Lichfield

2015 Result:
Conservative: 28389 (55.2%)
Labour: 10200 (19.8%)
Lib Dem: 2700 (5.2%)
Green: 1976 (3.8%)
UKIP: 8082 (15.7%)
Others: 120 (0.2%)
MAJORITY: 18189 (35.3%)

Category: Ultra-safe Conservative seat

Geography: West Midlands, Staffordshire. The western part of the Lichfield council area and part of the East Staffordshire council area.

Main population centres: Lichfield, Burntwood, Armitage, Kings Bromley, Yoxall, Alrewas, Barton-under-Needwood, Armitage.

Profile: Lichfield itself is a small city that grew to prominence as a staging point for the coaching trade and declined after the coming of the railways. It is now an attractive Georgian city that is a domitory for the Metropolitan West Midlands. To the west of Lichfield is the more industrial former mining town of Burntwood. The rest of the seat is made up of rural towns and villages like Alrewas, Yoxall and Barton-under-Needwood. The seat includes the National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas and the Armitage Shanks factory in the village of Armitage.

Politics: The rural villages tend to lean towards the Conservatives, as do suburban areas in Lichfield like Boley Park, cancelling out the Labour strength in Burntwood. Lichfield was an ultra-marginal on its creation in the Labour landslide election of 1997, with Labour coming within 238 votes of winning the seat. Since then Labour`s support has faded away and in 2015 Michael Fabricant enjoyed a towering majority of over thirty percent.


Current MP
MICHAEL FABRICANT (Conservative) Born 1950, Brighton. Educated at Brighton and Hove Grammar and Loughborough University. Former director of a broadcast manufacturing and management group. Contested South Shields 1987. First elected as MP for Mid Staffordshire in 1992. PPS to Michael Jack 1996-97, Shadow Trade spokesman 2003, Shadow Economic Affairs spokesman 2003-05, Opposition Whip 2005-10, Government Whip 2010-12. Unfortunately best known for his unusual hair, which has been relentlessly mocked by Parliamentary sketchwriters.
Past Results
2010
Con: 28048 (54%)
Lab: 10230 (20%)
LDem: 10365 (20%)
UKIP: 2920 (6%)
MAJ: 17683 (34%)
2005*
Con: 21274 (49%)
Lab: 14194 (32%)
LDem: 6804 (16%)
UKIP: 1472 (3%)
MAJ: 7080 (16%)
2001
Con: 20480 (49%)
Lab: 16054 (39%)
LDem: 4462 (11%)
UKIP: 684 (2%)
MAJ: 4426 (11%)
1997
Con: 20853 (43%)
Lab: 20615 (42%)
LDem: 5473 (11%)
MAJ: 238 (0%)

*There were boundary changes after 2005

Demographics
2015 Candidates
MICHAEL FABRICANT (Conservative) See above.
CHRIS WORSEY (Labour) Educated at Great Wyrley High School and Keele University. Entrepreneur. Sandwell councillor since 2012.
PAUL RAY (Liberal Democrat)
JOHN RACKHAM (UKIP)
ROBERT PASS (Green) Educated at King Edward VI School and Birmingham University. Director in a recycling business.
ANDY BENNETTS (Class War)
Links
Comments - 117 Responses on “Lichfield”
  1. Crazy swing. Only candidate to live in the ward I hear

  2. https://www.politicshome.com/news/uk/social-affairs/discrimination/news/96807/tory-mp-michael-fabricant-accused-islamophobia-over

    It’s one thing for a random, grizzled dinosaur in the Tory Party to post something like this – it’s quite different when it’s an actual MP.

    Much worse, IMO, than what Anne-Marie Morris was suspended for (an off-the-cuff remark aimed at no-one in particular). The sooner that Islamophobia probe starts, the better.

  3. This morning Khan was on BBC Breakfast saying Trump should laugh at the ridiculous Trump balloon in the same way Thatcher and Reagan laughed at their Spitting Image puppets. Well if that’s the case he can’t complain about others making fun of him in the same way. The determination these days to label everything under the sun as Islamophobic, racist, sexist, ageist, homophobic or whatever is deeply damaging as it blurs bad or unfunny jokes with genuinely appallingly offensive behaviour, which this IMO is not.

    The Labour party are the ones who, more than anyone, have brought this dreary identity politics to the fore in the UK, promising to stand up for this minority group and that minority group against their oppressors. Well you can hardly blame the Tories for getting with the game, depressing as it is that politics has come to this. The Tories will never win many muslim votes so it’s natural they will try to survive in the era of rising ethnic minority population by harnessing votes from hindus, sikhs, Jews etc. It would be nice to go back to the 80s when mainstream politics eschewed this divisiveness but it’s not going to happen.

  4. PS I had lunch with a business associate yesterday – as he’s lived in Islington and then Hackney for 30 odd years I’d always assumed he was pretty liberal.

    “I’ll tell you what they should do with that balloon” he said, “a policeman should just shoot a hole in the fucking thing”.

    Appalling as Trump’s behaviour has been on this visit, I can’t help feeling we’ve played into his hands.

  5. Posted this on the Hallam thread by mistake.

    I think a lot of people would not agree that politics wasn’t divisive in the 80s. I would argue that it most certainly was…perhaps more on social grounds than racial grounds, granted. Casual racism was also a lot more acceptable then.

  6. Yes I agree, and being a bit older than you I remember the casual racism better.

    What I meant was that identity politics was confined to the fringes (GLC, loony left councils etc) whereas now it has totally taken over the mainstream.

    80s politics certainly was divisive in other ways, Miners Strike etc, in many cases more so than today.

    I do wish MPs like that twat Fabricant would stay off Twitter. I him having a flag of apartheid South Africa in the background is probably a bigger deal than Khan and his flying pig.

  7. ‘I think a lot of people would not agree that politics wasn’t divisive in the 80s.’

    Politics was definitely divisive in the 1980s but not in the same way as it is today where you are either in one camp – liberal, internationalist, Remain – or the other – conservative, nationalist, Brexit – with virtually nothing in between

  8. “Politics was definitely divisive in the 1980s but not in the same way as it is today where you are either in one camp – liberal, internationalist, Remain – or the other – conservative, nationalist, Brexit – with virtually nothing in between”

    Yep.

    And in the 1980s the average Joe was extremely well informed about politics. I watched a documentary on the Miners Strike from 1984 the other day and the political knowledge of the ordinary miners interviewed was exemplary.

  9. I don’t think it’s really fair to blame identity politics on the Labour Party, so much as on the wider cultural left.

    The actual party itself has generally steered clear of identity politics. Tony Blair never went in for it because he was worried about spooking Essex Man. Jeremy Corbyn was always one of those “no war but the class war” types. And in between them, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband had very little influence on popular discourse anyway.

  10. ‘And in the 1980s the average Joe was extremely well informed about politics.’

    Considerably better than they are today

    one of my earliest memories is of the cleaning ladies at the nursery I used to go to in North Wales (late 70s/early 80s) all huddled around a radio listening to the budget and lamenting the rise in duty on cigarettes amongst other things

  11. Hemmy – I hardly think miners were representative of the population though. Whether they wanted it or not, they were caught up in the totemic political battle of the eighties. Under those circumstances, you educate yourself.

    Similarly, I would imagine EU citizens living in Britain are more clued-up than the average Brit. When your future depends on it, you learn what’s going on.

  12. I totally missed the Apartheid era flag. Yikes.

  13. ‘Similarly, I would imagine EU citizens living in Britain are more clued-up than the average Brit.’

    Almost certainly and largely because of the vacuous, celebrity culture that appeals to so many of the uneducated Brits, who know nothing and care even less about today’s politics

    A cynic might say this was the aim of Thatcherism

  14. “Hemmy – I hardly think miners were representative of the population though. Whether they wanted it or not, they were caught up in the totemic political battle of the eighties. Under those circumstances, you educate yourself.”

    I’m not sure I agree with that. I think you’ll find most working class people were pretty well informed then compared with now. It was one of the few positive side effects of a very high trade union membership, a “them and us” culture between bosses/government and the workers, and a much more politicised society than we have today.

    Tim’s right that celebrity culture is partly to blame, but also there is a widespread distrust and dislike of politicians in general which was far less common then than now. Basically today’s politicians are of far lower calibre than a generation ago. In a sense we are lucky that politicians have so much less power to change the economy than they used to….if this useless rabble were in charge in the 1970s and 1980s this country would have totally flushed itself down the toilet (though WW3 would probably have killed us first).

  15. Re Trump, Sky Data poll showed over 60% agreed he should meet HM Queen (which is even higher than YouGov’s 50%).

  16. HH – I suppose that’s only true if you equate having the trade unions’ view of things as being “well informed.”

    People are better informed financially than they were back then; but, that’s partly because back then most didn’t have mortgages or could switch energy provider and so on. They were renting council houses and being paid in cash and weekly and most didn’t have consumer durables or go abroad on holiday.

    Although that’s also why Maggie aimed a PPB at the housewife handling the weekly budget.

  17. Yes I agree with that.

    People forget now what a massive effort it took to switch people in working class jobs from being paid weekly in cash to monthly into their bank account. The resistance was enormous.

    As a student in the early/mid-90s I worked at Ladbrokes and at that time the company still paid most workers weekly in cash. Seems extraordinary now.

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