove the current bias towards Labour in the voting system

    People get far more worked up about promises MPs make to stop giving themselves inflation-busting pay rises – and yet the last review of their salaries resulted in a 10% increase – which incidentally took place in the midst of the budget deficit crisis

    That to me gives me a better inbdication of the type of people representing us rather then their refusal to back partisan boundary changes

  3. @Tim J

    “‘I also find it incomprehensible how MPs, who already aren’t the most highly esteemed profession these days, can think that it’s even REMOTELY acceptable to delay / hinder etc boundary adjustments’

    Most people don’t give a sh*t one way or another”

    That’s quite possible too.

    “Only died in the wool Tories like yourself are giving it any thought”

    I’m not a Tory let alone a died in the wool one. As usual, you slip quickly into your lazy partisan labelling of everyone. About time you learnt that people don’t fit nicely into the little boxes you’ve made for them all.

Leave a Reply

NB: Before commenting please make sure you are familiar with the Comments Policy. UKPollingReport is a site for non-partisan discussion of polls.

You are not currently logged into UKPollingReport. Registration is not compulsory, but is strongly encouraged. Either login here, or register here (commenters who have previously registered on the Constituency Guide section of the site *should* be able to use their existing login)