Maidenhead

2015 Result:
Conservative: 35453 (65.8%)
Labour: 6394 (11.9%)
Lib Dem: 5337 (9.9%)
Green: 1915 (3.6%)
UKIP: 4539 (8.4%)
Independent: 162 (0.3%)
Others: 55 (0.1%)
MAJORITY: 29059 (54%)

Category: Ultra-safe Conservative seat

Geography: South East, Berkshire. The western part of the Windsor and Maidenhead council area and part of the Wokingham council area to the east of Reading.

Main population centres: Maidenhead, TWyford, Bray, Wargrave, Cookham.

Profile: The constituency consists of the town of Maidenhead itself, an affluent town on the Thames with strong high-tech and pharmaceutical industries, but also stretches south-west to include a swathe of countryside right up to the suburbs of Reading. The seat includes the villages of Cookham, Wargrave, Twyford and Bray - now best known as the location of Heston Blumenthal`s restaurant The Fat Duck, named as the best restaurant in the world in 2005.

Politics: Affluent and middle class, politically Maidenhead has been Conservative since it was split off from the equally Conservative Windsor and Maidenhead seat in 1997. In 2001 the majority fell to just over 3,000 and the seat was supposedly one of those where the Liberal Democrats attempted to "decapitate" leading Conservative politicians. In the event the Conservative majority doubled and with beneficial boundaries charges for the Tories in 2005 it is increasingly safe.


Current MP
THERESA MAY (Conservative) Born 1956, Eastbourne. Educated at Holton Park Girls Grammar and Oxford University. Former financial consultant. Merton councillor 1986-1994. Contested North West Durham 1992, Barking 1994 by-election. First elected as MP for Maidenhead in 1997. Shadow education secretary 1999-2001, shadow transport secretary 2001-2002, Chairman of the Conservative party 2002-2004, shadow family secretary 2004-2005, shadow culture secretary 2005, shadow leader of the Commons 2005-2009, shadow work and pensions secretary 2009-2010. Home Secretary since 2010.
Past Results
2010
Con: 31937 (59%)
Lab: 3795 (7%)
LDem: 15168 (28%)
UKIP: 1243 (2%)
Oth: 1577 (3%)
MAJ: 16769 (31%)
2005*
Con: 23312 (51%)
Lab: 4144 (9%)
LDem: 17081 (37%)
BNP: 704 (2%)
Oth: 609 (1%)
MAJ: 6231 (14%)
2001
Con: 19506 (45%)
Lab: 6577 (15%)
LDem: 16222 (37%)
UKIP: 741 (2%)
Oth: 272 (1%)
MAJ: 3284 (8%)
1997
Con: 25344 (50%)
Lab: 9205 (18%)
LDem: 13363 (26%)
Oth: 1339 (3%)
MAJ: 11981 (24%)

*There were boundary changes after 2005

Demographics
2015 Candidates
THERESA MAY (Conservative) See above.
CHARLES SMITH (Labour) Educated at Warwick University. Solicitor.
ANTHONY HILL (Liberal Democrat) Former headteacher. Contested Maidenhead 2010.
HERBIE CROSSMAN (UKIP) Security consultant. Harrow councillor 1994-1998 for the Liberal Democrats. Contested Harrow West 1997 for the Referendum party, Haltemprice and Howden 2008 by-election as Independent, Harrow West 2010 for UKIP.
EMILY BLYTH (Green) Musician.
JOE WILCOX (Class War)
IAN TAPLIN (Independent)
Links
Comments - 2,422 Responses on “Maidenhead”
  1. Not sure this delay is legal. My earlier post yesterday about the date being on the Statute Book already. Or are we now just making it up as we go along?

  2. “a member of the ruling class that you are, who is lucky enough to be able to withstand the most painful aspects that no deal will entail”

    If it kicks off IRA terrorism again, it will be highly painful for us all, prince or pauper. For this reason alone I doubt either the UK government or the EU will allow No Deal to proceed, despite the pathetic bravado from JJB and others on our side, and indeed this is why the unconditional extension to 12th April was offered by the EU.

    My prediction for what it’s worth-

    May’s deal is voted down again
    The government is forced to request a long extension, and has to take part in the Euro elections
    May steps down in disgrace and a caretaker takes over (Lidington), perhaps a proper leadership contest happens in a few months’ time
    Within the extension there will either have to be a GE or a second referendum

    Alternatively a Norway Brexit might also emerge from next week but this would also be the end of May.

  3. It’s quite a noteworthy phenomenon that leavers have barely defended the actual policy of leaving the EU at all since the people of Britain voted to do so. It’s all been “will of the people” and variations on that theme, and now we are seeing arcane legal arguments being deployed to try to push Brexit over the line. Can someone on this thread who voted for Brexit just remind me why we are doing this to ourselves? What gains do you expect from it?

  4. “Not sure this delay is legal. My earlier post yesterday about the date being on the Statute Book already. Or are we now just making it up as we go along?”

    There will be emergency legislation to change the date, that was made clear last night.

  5. “It’s all been “will of the people” and variations on that theme”

    Which is over-egging it in the extreme. More accurate is “the will of a marginal, diminishing plurality of the electorate”. Given that more than 60% of “the people” either voted Remain or didn’t vote.

  6. PT – Sovereignty, no more paying £billions, freedom over immigration policy being the main three in polls. As for why we are doing it – because we are a democracy and we respect decisions (unlike the EU who is used to just asking the Q until they get the answer they want).

    HH – I agree with some of that, although Norway was the least popular option the last time it was mooted, ie almost as unpopular as the 2nd Ref/revoke which musters only 90 – 120 MPs.

    Incidentally I was right in that two polls showed the public do indeed blame MPs more than May.

    But it was amusing seeing politicians and the London media up in arms – I suspect because they secretly knew that the public would agree with May (that it’s MPs holding things up).

  7. HH – lol you can say that only when anything ever manages to achieve over 17m votes.

  8. “HH – lol you can say that only when anything ever manages to achieve over 17m votes.”

    I’m not at all denying that Leave has a democratic mandate. I just object strongly when people talk about “the will of the people” like it’s something unanimous. Even the Leave voters are far from unanimous about what they want.

    “HH – I agree with some of that, although Norway was the least popular option the last time it was mooted, ie almost as unpopular as the 2nd Ref/revoke which musters only 90 – 120 MPs.”

    Norway certainly isn’t ideal or popular but neither are any of the realistic alternatives. May is paying the price for making Brexit so party political in 2016 and 2017. We should have come to a broad settlement early on about where we want to go. A second referendum soon after the first asking “how do you want to Leave” would have been a good idea, giving the chosen strategy some kind of legitimacy.

    The way May has handled things more or less guarantees binary, extreme, polarised outcomes and because No Deal is so inconceivable to both sides it will likely mean the eventual outcome will be on the soft side of the extremes. Whatever happens the Tories will be very badly damaged in the longer term once the threat of Corbyn no longer props up their vote.

  9. I think what worried the EU yesterday is that both May and Corbyn weren’t bluffing re No Deal.

    I’m simply amazed that it took MPs until a month ago to realise what the law means. It’s not that they have any say or means to trigger or prevent it – it’s simply what happens when time expires.

    Merely voting against it is akin to them saying they wish Friday never comes.

    Only a few such as Letwin and Bercow realised what had to happen in order to extend any deadline.

  10. ‘Incidentally I was right in that two polls showed the public do indeed blame MPs more than May.’

    That doesn’t square with the fact that every poll shows her deal considerably less popular than a no deal or remaining in the EU

    Whilst I still hope that Hemmelig’s prediction comes to fruit, at the moment – because of May and her abysmal leadership – it’s a binary choice between her fairly woeful deal and a disastrous No Deal – which really is no choice at all (her deal wins every time simply by not being No Deal)

  11. “it’s a binary choice between her fairly woeful deal and a disastrous No Deal – which really is no choice at all (her deal wins every time simply by not being No Deal)”

    IMO, No Deal won’t be allowed to happen. If May’s deal won’t pass and she continues to refuse to countenance a different deal, we will continue to delay and extend ad infinitum (whatever the EU says).

    If May’s deal passes and it proves to be a total dud, it simply won’t endure and it will be ripped up. I think that’s at least one small thing that Lancs Observer agrees with me on.

  12. Tim J – of course it does square.

    Because those voting against it are MPs – who the public blame for the impasse. It’s always shown to be more popular with the public (though I admit that wasn’t difficult).

    90% said it’s been a national humiliation.

    But 36% – 42% blame MPs for that in those 2 polls.

    Just 24% – 28% blamed the PM.

  13. Considering the likes of JRM and Farrage are not saying that a delay could be stopped by parliament it’s clearly not going to be hard to change the statutory instrument.

  14. Does anyone outside of poltical and legal circles actually understand what May deal is. Arguably many mp’s don’t seem to really understand it.
    I think No deal could happen – possibly by the government forcing a prorogation of parliament between deciding and exit date (through Buckingham Palace would hate to get involve in such a controversial decision.)

  15. BM11 – not hard but it still needs to be done in the 4 days left of the House sitting.

    I imagine legislation rather than an SI – because Grayling’s was ruled unlawful and MPs won’t want to risk a judicial review challenge.

  16. Andrea Leadsom said yesterday in the commons it will be a SI.

  17. “I think No deal could happen”

    If it does it won’t last for more than a few weeks, and it will bring down the government. The route to a deal might even be via a few weeks of No Deal.

    As it happens I spoke with the European Commission on the phone yesterday, on unrelated matters. The discussion reinforced my view that No Deal is unlikely to be allowed to happen by either side.

    Given the bad temperedness today I don’t think I’ll make any Brexit related posts on here again.

  18. Uri Geller – resident of this seat (who the PM has visited at his house.) – has announced that he will telepathically stop brexit and prevent Jeremy Corbyn becoming PM.

  19. Amazing

  20. I think polls after next week will show Faarage for PM above 20%.

  21. After this mess is fixed, we need to reinvigorate the Conservative Party. It needs to be a party which is in tune with the the Conservative instincts of the backbone of this great Country, not runs scared of the liberal elites in the establishment.(who cocked up Brexit when they should have played hard ball). And, as is already the case, be a party that is is firmly rooted in the domestic agenda to improve people’s lives.

  22. What domestic agenda? Name a significant piece of non-Brexit legislation that Theresa May has passed.

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